Recent posts

WHICH IMPLANT AT THE TIME OF CATARACT SURGERY? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 28, 2020

If you have cataracts, you probably already know that cataract surgery is a 10-15 minute outpatient procedure that is generally done without the need of shots, stitches or patches. What you may not know is that we always replace your natural lens with a small plastic implant as otherwise you would not be able to see without very thick glasses. There are several implants options available. Which is right for you depends on how dependent you want to be on glasses after the procedure. Another factor concerns astigmatism, or whether your eyes are round like a baseball or curved like a football.

If you do not have astigmatism and do not mind using over-the-counter reading glasses or going back into bifocals, then the standard lens is for you. This lens corrects your distance vision and is covered by your insurance minus any deductible you may have. If you do have astigmatism, then you might want to consider a Toric implant. This option would make your distance vision clearer without glasses than a standard lens but, as with the standard lens, you would need reading glasses.  How do you know if you have astigmatism? We determine that at the time of your cataract evaluation.

If you would prefer to be as glasses independent as possible, then you should consider a Multi-focal implant. In the past this lens was only available to those without astigmatism but now we can correct for the astigmatism, distance vision, intermediate vision and near vision all in one lens. There is an upcharge for both the Toric and Multi-focal implants. You only have cataract surgery once so you want to choose wisely.      At your cataract evaluation we will thoroughly discuss your implant options and help you select the one best suited for your visual needs.  While non-urgent surgeries such as cataracts have been delayed, we are not starting to slowly and safely begin to re-schedule them.

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. She specializes in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedical.com.

 


“TOP DOCS” AGAIN IN THE MILWAUKEE MAGAZINE SURVEY By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 14, 2020

Once again, all of the doctors at Madison Medical Eye Care have made the list of “Top Docs” in the Milwaukee Magazine survey! Even our newest addition, Dr. Lisa Bennett, made the list. That’s a testimony to what a positive impression she has made since her arrival last year. Check out the May issue for primary care doctors and specialists in the Milwaukee area who were selected by their peers as outstanding health care providers.

We have lots of company in the survey with our colleagues at Madison Medical Affiliates. Those doctors made the list in Endocrinology, Dermatology, Colon & Rectal Surgery, Breast Surgery, Gastroenterology, General Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Sleep Medicine, Urology and Vascular Surgery.  We are very pleased to be in the company of such well respected physicians.

While we all joined Madison Medical Affiliates in January of 2018, there is now another Ophthalmology practice in the group: Drs. Fabric, Shafrin and Bloom joined Madison Medical Affiliates last year. Their office is in Glendale and gives you even more opportunities to see “Top Docs.”

While survey results are nice, the real purpose of our day is providing our patients with the best possible vision whether it is through glasses, contact lenses, refractive surgery or cataract surgery. Dr. Jay, Dr. Bennett and myself provide comprehensive eye care for the whole family and accept most insurance plans. For more eye care information, visit our web site noted below.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an optometrist practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Lisa Bennett. He provides comprehensive eye care for the whole family and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedical.com.


PARTIAL RE-OPENING OF MADISON MEDICAL EYE CARE By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 14, 2020

We have missed you these last few months! While tele-health visits have been an adventure they are no substitute for an actual eye examination. Up until now those in-person visits have been reserved for patients with true emergent eye problems such as possible retinal detachments. On those rare occasions everyone, including the patients, have worn masks. All parts of the exam room and office have been thoroughly disinfected before and after each patient. Our parking lot has been turned into the waiting room and the cell phone our way to communicate with patients about their reasons for the visit and reviewing medical histories.

We are now starting to slowly open up to non-urgent care but at a significantly reduced traffic flow. We will use what we have learned over the last few months to assure that our patients and staff remain safe. All staff from the front desk, technicians, doctors and billing staff will continue to wear masks all day. Patients will also wear masks of their own supply. All patients will be screened for respiratory symptoms prior to the appointment and their appointments will be rescheduled should there be any question of their health. Contact with staff will be minimized. Contact with other patients non-existent or at most minimal.

As for those who have had their eye surgeries delayed, we are now slowly opening to elective surgeries at Ascension Columbia-St. Mary’s Ozaukee.  As cataract surgery is not a life and death procedure, our patients have been very understanding in allowing more urgent procedures to take precedent up until now. We have already started contacting those whose surgeries have been delayed for rescheduling..

The “new normal” is certainly not what we thought the year 2020 would be.  We adapt, we move forward. We will see you when we see you…

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery, blade-free LASIK and more. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919.


ASTIGMATISM EXPLAINED By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin,

By user-admin
March 11, 2020

Are your eyes more like a football or a baseball?

Astigmatism refers to the curvature of the surface of your eye.  If your eye is round like a baseball, you do not have astigmatism and can quit reading now!  But if the front of your eye has a curvature, making it shaped more like a football than a baseball, then you have astigmatism.

