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HOW MUCH TIME SHOULD YOU TAKE OFF FOR CATARACT SURGERY? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 19, 2020

We often find that patients over estimate how disruptive cataract surgery will be to their routine. They wait until they have absolutely nothing planned for weeks before they call to schedule their surgery. Really cataract surgery only takes two days off your regular activities: the day of the surgery and the day after. On the day of surgery you do need a driver to pick you up from the hospital, due to mild sedation used, but if you live alone you do not need anyone to stay with you. The next day we generally see you in the office but many people drive themselves to that appointment. It’s a good idea to clear your schedule on that day while you adjust to your new eyes.

You will be using eye drops to aid in healing but they are all combined in one bottle so you no longer have to fuss with three separate bottles. If you are worried about being able to do the drops yourself, we have a number of helpful tips and can give you a tear sample to practice ahead of time.

We do our best to accommodate your appointments around what works for you. We do one eye at a time, generally waiting 2-4 weeks between the surgeries. If getting driver on the day of surgery is an issue, many either drive themselves and get picked up or do a “tag team” with one person dropping them off and another picking them up.   You are usually at the hospital about three hours.

See, that’s not so disruptive to your schedule. Especially when you consider all the annoyances of avoiding night driving as your cataracts progress.  Hopefully this gives you a more realistic understanding about how much time you need to set aside for your cataract surgery – not much!

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WINTER IS LASIK SEASON By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 12, 2020

Winter in Wisconsin leaves us dreaming of our favorite summer activities that seem so far away: enjoying our lakes and pools, blasting out on that Harley, biking the Interurban trail and much more.  While you cannot make winter disappear, there is something you can do now to enhance your summer fun – improve your outlook on life with LASIK Vision Correction!  Winter is always our busiest time for LASIK because this is a procedure for active people, not couch potatoes.  Most prefer to take advantage of this down time to finally get free of their contacts and glasses.

We now exclusively utilize the all-laser Wavelight blade-free LASIK system.  They are the fastest lasers available in the US for refractive surgery and the most precise. The first laser, that makes the tiny flap on the surface of the eye, takes only 6 seconds.  The second laser, that contours the shape of your eyes to improve your vision, is also 50% quicker that the older technologies.  This means less time you need to stay still under the laser and quicker healing. The improvement in vision, especially for those with more extreme prescriptions, is quite evident.

Patients love the improved comfort and potential to see even better than they did with glasses or contacts. I appreciate the precise automation with the smallest laser spot size in the industry and fastest eye tracking system available:  20 times faster than natural eye movements!

Don’t just dream of summer, have LASIK now so when it does arrive you will be ready to fully embrace it.  Get started by calling for your complementary LASIK screening exam today to determine if LASIK is for you.

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WHICH IMPLANT AT THE TIME OF CATARACT SURGERY? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 7, 2020

If you have cataracts, you probably already know that cataract surgery is a 10-15 minute outpatient procedure that is generally done without the need of shots, stitches or patches. What you may not know is that we always replace your natural lens with a small plastic implant as otherwise you would not be able to see without very thick glasses. There are several implants options available. Which is right for you depends on how dependent you want to be on glasses after the procedure. Another factor concerns astigmatism, or whether your eyes are round like a baseball or curved like a football.

If you do not have astigmatism and do not mind using over-the-counter reading glasses or going back into bifocals, then the standard lens is for you. This lens corrects your distance vision and is covered by your insurance minus any deductible you may have. If you do have astigmatism, then you might want to consider a Toric implant. This option would make your distance vision clearer without glasses than a standard lens but, as with the standard lens, you would need reading glasses.  How do you know if you have astigmatism? We determine that at the time of your cataract evaluation.

If you would prefer to be able to see far away and read without glasses, then you should consider a Bifocal implant. In the past this lens was only available to those without astigmatism but now we can correct for the astigmatism, distance vision and near vision all in one lens. The is an up-charge for both the Toric and Bifocal implant but you only have cataract surgery once so you want to choose wisely.

At your cataract evaluation we thoroughly discuss your implant options and help you select the one that best suits your visual needs. See you soon!

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She practices with Drs. Lisa Bennett and James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PRK AND LASIK? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 6, 2020

Most have heard of LASIK but PRK is less well known, even though it has been around longer. LASIK stands for Laser Assisted In-Situ Keratomileusis and PRK stands for Photorefractive Keratectomy.  You can see why we use the abbreviations!

