Recent posts

ANOTHER MASK ANNOYANCE: DRY EYES - Washington Post Article

By user-admin
September 10, 2020

Click on the photo to the left for a link to a Washington Post article about dry eyes and face masks.


Crying out for non-COVID news? See this article about animal tears!

By user-admin
August 13, 2020

Click on the image to the left for a link to a New York Times article concerning what we may learn about our tears from studying those of many different animals.


Washington Post Article for Those Complaining about Masks

By user-admin
July 15, 2020

Click on the image to the left for a link to a Washington Post article written by a surgeon about wearing masks. He explains how important they are in the operating room and urges those who complain about them to understand that it has long been a way of work life for surgeons. Basically his theses is QUIT COMPLAINING!


WHAT DOES 20/20 VISION REALLY MEAN? By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
July 8, 2020

The measurement of visual acuity is generally noted as the number 20 on the top and another number on the bottom of a fraction.  20/20 is considered normal vision.  If the bottom number is larger than 20, the vision is worse than normal.  For example, a person with 20/200 vision is seeing more poorly than someone with 20/30 vision.  Some fortunate people can actually see better than 20/20 (20/15 or even 20/10).  The best visual acuity thought achievable by a human is 20/8.

The minimum separation between two lines that the average person can see is 1 second of arc or 1/60 of a degree.  Using a mathematical formula, this translates into an 8.75 mm (0.35 inch) letter viewed from 20 feet away.  In other words, a person with 20/20 vision can read a 0.35 inch letter at 20 feet.  The best a person with 20/100 vision can read at 20 feet is only a 1.75 inch letter.  Stated in another way, a person with 20/100 vision would have to move into 20 feet to see the same sized letter that a person with 20/20 vision could see at 100 feet.

The visual acuity charts that we use are all based on these letter sizing calculations.  Herman Snellen was the ophthalmologist that invented the first standardized eye chart in 1862.  We still use similar charts to measure vision today.  While our vision charts are projected or digital, we still use a mirror to simulate a 20 foot long room.  So now you know what 20/20 means AND why we have mirrors in all our exam rooms.

At Madison Medical Eye Care our passion is to keep you seeing as close to 20/20 as possible for your entire life, not just in the year 2020!

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James is an Optometrist practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Lisa Bennett at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He provides comprehensive eye care for the whole family and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedical.com.


ARTHRITIS AND MACULAR DEGENERATION MAY BE RELATED By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 24, 2020

Two common conditions that increase in frequency with age are rheumatoid arthritis and macular degeneration of the eyes. A recent study in the medical journal Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science indicates that the two may be linked.

The medical claims of almost 75,000 patients over the age of 64 years-old were analyzed over a 5 year period.  Those with the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis were found to have a 91% chance of also carrying the diagnosis of macular degeneration. Those without rheumatoid arthritis were also likely to have macular degeneration, but only at a rate of 83%. This was statistically significant, meaning very unlikely to be due to chance. Remember that macular degeneration is leading cause for legal blindness for those over 65 years-old in the U.S.

Why or how could these seemingly disparate conditions, one involving the joints and the other the eyes, be related? While nothing can be proven by this study, the common link may be inflammation. We have long recommended that macular degeneration patients takes the AREDS2 vitamin supplements since a large study a number years ago indicated that it decreased the risk of transitioning from the mild “dry” form of the condition to the aggressive “wet” form. They contain antioxidants that theoretically protect the eye from the damages of aging. Perhaps they may also be found to aid in rheumatoid arthritis, only further studies can tell.

The good news for those with both rheumatoid arthritis and macular degeneration is that the association was with the milder “dry” form. For now, be sure to have regular eye examinations especially if you have rheumatoid arthritis and/or macular degeneration.

Dr. Martha Jay is a comprehensive Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) practicing with Dr. Lisa Bennett and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. She specialized in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedical.com.


Washington Post Article about COVID and the Eyes

By user-admin
June 22, 2020

Click on the image below for a link to the article:


TIME TO CONSIDER A LASER FOR YOUR GLAUCOMA? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 17, 2020

Many of you have glaucoma that is managed with eye drops. Generally this works quite well in maintaining your eye pressure and preserving your vision but sometimes either that is not the case or use of the drops is unpleasant due to side effects, expense or difficulty getting the drops in. Should that occur, then maybe it is time to consider a laser to control you glaucoma.

Laser treatments for glaucoma are nothing new, they have been around since the late 1970’s. In the past it was called an ALT (Argon Laser Trabeculoplasty) but more recently a different laser has been employed and it is called a SLT (Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty). The SLT has the advantage of being safer as far as increases in eye pressure while recovering and can be repeated if the effects start to wane.

This is not an operation but a procedure. We meet you at the Testing & Treatment area of Ascension Columbia-St. Mary’s Ozaukee Hospital. You put your head on something that looks like what we use for your eye examination in the office. A lens is placed over the eye that is being treated and we focus the laser in the small crevice behind your clear cornea and colored iris. It takes only minutes and is generally pain free.  We usually do one eye at a time.