Generally patients don’t realize they have astigmatism.  We may mention it when we determine your glasses prescription but often we just write the prescription to compensate for it.

Serious discussions of astigmatism generally start when a patient is considering cataract surgery, LASIK vision correction or contact lenses.  There are special Toric contacts available for those with astigmatism and often they work quite well.  Many, however, find that toric contacts don’t provide consistent vision as they tend to rotate on the eye with blinking.

There is a common misconception that you cannot have LASIK if you have astigmatism but this is absolutely not true.  In fact this is actually a frequent reason for patients to elect to have LASIK as they are unhappy with their vision in glasses or contact lenses.

If you have astigmatism and cataracts, we can insert Toric implants at the time of surgery to improve your vision. More recently, Bifocal Toric implants have become available, now making bifocal implants an option for those with astigmatism.

Still confused?  Call for a complete eye examination and we will determine if you have significant astigmatism and how best to compensate for it.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an Optometrist providing comprehensive eye care for the whole family. He practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Lisa Bennett at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


ABOUT PUPILLARY DISTANCE (PD) By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 6, 2020

Online purchasing of eyeglasses has become much more popular in the past few years. Many people are coming in to our office are asking for their “PD.” The PD (inter-pupillary distance) is the distance measured from the center of one pupil to the center of the other pupil. This measurement is done in millimeters with a ruler, a device called a pupilometer, or by using your computer/phone camera.

This measurement has been somewhat trivialized by the online glasses industry in recent years. The PD is a measurement that is crucial to making glasses correctly. This measurement is even more critical with strong glasses prescriptions. Optometrists and ophthalmologists are the doctors that prescribe the correct prescription to be put in the lenses. Opticians (professionals that fit and make eyeglasses) have always been the professionals that measure the PD. This leaves consumers and doctors trying to figure out who is responsible for the PD measurement when glasses are ordered online.

The PD needs to be measured differently according to the type of lenses that are being put in the frame. A different PD measurement will be done for progressive lenses, reading glasses, or distance glasses.

As online glasses sites are becoming more popular, they are offering consumers easier online tools to measure their own PD. At our office, since we do not make or sell eyeglasses, we generally advise people to use online tools at home to measure their own PD. If the prescription is strong, or if bifocals are being ordered, we still recommend seeking the professional help of local opticians to measure the PD correctly.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an optometrist practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Lisa Bennett at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


OUR MOST FREQUENT DIAGNOSIS: BLEPHARITIS By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 28, 2020

What is the most frequent diagnosis in our eye clinic? You might guess cataracts or glaucoma but it is actually an intermittent eyelid infection known as blepharitis. The symptoms include redness or swelling of the eyelids, flakes on the lashes, misdirected or loss of lashes, burning, itching, a foreign body sensation, irritation and/or tearing.  There are about 50 small sweat glands at the edge of your eyelids that can harbor bacteria resulting in this recurrent problem.

What causes blepharitis?  The most common causes are bacteria (staphylococcal blepharitis) and skin conditions like dandruff or acne rosacea (seborrheic blepharitis).  Rarely, allergies, a mite infestation or viruses can be the culprit.

Blepharitis is diagnosed by ophthalmologists or optometrists through a thorough history of symptoms, evaluation of the eyelids and eyes along with a careful evaluation of the tear film.  Untreated blepharitis can cause dry eyes to worsen, permanent loss of lashes, notches in the eyelid, styes and, in worst case scenarios, even scarring of the cornea.

Treatment depends on the type of blepharitis.  Eyelid hygiene typically helps for most types of blepharitis: this includes warm compresses over the eyelids daily, gentle cleansing of the eyelashes with a non-irritating soap (baby shampoo) and the use of artificial tears.  Some types of blepharitis require prescription eye drops, ointments or oral antibiotics.

While this condition is common and annoying, understanding the cause and knowing how to manage the symptoms is key.  We can help you determine the appropriate treatment for your particular situation at your next appointment or sooner should your symptoms become more severe.

Dr. Lisa Bennett practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. She is a comprehensive Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


HOW MUCH TIME SHOULD YOU TAKE OFF FOR CATARACT SURGERY? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 19, 2020

We often find that patients over estimate how disruptive cataract surgery will be to their routine. They wait until they have absolutely nothing planned for weeks before they call to schedule their surgery. Really cataract surgery only takes two days off your regular activities: the day of the surgery and the day after. On the day of surgery you do need a driver to pick you up from the hospital, due to mild sedation used, but if you live alone you do not need anyone to stay with you. The next day we generally see you in the office but many people drive themselves to that appointment. It’s a good idea to clear your schedule on that day while you adjust to your new eyes.

You will be using eye drops to aid in healing but they are all combined in one bottle so you no longer have to fuss with three separate bottles. If you are worried about being able to do the drops yourself, we have a number of helpful tips and can give you a tear sample to practice ahead of time.