With LASIK we use two lasers instead of one. The first makes a tiny flap on the surface of the eye which is then gently lifted. A second laser contours the surface of the eye to improve your vision without glasses. The tiny flap is returned to its original position and there is relatively little, if any, pain. With PRK we start by removing the very thin outside layer of your cornea, called the epithelium. Then, as with LASIK, a laser is used to contour the surface of the eye.  We place a contact lens over the eye to aid in healing. There may be some pain as the eye heals.

PRK first became FDA approved in the U.S. in 1995. So at first this was the only laser refractive procedure available for those who wanted to improve their vision without glasses. While it was somewhat painful, the results were much better than with Radial Keratotomy (RK) which was the only other option at the time. By 1999, LASIK became FDA approved representing a major improvement over PRK as far a quicker healing and very little pain.

While not generally our first choice, PRK may be the only laser refractive option for some patients. If your cornea is too thin for LASIK, many can still have an excellent refractive result with PRK. Instead of very good vision on day one as with LASIK, it may take 3-4 days but you still get there. Which is right for you? We can let you know at your no-obligation, complimentary, personalized LASIK screening exam. Call today to get started on improving your outlook on life!

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


HISTORY OF CONTACT LENSES By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 5, 2020

Contact lenses were first invented by a German glass blower, F.A. Muller, in 1887. Adolph E. Flick, a French physician, successfully fit the first glass contact lens on the human eye in 1888. Contact lenses evolved to become a mainstream vision correction device with the invention of PMMA hard plastic contact lenses by Kevin Tuohy, a California optician, in 1948. A giant breakthrough occurred in 1959 when Czech chemists Otto Wichterle and Drahoslav Lim invented hydrogel plastic. This new plastic product led to the first soft contact lens to be introduced by Bausch & Lomb in 1971.

Contact lenses are now used routinely to correct for vision problems just like glasses. Soft and gas permeable contacts are used for people that are nearsighted, farsighted, have astigmatism or need bifocal correction.

Specialty contact lenses can be used to help medical problems of the eye as well. Gas permeable (hard) contact lenses can be used to help people that have irregular corneas. Larger gas permeable contacts, called scleral lenses, can be used to help conditions like severe dry eye or contact lens intolerance. Contact lenses can be even used as a bandage for corneal abrasions.

Future applications for contact lenses may include drug delivery systems for eye diseases like glaucoma. Microchips may be implanted in contacts to monitor eye health conditions or even transmit video directly to the eye. The future is quite bright for these little pieces of plastic invented over a hundred years ago! Interested in contact lenses? Call for an appointment and we will determine the best option is for you.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices comprehensive optometry at Madison Medical Eye Care. He particularly welcomes hard-to-fit contact lens patients and accepts most insurance plans.  For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


HAVE GLAUCOMA? GET OUT AND EXERCISE! By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 3, 2020

We all know that exercise is great for your heart but did you know that it may help you retain your vision if you have glaucoma? A recent study published in the medical journal Ophthalmology suggests just that.  The activity level of 141 patients with glaucoma was followed for one week with a step monitor.  The devices measured how vigorous the patient's activities were and how much of each day they were active. They then analyzed the patient's glaucoma progression for over 10 years before and 5 years after the activity assessment.  There was a correlation between increased levels of physical activity and better control of the glaucoma as measured by visual field or side vision testing.

So the take home message is that not only should you be taking your glaucoma drops as recommended and coming for your regularly scheduled appointments but you should also get off the couch and get active! Don't let winter be your excuse, join a gym or walk at the mall.  Most likely the reason exercise appears to aid in glaucoma is probably due to a healthier cardiovascular system which in turn provides more oxygen to your eyes as well as the rest of your body.

Glaucoma is still a major contributor to vision loss in the United States.  Even if you have never been told that you are at risk for glaucoma, you should have regular complete eye examinations at least every one to two years to be sure you have not developed this condition. It is easily treated with eye drops, lasers or surgery. Early diagnosis is key, however, to preserving your vision. And now we know that staying active helps too!

Dr. Lisa is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She practices with Drs. Martha Jay and James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


NOW TWO YEARS AS PART OF MADISON MEDICAL AFFILIATES By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
January 27, 2020

Patients often ask how we are doing now as of Madison Medical Affiliates. We were an independent ophthalmology/optometry practice for over 25 years at the time of the merger so it certainly is a valid question! Just two short years ago all the doctors at what was known as Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals did join Madison Medical Affiliates. We can assure you that the transition was very smooth even at the start.  We were able to remain in both our Mequon and Saukville offices, our phone numbers were unchanged and, most importantly, we were able to continue to provide you with the most advanced medical and surgical eye care available.

