Recent posts

CAN YOU BE AN EYE TECH? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 30, 2017

Do you have what it takes to become an ophthalmic or optometric technician?  Are you a "people person" who enjoys learning? Do you have some experience in healthcare? Are you looking for a well-paying job with benefits? Then maybe this is the career move you have been looking for.

Our technicians begin your eye examination and do a number of eye tests before you see the doctor. They measure your current glasses, do an initial check of your glasses prescription to see if your vision can be improved, check your eye pressure and put eye drops in along with a number of other activities.  They assist our ophthalmologist and optometrists every step of the way.

We provide continuing education to obtain certification from JCAHPO which stand for the "Joint Commission on Allied Health Personnel in Ophthalmology" - now you know why we abbreviate it! There are some degree programs for this field but most eye technicians started with on-the-job training and continued on to take outside courses for certification.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

This is an interesting and challenging career for someone looking to expand their horizons. Optometry and ophthalmology are ever changing fields so the job never gets stale. If you think this may be the job for you, contact our office manager Linda at Lknapp@LakeShoreVision.com with your resume and a brief letter describing why you think you would make a good eye technician.  And if there are any experienced ophthalmic or optometric techs out there, we'd love to hear from you also!

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


‘RUNNY’ EYES By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 25, 2017

Our eyes need tears to remain healthy but if they are tearing too much it can be annoying.  Excessive tearing can happen for many reasons, including:  allergies, a scratched eye, infection, getting something in the eye, blocked tear ducts, eyelid problems or dry eye.

Believe it or not, dry eyes are one of the main reasons that our eyes get watery.  This happens because of something called reflex tearing.  If the eyes are too dry, sometimes the tear glands kick into overdrive to moisturize the eyes.  This is very common when it is cold and windy.   Some people have chronic dry eyes so they need artificial tear eye drops or prescription eye drops to help alleviate the excessive tearing.

We have glands that are constantly producing tears.  These tears drain through little holes (puncta) in our upper and lower eyelids and then into the back of your nose and throat.  Sometimes the drainage system can get clogged, causing an overflow of tears or very watery eyes.   Ectropion is a condition where the eyelids are pulled out, away from the eyeball.  This makes it difficult for the tears to reach the puncta and again resulting in an overflow of tears.  Either of these conditions may require surgical treatment.

Allergies, colds, foreign objects and eye infections can also cause watery eyes.  The eyes reflexively tear to protect the eye by rinsing out bacteria, foreign objects, viruses and things we are allergic to.  Treating the underlying condition in critical to improving the tearing.

Watery eyes are very common and can occur for many reasons.  While tearing is important for the health of your eyes, excessive tearing or “runny” eyes can be annoying. Should this be a problem for you, schedule an appointment so we identify the source and select the appropriate treatment.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices optometry at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Mark German. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


TOP 10 CONTACT LENS DO’S AND DON’TS By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 6, 2017
  1. Do not wear them when your eyes are red or irritated.  Wearing contacts with irritated eyes will most likely make things worse.
  2. Try not to swim with them in.  Wearing contacts while swimming can make it easier to get an eye infection or have irritation from chlorine.
  3. Take them out every night unless you are told that it is ok to sleep with them in by your eye doctor.  Leaving contacts in overnight increases likelihood for infection.
  4. Replace your disinfecting solution in the case daily.
  5. Rinse your contact lens case with hot water, let it air dry daily, and thoroughly clean your contact lens case weekly.
  6. Replace your contact lens case quarterly.  Serious eye infections can result from old dirty contact lens cases.
  7. Replace soft disposable contact lenses on a schedule prescribed by your eye doctor.  Wearing older dirty contacts increases risk of infection or inflammation.
  8. Get an eye exam yearly.  The eye health has to be assessed to make sure the contact lens is not causing any problems.
  9. Never store them in tap water.
  10. 10.  Always handle the contacts with clean hands.

Most of the time contact lenses provide excellent vision, and if they are worn like your eye doctor prescribed should provide a healthy alternative to glasses.

 

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an Optometrist practicing with Drs. Martha Jay and Mark German at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


ASTIGMATISM EXPLAINED By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 28, 2017

Astigmatism refers to the curvature of the surface of your eye.  If your eye is round like a baseball, you do not have astigmatism and can quit reading now!  But if the front of your eye has a curvature, making it shaped more like a football than a baseball, then you have astigmatism.

