Recent posts

New Surgical option for Glaucoma the iStent By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
July 21, 2017

iStent

Do you have glaucoma and cataracts? Perhaps you are a candidate for placement of an iStent at the time of your cataract surgery. Click on the image to the right for an informative video about this new innovation.  This is the smallest implantable device in medicine as you can see with it's comparison to the size of a penny. We can discuss if the iStent is an option for you at your next eye examination.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery, glaucoma surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


WHAT DOES 20/20 MEAN? By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
July 17, 2017
What does 20/20 vision actually mean?  The measurement of visual acuity is usually stated as 20 with some other number.  20/20 is considered normal vision.  If the bottom number is larger than 20, the visual acuity is worse.  For example, a person with 20/200 visual acuity has worse visual acuity than somebody with 20/30 visual acuity.  A lot of fortunate people can see better than 20/20 (20/15 or even 20/10).  The best visual acuity thought achievable by a human is 20/8. 

The minimum separation the average person can see between two lines is 1 second of arc or 1/60 of a degree.  Using a mathematical formula, it can be calculated that this translates to a letter size of 8.75 mm or 0.35 inches high is what the average person should be able to see 20 feet away.  So a person that can see 20/20 can see as small as a 0.35 inch letter at 20 feet.  A person that sees 20/100 can only distinguish a 1.75 inch or larger letter 20 feet away.  In other words, what a 20/20 seeing individual can see at 100 feet, a 20/100 seeing individual would have to be 20 feet away (5 times closer) to see the same thing.

The visual acuity charts that we use are all based on these letter sizing calculations.  Herman Snellen was the ophthalmologist that invented the first standardized eye chart in 1862.  We still use similar charts to measure vision today.  Our vision charts are projected or digital, and we use a mirror to simulate a 20 foot long room.  At Lakeshore Eye Professionals our passion is to try to keep everybody seeing as close to 20/20 as possible for their entire life, especially now that you know what it means!

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an Optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Mark German. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.  For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


WHAT HAPPENS ON LASIK DAY? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
July 10, 2017

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Admit it, you are interested in having LASIK done but are worried about going through the actual procedure.  Fear no more, read below to see how easy it is.

I meet you at the laser center in Brookfield. You have brought along a driver for getting home afterwards. We give you a mild oral sedative (Ativan) to relax you. The intake nurse explains what to do when you get home (take a nap, start eye drops). Once in the laser suite, you lay down on your back between the two lasers.

For the first laser, you look into a dark tunnel and then feel a slight pressure sensation. The laser takes 6 seconds to generate the flap on the surface of your eye. We do the right eye first and then the left. While this pressure is not too tough to tolerate, it’s as bad as it gets. From then on you are home free.

For the second laser, you look at a tiny blinking green light while I gently retract the small flap and apply the laser to the surface of the eye. This laser runs a different durations depending on your prescription but generally about 30 seconds. I then reposition the flap and dry it in place for 30 seconds.

You sit up and can already see the clock at the end of the room but you vision is still slightly cloudy. You go home and take a nap, with the aid of an Ambien sleeping pill. When you wake up your vision is even better and this again happens the next morning. Most (90%) of the vision improvement occurs in the first day. There is a slower improvement over the next week. Most patients can easily drive themselves to their appointment the next day.

Doesn’t sound so bad, does it? What are you waiting for? See you soon.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


ARMS TOO SHORT? By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 22, 2017

Are you over 40? Are you having problems seeing your cell phone and the tiny print on medicine bottles? That's the start of "presbyopia." What’s happening is that your lens, located behind the colored iris, has become gradually firmer as the protein inside breaks down. As a result, the tiny muscles around it are unable to change the shape as easily as before. The result is slower focusing at different distances. Almost everyone experiences this between the ages of 44 and 46 years-old to the point where they need do something about it.

What can you do? While you cannot stop the process but there are a number of strategies to allow comfortable reading. If you have very good distance vision without glasses or wear contact lenses, you may be able to get by with over-the-counter reading glasses. They come in powers from +1.00 up to about +3.00. At first, the lower powers are sufficient but you then need to gradually ramp up as you get older.

Another strategy is the use of bifocal glasses. With those you look through the top of the glasses to see far away and then look down to read. There are even bifocal contact lenses available. Another potential contact lens option is the use of "mono-vision" contact lenses. With this strategy we set one contact lens for distance vision and the other for near. Mono-vision also works well with LASIK vision correction.

Even though you may be able to get by with reading glasses off the rack, don’t neglect your medical eye care. Schedule an appointment so we can thoroughly evaluate your eyes assist you in determining the best reading option for you.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


WHAT’S CATARACT SURGERY LIKE? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 7, 2017

What exactly happens during cataract surgery? Many with cataracts are afraid to have the surgery because they don’t really know what it would be like. Just

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

the word “surgery” scares them. It brings to mind pain, long recovery and time off from your favorite activities. Nothing could be farther from the truth with cataract surgery.

Modern cataract surgery is done without shots, stitches or patches. It takes only about 10 to 15 minutes. We use only mild I.V. sedation to relax you. You don’t feel anything because there are numbing drops applied to the surface of the eye. Afterwards, you look pretty much the way you did on the way in: no patch over the eye, no black and blue bruising. We recommend that you take 2 days off your regular activities, one for the actual procedure and the next day to allow your vision to settle. Then the only restrictions are no eye make-up, swimming or pushing on the eye for 2 weeks.