What did change is now we are part of a multi-specialty group that for over 100 years has been been providing high quality health care in the Milwaukee area. Madison Medical Affiliates now have more than 50 physicians in 12 specialties and 8 locations.  Don’t make the mistake of thinking they have anything to do with Madison, Wisconsin however! The practice was started in Milwaukee by Dr. J.D. Madison in 1903 and he was later joined by his nephew, Fred Madison. The rest is history.

What also changed is now we have more doctors. Dr. Lisa Bennett joined us in August and quickly became an integral member of our team. Like myself, she M.D./Ophthalmologist who is an accomplished cataract and LASIK surgeon. She manages patients with all types of medical and surgical eye problems like dry eyes, macular degeneration, glaucoma and more. Dr. James Ivanoski rounds out our team. He is an Optometrist specializing in comprehensive eye care for the whole family with a particular interest in hard-to-fit contact lens patients.

We are very grateful to you, our patients, for your tremendous support over the years and look forward to another great year in 2020 and beyond.  See you soon!

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


HOLIDAY LIGHT HALOS By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Suakville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
December 9, 2019

Holiday season is here along with many displays of decorative exterior lighting.  While they can be quite beautiful, sometimes how the holiday lights appear can alert you that something might not be quite right with your vision.

Starbursts and halos are a common vision complaint when looking at holiday lights or even headlights all year long.  We use the term “starburst” to describe what you see when a pinpoint of light appears to have radiating spokes coming off it. The term “halo” describes when you see circles around a light source. Both symptoms can be due to something as benign as not having the most up-to-date glasses or contact lens prescription to more serious problems such as cataracts. If you are noticing these symptoms, during the holiday season or anytime during the year, your first move is to call us for a comprehensive eye examination so we can determine the cause and take care of it.

Cataracts are a clouding of the lens in the front of the eye, behind the colored iris.  They can make lights appear dim, cause glare or make colors appear dull.  Cataracts are removed with a 10 minute outpatient surgery generally these days without shots, stitches or patches. The surgery involves replacing the cloudy lens with a clear plastic lens implant.  There are a number of options for these implants which will be discussed should this be found to be your problem.

Take time this holiday season to enjoy the many wonderful lighting displays.  But if the lights appear a little different this year, consider getting an eye examination. Your problem could be cataracts but it could also just be that your glasses need updating or that you have dry eyes. Have a very happy holiday season!

Dr. Lisa Bennett if an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans. She practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


GIVE THANKS FOR GOOD VISION By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
November 7, 2019

Most of us pretty much take our vision for granted but maintaining good vision does take some effort on your part. You should be sure to have a complete eye examination with dilating drops at least every two years.  If you have diabetes, then you should come in every year.  We generally see glaucoma patients every six months.  Warning signs that would warrant an immediate eye examination include eye pain, light sensitivity, blurred vision, and loss of side vision or an increase in floaters.

You may have good vision but what about your relatives or neighbors?  If you are starting to think about holiday gifts, consider something that would make their lives easier.  They probably have enough “stuff” but might really benefit from a ride to the store, doctor’s appointment or just an outing for some fun.  There are options, although limited, to get around if you don’t drive in Ozaukee County.  But the loss of freedom is pretty distressing to many seniors who can no longer drive due to impaired vision or other medical problems.

The above is just something to reflect upon during the Thanksgiving holiday season.  And while you are at it, don’t forget to schedule those eye appointments for yourself and your family!  Remember that we provide advanced medical and surgical eye care for patients of all ages including complete eye examinations, contact lens fitting, LASIK vision correction and small incision cataract surgery. We are certainly thankful for all our wonderful patients at Madison Medical Eye Care and wish a joyous Thanksgiving holiday to one and all.

Dr. Lisa Bennett practices comprehensive ophthalmology at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans. Dr. Bennett specializes in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery, LASIK vision correction, macular degeneration, dry eyes, glaucoma and more.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


New YorK Times Article: Those Puppy Eyes You Can't Resist? Thank Evolution!

By user-admin
October 31, 2019

Click on the photo to the left for a link to a New York Times articles about those puppy eye!


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