Recent posts

PRE-ECLAMPSIA RELATED TO RETINAL DETACHMENTS LATER IN LIFE

By user-admin
January 11, 2017

Click on the image to the left for a link to a New York Times articles reporting on a recent study linking pre-eclampsia during pregnancy to eye problems, such as retinal detachments, and other medical problems later in life.


WINTER IS LASIK SEASON By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
January 10, 2017

January in Wisconsin leaves us dreaming of our favorite summer activities that seem so far away: enjoying our lakes and pools, blasting out on that Harley, biking the Interurban trail and much more. While you cannot make winter disappear, there is something you can do now to enhance your summer fun – improve your outlook on life with LASIK Vision Correction! Winter is always our busiest time for LASIK because this is a procedure for active people, not couch potatoes. Most prefer to take advantage of this down time to finally get free of their contacts and glasses.

We have been using our new Wavelight blade-free LASIK laser system for a little over a year now and have been very impressed with the results. The lasers are not just faster than prior technology, they are also more precise. The improvement in vision, especially for those with more extreme prescriptions, is even better than before. They also open up LASIK to many who may not have been candidates in the past because they can treat the widest range of prescriptions of any laser available.
Patients love the improved comfort and potential to see even better than they did with glasses or contacts. I appreciate the precise automation with the smallest laser spot size in the industry and fastest eye tracking system available: 20 times faster than natural eye movements!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Don’t just dream of summer, have LASIK now so when it does arrive you will be ready to fully embrace it. Get started by calling for your complementary LASIK screening exam today to determine if LASIK is for you.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified Eye Physician and Surgeon specializing in LASIK Vision Correction and small incision cataract surgery.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


WHY ARE CORNEAL ABRASIONS SO PAINFUL? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
January 2, 2017
This may have happened to you: A sudden onset of intense pain in one eye, light sensitivity and copious tearing. It may even feel like there is something in your eye. You go in for an evaluation with your eye care professional and find out that you have a tiny scratch on the surface of your eye. Why should such a tiny injury hurt so much? The answer is that the cornea, or clear part of the front of your eye, has the highest density of sensory nerve fibers of any part of the body. The pain from a huge abrasion may not feel that much worse than a little scratch. The pain will persist until the injury has become initially healed.
The cornea is a layered structure. The outer layer is called the epithelium and this is the layer that is usually affected by an abrasion. Abrasions can be caused by dryness, accidental injury (baby fingernails are a common culprit), removing a contact lens too roughly or from a small particle flying in your eye. We generally treat them with lubrication in the form of artificial tears and antibiotic drops to prevent infection. We usually recommend NOT wearing contact lenses until the injury has healed. An exception would be if the abrasion is particularly large, then a bandage contact lens may be applied and left on day and night for several days.
Once the pain resolves, you are still not completely healed as the surface epithelium has to lay “footplates” down to the layer below. This can take up to 6 weeks so eye rubbing is strictly forbidden during that time or you risk the problems starting all over again. Most abrasions heal well but can be quite miserable in the meantime. Remember we are here to help should this happen to you.
Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK vision correction. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


HOLIDAY LIGHT HALOS By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
December 20, 2016

Holiday season is here, and the beautiful lights are outside everywhere. It is a great time to be thankful for good vision. Sometimes the holiday lights can alert us that something may not be right with our vision.
Starbursts are a common vision complaint when looking at lights. This makes the small pinpoint lights look like they have streaks of light coming off of them. Uncorrected or under corrected glasses or contact lens prescriptions may be the culprit for this. Astigmatism is caused by the irregular curvature of the cornea or the lens in the eye, and is a cause for starburst appearance of lights. Astigmatism symptoms may be alleviated with glasses, contact lenses, or surgery like LASIK.
Cataracts are the clouding of the crystalline lens inside of the eye. Cataracts can cause lights to appear dim, to cause more glare, or for the colors to appear more dull. Cataracts are removed with cataract surgery. Cataract surgery usually includes replacing the cloudy lens with a clear plastic lens implant. This usually greatly improves vision again, and makes those holiday light colors more vibrant.
Halos around lights can be caused by many things including dry eye, cornea problems, cataracts or glaucoma. Some of these problems may require urgent attention.
Take time this holiday season to enjoy the wonderful light displays. If the light displays are looking a little different, consider getting an eye examination. Have a very happy holiday season!

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. Ivanoski practices comprehensive optometry at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Drs. Martha Jay and Mark German. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.
For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


Older Adults Still Skipping Vaccinations, Especially for Shingles

By user-admin
December 14, 2016

Click on the image to the left to read a New York Times article about the importance of vaccinations in older adults, especially for shingles.  If you are over 50 years-old, ask you doctor about the shingles vaccine and possible save yourself from this unpleasant condition that commonly affects the eye area.


WHAT’S NEW IN GLAUCOMA TREATMENT? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
November 28, 2016

Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss and is generally managed with eye drops. Now there is good news for those of you who are contemplating cataract surgery and also have glaucoma: The iStent. This tiny device can be placed in the eye at the time of cataract surgery to better control eye pressure. The eye is like a tiny plumbing system.  There is a small amount of fluid constantly entering the eye from behind the pupil and then leaving it at the edges of the eye, in front of the colored iris. This fluid is called “aqueous humour” and it is completely replenished every one to two hours.