It is good to have options for your eye care. If you are fine with your drops and you are not losing vision, stay with what works. If, however, you find using the drops a pain or too expensive or if they cause eye irritation it may be time to consider the SLT laser. We can discuss all your possible treatments at your next eye examination or sooner if you are having problems. We want to find what works best for you.

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. She specializes in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery, blade-free LASIK, glaucoma care, macular degeneration management, dry eye treatment and more.

For additional eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedical.com.


TOO BUSY FOR LASIK? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 10, 2020

Life is hectic, we get that.  But if you are thinking that you are too busy to have LASIK vision correction, think again.  Maybe you are too busy NOT to have LASIK!  This painless procedure takes less than 20 minutes from start to finish.  That’s less time than you spend dealing with your contact lenses in a single week.

Although you are in the laser suite for a total of 20 minutes, each laser runs for just a fraction of that time. In fact, the first laser takes just 6 seconds per eye.  That’s all the time it needs to place tiny air bubbles just under the surface of your eye creating a small corneal cap.  A second laser then changes the shape of the eye in about 15 to 30 seconds per eye. The result is great vision without glasses or contacts.

Following your quick procedure, you are sent home for a nice nap and awaken that same day to greatly improved vision. The very next morning you are greeted with an even better view on life. We recommend that you take both the day of the procedure and the day after the procedure off from work and your regular activities.  Generally most people see pretty well that next day so it becomes a free day, allowing you time to enjoy your new vision.

Let us help simplify your life with LASIK vision correction. To get started, call for your complimentary screening exam to see if this remarkable procedure is an option for you. We get to know you and your eyes; and take the time to explain that LASIK is not the same everywhere you go. You only want to have the procedure once so choose wisely.  Select a local doctor you can trust and one who uses the most precise, current and safest LASIK technology available.

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. She specializes in blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery.

For more eye care information or to schedule your LASIK screening, call 262-241-1919.


WHY DO I HAVE TO WEAR A MASK AT YOUR OFFICE? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 4, 2020

Madison Medical Eye care is doing all we can to protect our staff and patients during the COVID pandemic. While it may seem confusing to hear different messages from local and national government sources, be very aware that the risk of illness is still present and real even as the country opens up. Here you will find that all staff and patients are wearing masks in the office, all staff and patients are having their temperatures assessed upon arrival, all rooms are disinfected after each patient and contact time between staff and patients is being kept to a minimum. In addition, all surgical patients are having COVID testing 1-2 days before their procedures.

Thankfully, 99.9% of our patients have been grateful and understanding of our precautions. They fully understand that many of our patients are at a higher risk for the more severe complications or even death from the virus due to their advanced age and/or chronic medical problems such as heart disease or diabetes.  They even have impressed me with the variety of masks worn - the new fashion accessory!

Unfortunately, there is still that 0.1% who feel that the virus cannot affect them. Some have even gone so far as to berate our staff about complying with the precautions.  We are not making a political statement, we are responding to a health emergency. Realize that we will not tolerate verbal abuse of our valuable staff.

I look forward to seeing you with the “new normal” mask look into the foreseeable future. Not exactly the way I planned on riding out the end of my career but at least now I get to wear comfortable easy wash scrubs and tennis shoes to work, a silver lining?

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedical.com.


WHICH IMPLANT AT THE TIME OF CATARACT SURGERY? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 28, 2020

If you have cataracts, you probably already know that cataract surgery is a 10-15 minute outpatient procedure that is generally done without the need of shots, stitches or patches. What you may not know is that we always replace your natural lens with a small plastic implant as otherwise you would not be able to see without very thick glasses. There are several implants options available. Which is right for you depends on how dependent you want to be on glasses after the procedure. Another factor concerns astigmatism, or whether your eyes are round like a baseball or curved like a football.

If you do not have astigmatism and do not mind using over-the-counter reading glasses or going back into bifocals, then the standard lens is for you. This lens corrects your distance vision and is covered by your insurance minus any deductible you may have. If you do have astigmatism, then you might want to consider a Toric implant. This option would make your distance vision clearer without glasses than a standard lens but, as with the standard lens, you would need reading glasses.  How do you know if you have astigmatism? We determine that at the time of your cataract evaluation.

If you would prefer to be as glasses independent as possible, then you should consider a Multi-focal implant. In the past this lens was only available to those without astigmatism but now we can correct for the astigmatism, distance vision, intermediate vision and near vision all in one lens. There is an upcharge for both the Toric and Multi-focal implants. You only have cataract surgery once so you want to choose wisely.      At your cataract evaluation we will thoroughly discuss your implant options and help you select the one best suited for your visual needs.  While non-urgent surgeries such as cataracts have been delayed, we are not starting to slowly and safely begin to re-schedule them.

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. She specializes in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedical.com.

 


Stay Connected


We want to hear from you