We do our best to accommodate your appointments around what works for you. We do one eye at a time, generally waiting 2-4 weeks between the surgeries. If getting driver on the day of surgery is an issue, many either drive themselves and get picked up or do a “tag team” with one person dropping them off and another picking them up.   You are usually at the hospital about three hours.

See, that’s not so disruptive to your schedule. Especially when you consider all the annoyances of avoiding night driving as your cataracts progress.  Hopefully this gives you a more realistic understanding about how much time you need to set aside for your cataract surgery – not much!

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WINTER IS LASIK SEASON By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 12, 2020

Winter in Wisconsin leaves us dreaming of our favorite summer activities that seem so far away: enjoying our lakes and pools, blasting out on that Harley, biking the Interurban trail and much more.  While you cannot make winter disappear, there is something you can do now to enhance your summer fun – improve your outlook on life with LASIK Vision Correction!  Winter is always our busiest time for LASIK because this is a procedure for active people, not couch potatoes.  Most prefer to take advantage of this down time to finally get free of their contacts and glasses.

We now exclusively utilize the all-laser Wavelight blade-free LASIK system.  They are the fastest lasers available in the US for refractive surgery and the most precise. The first laser, that makes the tiny flap on the surface of the eye, takes only 6 seconds.  The second laser, that contours the shape of your eyes to improve your vision, is also 50% quicker that the older technologies.  This means less time you need to stay still under the laser and quicker healing. The improvement in vision, especially for those with more extreme prescriptions, is quite evident.

Patients love the improved comfort and potential to see even better than they did with glasses or contacts. I appreciate the precise automation with the smallest laser spot size in the industry and fastest eye tracking system available:  20 times faster than natural eye movements!

Don’t just dream of summer, have LASIK now so when it does arrive you will be ready to fully embrace it.  Get started by calling for your complementary LASIK screening exam today to determine if LASIK is for you.

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WHICH IMPLANT AT THE TIME OF CATARACT SURGERY? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 7, 2020

If you have cataracts, you probably already know that cataract surgery is a 10-15 minute outpatient procedure that is generally done without the need of shots, stitches or patches. What you may not know is that we always replace your natural lens with a small plastic implant as otherwise you would not be able to see without very thick glasses. There are several implants options available. Which is right for you depends on how dependent you want to be on glasses after the procedure. Another factor concerns astigmatism, or whether your eyes are round like a baseball or curved like a football.

If you do not have astigmatism and do not mind using over-the-counter reading glasses or going back into bifocals, then the standard lens is for you. This lens corrects your distance vision and is covered by your insurance minus any deductible you may have. If you do have astigmatism, then you might want to consider a Toric implant. This option would make your distance vision clearer without glasses than a standard lens but, as with the standard lens, you would need reading glasses.  How do you know if you have astigmatism? We determine that at the time of your cataract evaluation.

If you would prefer to be able to see far away and read without glasses, then you should consider a Bifocal implant. In the past this lens was only available to those without astigmatism but now we can correct for the astigmatism, distance vision and near vision all in one lens. The is an up-charge for both the Toric and Bifocal implant but you only have cataract surgery once so you want to choose wisely.

At your cataract evaluation we thoroughly discuss your implant options and help you select the one that best suits your visual needs. See you soon!

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She practices with Drs. Lisa Bennett and James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PRK AND LASIK? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 6, 2020

Most have heard of LASIK but PRK is less well known, even though it has been around longer. LASIK stands for Laser Assisted In-Situ Keratomileusis and PRK stands for Photorefractive Keratectomy.  You can see why we use the abbreviations!

With LASIK we use two lasers instead of one. The first makes a tiny flap on the surface of the eye which is then gently lifted. A second laser contours the surface of the eye to improve your vision without glasses. The tiny flap is returned to its original position and there is relatively little, if any, pain. With PRK we start by removing the very thin outside layer of your cornea, called the epithelium. Then, as with LASIK, a laser is used to contour the surface of the eye.  We place a contact lens over the eye to aid in healing. There may be some pain as the eye heals.

PRK first became FDA approved in the U.S. in 1995. So at first this was the only laser refractive procedure available for those who wanted to improve their vision without glasses. While it was somewhat painful, the results were much better than with Radial Keratotomy (RK) which was the only other option at the time. By 1999, LASIK became FDA approved representing a major improvement over PRK as far a quicker healing and very little pain.

While not generally our first choice, PRK may be the only laser refractive option for some patients. If your cornea is too thin for LASIK, many can still have an excellent refractive result with PRK. Instead of very good vision on day one as with LASIK, it may take 3-4 days but you still get there. Which is right for you? We can let you know at your no-obligation, complimentary, personalized LASIK screening exam. Call today to get started on improving your outlook on life!

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


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