Eye drops are the most common treatment for glaucoma. The eye drops either decrease how fast the fluid enters the eye or increase how quickly it leaves. Common eye drops that decrease the inflow are Timolol, Brimonidine and Dorzolamide. The most commonly prescribed eye drop that increases the outflow is Latanoprost.  The iStent is a tiny tube (measuring only 1 mm by 0.3 mm) that is placed in front of the iris at the edge of the eye to allow the aqueous humour to leave faster. It is the smallest implantable device in medicine.

The iStent can only be placed at the time of cataract surgery so you need to have both cataracts and mild to moderate glaucoma. If your glaucoma is very severe, you might need more extensive surgery than the iStent provides. It is made of titanium and is not magnetic so won’t interfere with your ability to have a MRI later in life.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Sounds confusing? We can talk about this more at your next eye examination. The goal of the iStent is to get you off some or all of your glaucoma medications. In the meantime, keep taking your drops as we have prescribed them and continue to have regular follow-up examinations.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeshoreVision.com.


Bonobos Could Sure Use Some Glasses!

By user-admin
November 10, 2016

Click on the photo below to see a video from the New York Times about older Bonobo Apes pulling away as they get older to find those lice on their friends! Why don't they just get some reading glasses??


NOVEMBER IS DIABETIC EYE DISEASE MONTH By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 31, 2016
The Wisconsin Council of the Blind and Visually Impaired recognizes November as “Diabetic Eye Disease Month.” The purpose of this designation is to increase awareness about how diabetes can potentially affect your eyes and how to prevent it.
We like to see diabetics at least yearly for a complete eye examination. That includes dilating drops so we can look into the back of your eyes to evaluate your retinas. We are looking for abnormal blood vessels, bleeding or swelling of this delicate tissue. If these problems are detected early, treatments such as lasers or injections are more effective.
Vision loss from diabetic eye disease is preventable. Tight control of your blood sugar is the key. This means carefully monitoring at home and/or at your doctor’s office. The hemoglobin A1c is a simple blood test that measures of how well controlled your blood sugars have been over the prior 90 days. Primary care physicians generally like to see values on this test in the 6 range. Of equal importance is early detection of diabetic eye disease as that improves your chances of protecting your vision.
We stay in close contact with your primary care physician with annual reports about your eyes so they can be fully aware if diabetes has affected them. The eyes actually serve as a “window” into the rest of your body: Diabetes has the potential of affecting small blood vessels elsewhere such as the heart, kidneys and feet. If your eyes are free if diabetic changes, then that is generally good news for the rest of you.
Are you a diabetic and have gone more than a year since your last eye examination? Time to call to set one up, see you soon!
Dr. Mark E. German Dr. Mark German is an Optometrist practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.
For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

TOP 10 CONTACT LENS DO'S AND DON'TS By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 25, 2016

TOP 10 CONTACT LENS DO’S AND DON’TS

  1. Do not wear them when your eyes are red or irritated.  Wearing contacts with irritated eyes will most likely make things worse.
  2. Try not to swim with them in.  Wearing contacts while swimming can make it easier to get an eye infection or have irritation from chlorine.
  3. Take them out every night unless you are told that it is ok to sleep with them in by your eye doctor.  Leaving contacts in overnight increases likelihood for infection.
  4. Replace your disinfecting solution in the case daily.
  5. Rinse your contact lens case with hot water, let it air dry daily, and thoroughly clean your contact lens case weekly.
  6. Replace your contact lens case quarterly.  Serious eye infections can result from old dirty contact lens cases.
  7. Replace soft disposable contact lenses on a schedule prescribed by your eye doctor.  Wearing older dirty contacts increases risk of infection or inflammation.
  8. Get an eye exam yearly.  The eye health has to be assessed to make sure the contact lens is not causing any problems.
  9. Never store them in tap water.

10.  Always handle the contacts with clean hands.

Most of the time contact lenses provide excellent vision, and if they are worn like your eye doctor prescribed should provide a healthy alternative to glasses.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. Ivanoski practices comprehensive Optometry at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


HALLOWEEN EYE HAZARDS By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 17, 2016

Halloween is such a great time of the year…the beautiful fall colors, the crispness in the air, the endless candy supply and of course the cute children in the Halloween costumes.  However, with all the fun, there could be some potential eye hazards that are important to be aware of.

A popular costume trend of late is the decorative contact lens. Because people can buy them over the counter or on the internet, it is believed that a contact lens fitting or proper care is not necessary. This is WRONG.  Unfortunately, these “one size fits all” novelty contacts are not professionally fitted and could cause pain, infections, scratches or even permanent corneal scarring and vision loss.  It is important to realize that these costume products are being sold illegally and are not FDA-approved. By federal law ALL contact lenses are considered to be a medical device, only to be distributed by licensed eye-care professionals after determining the proper fit and prescription.

Other Halloween activities can also lead to eye injuries.  Unfortunately, what may seem like a harmless traditional game, like apple bobbing, could lead to scratches on the surface of the eye and infections from dirty water.  Lanterns and glow sticks can also cause dangerous but avoidable accidents. Hitting the edge of a lantern may lead to a corneal abrasion or the chemicals within a broken glow stick could damage the eye.

This holiday just take a little bit of extra care while having fun!  Happy Halloween from all of us at Lakeshore Eye Care!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


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