Generally patients don’t realize they have astigmatism.  We may mention it when we determine your glasses prescription but often we just write the prescription to compensate for it.

Serious discussions of astigmatism generally start when a patient is considering cataract surgery, LASIK vision correction or contact lenses.  There are special Toric contacts available for those with astigmatism and often they work quite well.  Many, however, find that toric contacts don’t provide consistent vision as they tend to rotate on the eye with blinking.

There is a common misconception that you cannot have LASIK if you have astigmatism but this is absolutely not true.  In fact this is actually a frequent reason for patients to elect to have LASIK as they are unhappy with their vision in glasses or contact lenses.

If you have astigmatism and cataracts, we can insert Toric implants at the time of surgery to improve your vision. More recently, Bifocal Toric implants have become available, now making bifocal implants an option for those with astigmatism.

Still confused?  Call for a complete eye examination and we will determine if you have significant astigmatism and how best to compensate for it.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


WHAT CAN YOUR PUPILS TELL US? By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 21, 2017

The pupil is a hole in the iris that allows light to transmit to the retina inside of the eye.  Bright light causes the pupils to constrict (get smaller), and darkness causes the pupils to dilate (get larger).  The pupils are constantly changing size to control the amount of light that enters the eye.  This is all controlled by our autonomic nervous system automatically without us having to think about it.  Pupil testing is an important part of the eye examination, and abnormal pupils can indicate eye health or overall health problems.

Some chemicals or drugs can alter pupil size, and make them less reactive to changing light conditions.  Systemic drugs like morphine, codeine, or heroin can make pupils smaller.  Also, exposure to some pet flea/tick products can make pupils smaller.  Medications like scopolamine patches used to treat motion sickness can make pupils larger.  Over the counter allergy eye drops, “get the red out” eye drops, and anti-itch creams may make the pupils larger.

Anisocoria is the condition where one pupil is a different size than the other.  Some people are born with different sized pupils.  Ocular surgical complications or eye injuries can cause a pupil to change size or shape.  If one pupil suddenly becomes larger or smaller than the other, it is important to have an eye examination to determine the cause.  Sometimes a very serious problem like concussion, cerebral aneurysm, cerebral mass, or stroke can alter the size of the pupils.

During routine eye examinations, we carefully evaluate the pupils for abnormalities.  We also dilate the pupils to more carefully evaluate the health of the inside of the eye.  Any sudden changes in pupil size should be evaluated to determine the cause.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Drs. Martha Jay and Mark German. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


“DO I HAVE TO HAVE THOSE DILATING DROPS TODAY?” By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 14, 2017

When we prepare to put dilating drops in during a complete eye examination, we often hear “Not today, I have too much to do!”  The problem is that dilation is a major part of the eye examination.  Without it, you have only had the front part of your eyes examined.  Having an eye examination without dilating drops is like going to the gynecologist or primary care doctor without taking your clothes off!

We use the dilating drops to get a better view of the retina in the back of the eye and the blood vessels that overly it.  The eye is the only place in the body where we can directly see these tiny blood vessels which can be affected by high blood pressure, diabetes and many other medical conditions.  We are also looking for retinal tears or masses that cannot be seen through a small pupil.

Most people can go about their regular day after dilation if they have sunglasses.  The problem comes with reading but if you are already in bifocals, your reading should not be too impaired.  Most people are back to normal within 3-4 hours after the exam.

So just plan ahead.  If you are scheduled for a complete eye examination and find it difficult to function with dilating drops, arrange your schedule accordingly.  As long as you are having your eyes examined, you might as well have us evaluate your whole eye and not just the front part. At lease we don’t make you take your clothes off!

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an Optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Drs. Martha Jay and James Ivanoski. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 

 


iSTENT: NEW SURGICAL OPTION FOR GLAUCOMA By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsino,

By user-admin
August 28, 2017

iStent

If you have glaucoma and cataracts, there is a new surgical option to tackle both at the time of your cataract surgery called the iStent. This tiny device (1 mm by 0.3 mm) helps control your eye pressure by increasing the outflow of fluid from the front of the eye. The eye is like a small plumbing system: there is fluid constantly entering the eye from behind the pupil and leaving it through a sponge-like meshwork at the edges of the eye in front of the colored iris. By placing the iStent, we bypass this meshwork, allowing the fluid to leave more quickly and with the goal of decreasing eye pressure.