On the day of surgery, you change into a hospital gown and then an I.V. is started. Once in the operating room you look at a bright light. There IS NO PAIN. You may see pretty colors from a prism like effect of the lens as we remove it and replace it with a tiny plastic implant. About 30 minutes after the procedure, you go home or even out to lunch. You do need a ride as some of the sedation may still be in effect but you won’t need extra help at home.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

So, breath-in and breath-out, cataracts surgery is generally a quick and easy. It is the most common operation in America and patients are thrilled with the results. If every procedure worked as well as cataract surgery, the world would be a much better place!

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


9 Ways That Dry Eyes May Interupt Your Life - BUZZ FEED Article

By user-admin
May 30, 2017

Click on the image for a link to Buzz Feed article about dry eyes


WOW - HAS IT ALREADY BEEN A YEAR? By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 3, 2017

Where did the time go? About this time last year I was introducing myself as the new doctor at Lakeshore Eye Care. While I was new to Lakeshore Eye Care, I was certainly not new to optometry. I brought over 20 years of experience enhancing the vision of patients in southeastern Wisconsin.

Dr. James Ivanoski

It has been a privilege to join Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Mark German at Lakeshore Eye Care. While I enjoyed being a solo optometrist for many years, this new opportunity has allowed me to see more of a variety of patients as we are a combined Optometry/Ophthalmology practice.

My emphasis is on comprehensive eye examinations to evaluate the health of the eyes and how that relates to the patient’s other medical conditions. You will find that I am a good listener and will work with you to be sure you not only can see as well as possible but that all your concerns about your vision and eyes have been addressed.

Where did I come from? I did my undergraduate studies at the University of Wisconsin at Parkside. I then went on to be a top student at the Illinois College of Optometry, graduating Magna Cum Laude. My wife and two children make our home in West Bend. In my free time, look for me on the golf course or rooting for the Packers.

Enough about me, what is really my point is that I look forward to meeting you. Call today to schedule your comprehensive eye examination in either our Mequon or Saukville office. Should you require cataract surgery or have an interest in LASIK vision correction, our doctors at Lakeshore Eye Care can take care of you every step of the way.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www. LakeShoreVision.com.


WHAT IS A SECONDARY CATARACT? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 27, 2017

A common question from patients is, “Do cataracts come back?” The answer is yes and no. Once you have cataract surgery, you do not have to go back to the operating room at a later date to repeat the procedure. What can happen is that you may develop a secondary cataract. This is a clouding behind the implant and is easily treated with a quick laser procedure.

The lens in the eye is shaped like a tiny pillow, rounded on the edges and flattened on the front and back. It is covered with a thin membrane, measuring less than 5 microns thick. At the time of cataract surgery, we carefully remove a circular area from the front of this membrane and gently vacuum out your cloudy lens. We then use this remaining membrane, known as “the bag,” to support the plastic intraocular lens which allows you to see clearly after surgery.

In about 10% of cases, this membrane becomes cloudy over time and we call it a secondary cataract. It usually takes 2-3 years for this to happen and the symptoms are very similar to those noticed prior to the original surgery: blurred distance vision, glare and halos around lights.

As previously mentioned, the treatment is a quick laser. You wear street clothes and put your chin on something that looks just like what we use in the office during your eye exam. Afterwards there are no activity restrictions and the potential risk for complications is minimal. So if you start to notice that your vision has become blurred several years after cataract surgery, come in and we will determine if this is your problem. If so, clear vision is just a quick laser away.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK Vision Correction. She practices at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


BELL’S PALSY AND YOUR EYES By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 13, 2017

You experience a sudden weakness on one side of your face. It looks like you have had a stroke but it is probably Bell’s palsy. This condition is generally due to swelling of the nerve responsible for movement in your face (the “facial nerve”) and not a blood clot like a stroke.
The cause of the swelling is generally not known but the problem usually resolves without treatment in up to 84% of patients. The resolution starts about 3 weeks after the onset of the paralysis and may take up to 3 months. Oral steroids are sometimes used to speed up the process.

If the Bell’s palsy results in problems closing one eye, you should be followed by your eye care professional to be sure not damage the eye.
The key is keeping the cornea, or front part of the eye, lubricated. Frequent tear drops, an ointment at night and even taping the eye closed at night may be necessary.

Bell’s palsy is more common in diabetics, those with a family history of the condition and pregnant women. It can be associated with shingles in the ear canal or other problems.

If you think you have Bell’s palsy, you should first be evaluated by your primary care physician. They will then determine if you need to have an eye care professional involved to coordinate your care. Do you have other questions about your eyes or vision? Give us a call.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German practices general optometry at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


“CAN I BEND OVER AFTER CATARACT SURGERY?” By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 10, 2017

This has got to be the most common question I hear from cataract patients. Their sister, neighbor or friend at church told them, “Be sure you don’t bend over after your cataract surgery.” We give out specific written instructions after cataract surgery that NEVER mention a bending restriction but this question persists. Where did it come from and why won’t it go away?

The where it came from is easy: in the past (more than 20 years ago) cataract surgery involved making a very large incision that was almost 180 degrees across the top of the eye. While there are some surgeons who have STILL not adapted the newer techniques, 99% make a very small incision (only 2.4 mm in my case). When the incision was much larger, bending over during the healing process put stress on that large incision and the many sutures required to close it.

Modern cataract surgery is generally done without stitches, patches or shots. That means that the restrictions after surgery are different too. For my patients I have only have 4 rules (besides what you do with the eye drops) for the first two weeks after cataract surgery: 1) no pushing on the eye, 2) no eye makeup, 3) no swimming and 4) do wear a plastic shield over the eye at night.

This only applies to my patients. Be sure that if you are having surgery with another ophthalmologist that you follow their instructions. That is good advice for any type of medical procedure, the instructions are intended help you have the best possible outcome. Now you can help me make this myth go away: be sure to read your post-operative instructions but don’t read too much into them!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK Vision correction.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


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