The iStent is part of a new type of glaucoma care called Micro-Invasive Glaucoma Surgery or MIGS.   In the past glaucoma was mainly managed with eye drops, lasers or extensive surgery. This new option is less traumatic to the eye than traditional glaucoma surgery but does need to be done at the time of cataract surgery. Once the cataract procedure is completed and the lens implant in place, we then turn the patient’s head to one side and insert the iStent. You cannot see or feel the stent.

How do you know if the iStent is an option for you?  We will discuss this in more detail at your next eye examination but generally your glaucoma must be mild or moderate. If you have severe glaucoma, for example taking multiple medications for this or have significant vision loss, then other surgical options will be discussed.  If you have already had cataract surgery or your cataracts are not ready yet for surgery, you also would not be a candidate for the iStent at this time.

Regardless of the treatment for glaucoma, close follow-up is important to be sure this condition is well controlled. That generally means seeing you at least every 6 months: one visit with dilating drops and the other with the side vision test along with the scan of the back of the eye. We look forward to sharing this new innovation in glaucoma care with you in the near future.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as glaucoma care, cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


LASIK OR CONTACTS: WHICH IS SAFER? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 25, 2017

If you don’t like glasses, your alternatives include contact lenses or LASIK vision correction. We know that LASIK is more convenient and saves you money in the long run but which is the safer alternative? You’ll be surprised to learn that that actually LASIK is safer than wearing contact lenses. As a comprehensive ophthalmologist, I treat all types of eye problems. It is much more common for a contact lens wearer to come in with a severe eye problem than someone who has had LASIK.

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Up to 6% of contact lens wearers per year experience a severe eye infection, worsening dry eye symptoms or even an allergy to contact lenses themselves. These and other problems are not only painful but can lead to permanent vision loss and an inability to resume contact use or have LASIK in the future.

As LASIK safety is not the same everywhere you go, select your LASIK surgeon carefully.  All my patients benefit from blade-free LASIK using two lasers instead of one.  It is almost impossible to have a complication during this type of LASIK procedure. That’s why we call it “LASIK for Chickens.”

If you have been thinking about LASIK, consider your odds of a problem if you stay in contacts. You knew that LASIK simplifies your life and is more cost effective; now add safety to the list favoring LASIK.  Give us 20 minutes and we can turn those contacts into a distant memory.

While taking the blade out of the LASIK equation allows more patients to be good candidates, there still are exceptions. To see if LASIK is an option for you, call for your personalized screening exam.  It’s complimentary and pressure-free.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist who has been a leader in refractive surgery in the Milwaukee area for more than 20 years. She was the first doctor in the area to use a laser for vision correction and has continuously offered the most advanced eye care available.  She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


27 CONTACT LENSES FOUND IN PATIENT'S EYE: NEW YORK TIMES ARTICLS

By user-admin
July 28, 2017

Click on the image to the left for a link to an New York Times article about a patient in England who kept putting contact lenses in her eye not realizing she had not taken the last one out. She came in when here eyes were irritated and 27 contact lenses were found.


25 years in Practice! By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
July 27, 2017

What happened? It seems like yesterday that I began practicing medical and surgical eye care in Ozaukee County.  I was fresh from my residency in Ophthalmology at Northwestern University in Chicago and St. Mary’s Hospital was soon to relocate to Mequon from Port Washington. The community appeared to be just the right place to make my start.

The tiny 500 square foot office in Mequon was where it all began. We had two examination rooms and one employee besides myself.  I really did not know very many people in the area, besides my husband's colleagues at UWM, but patients started coming in.  It has been gratifying since then to get to know so many wonderful people in Ozaukee County.  I have treated 3 or more generations of many families in the area: the kids for their first eye exam, their parents for LASIK and the grandparents for cataract surgery.  Now even those "kids" are young adults and are having LASIK themselves!

Now our practice has grown to 3 doctors and two offices (both considerably larger than 500 square feet).  The commitment to excellence in patient care that was the cornerstone of my success at the onset is ever-present.  We continue to offer the newest and best medical and surgical eye care available.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

If you haven't gotten to know me or my staff yet, we would love the opportunity to show you what quality eye care is all about.  Our offices are in Mequon: 10320 N. Port Washington Road and in Saukville: 620 E. Green Bay Ave (Conservancy Court).

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) who practices with Drs. Mark German & James Ivanoski at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals.  She specializes in small-incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


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