Recent posts

WHAT’S NEW IN GLAUCOMA TREATMENT? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
November 28, 2016

Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss and is generally managed with eye drops. Now there is good news for those of you who are contemplating cataract surgery and also have glaucoma: The iStent. This tiny device can be placed in the eye at the time of cataract surgery to better control eye pressure. The eye is like a tiny plumbing system.  There is a small amount of fluid constantly entering the eye from behind the pupil and then leaving it at the edges of the eye, in front of the colored iris. This fluid is called “aqueous humour” and it is completely replenished every one to two hours.

Eye drops are the most common treatment for glaucoma. The eye drops either decrease how fast the fluid enters the eye or increase how quickly it leaves. Common eye drops that decrease the inflow are Timolol, Brimonidine and Dorzolamide. The most commonly prescribed eye drop that increases the outflow is Latanoprost.  The iStent is a tiny tube (measuring only 1 mm by 0.3 mm) that is placed in front of the iris at the edge of the eye to allow the aqueous humour to leave faster. It is the smallest implantable device in medicine.

The iStent can only be placed at the time of cataract surgery so you need to have both cataracts and mild to moderate glaucoma. If your glaucoma is very severe, you might need more extensive surgery than the iStent provides. It is made of titanium and is not magnetic so won’t interfere with your ability to have a MRI later in life.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Sounds confusing? We can talk about this more at your next eye examination. The goal of the iStent is to get you off some or all of your glaucoma medications. In the meantime, keep taking your drops as we have prescribed them and continue to have regular follow-up examinations.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeshoreVision.com.


Bonobos Could Sure Use Some Glasses!

By user-admin
November 10, 2016

Click on the photo below to see a video from the New York Times about older Bonobo Apes pulling away as they get older to find those lice on their friends! Why don't they just get some reading glasses??


NOVEMBER IS DIABETIC EYE DISEASE MONTH By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 31, 2016
The Wisconsin Council of the Blind and Visually Impaired recognizes November as “Diabetic Eye Disease Month.” The purpose of this designation is to increase awareness about how diabetes can potentially affect your eyes and how to prevent it.
We like to see diabetics at least yearly for a complete eye examination. That includes dilating drops so we can look into the back of your eyes to evaluate your retinas. We are looking for abnormal blood vessels, bleeding or swelling of this delicate tissue. If these problems are detected early, treatments such as lasers or injections are more effective.
Vision loss from diabetic eye disease is preventable. Tight control of your blood sugar is the key. This means carefully monitoring at home and/or at your doctor’s office. The hemoglobin A1c is a simple blood test that measures of how well controlled your blood sugars have been over the prior 90 days. Primary care physicians generally like to see values on this test in the 6 range. Of equal importance is early detection of diabetic eye disease as that improves your chances of protecting your vision.
We stay in close contact with your primary care physician with annual reports about your eyes so they can be fully aware if diabetes has affected them. The eyes actually serve as a “window” into the rest of your body: Diabetes has the potential of affecting small blood vessels elsewhere such as the heart, kidneys and feet. If your eyes are free if diabetic changes, then that is generally good news for the rest of you.
Are you a diabetic and have gone more than a year since your last eye examination? Time to call to set one up, see you soon!
Dr. Mark E. German Dr. Mark German is an Optometrist practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.
For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

TOP 10 CONTACT LENS DO'S AND DON'TS By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 25, 2016

TOP 10 CONTACT LENS DO’S AND DON’TS

  1. Do not wear them when your eyes are red or irritated.  Wearing contacts with irritated eyes will most likely make things worse.
  2. Try not to swim with them in.  Wearing contacts while swimming can make it easier to get an eye infection or have irritation from chlorine.
  3. Take them out every night unless you are told that it is ok to sleep with them in by your eye doctor.  Leaving contacts in overnight increases likelihood for infection.
  4. Replace your disinfecting solution in the case daily.
  5. Rinse your contact lens case with hot water, let it air dry daily, and thoroughly clean your contact lens case weekly.
  6. Replace your contact lens case quarterly.  Serious eye infections can result from old dirty contact lens cases.
  7. Replace soft disposable contact lenses on a schedule prescribed by your eye doctor.  Wearing older dirty contacts increases risk of infection or inflammation.
  8. Get an eye exam yearly.  The eye health has to be assessed to make sure the contact lens is not causing any problems.
  9. Never store them in tap water.

10.  Always handle the contacts with clean hands.

Most of the time contact lenses provide excellent vision, and if they are worn like your eye doctor prescribed should provide a healthy alternative to glasses.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. Ivanoski practices comprehensive Optometry at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


HALLOWEEN EYE HAZARDS By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 17, 2016

Halloween is such a great time of the year…the beautiful fall colors, the crispness in the air, the endless candy supply and of course the cute children in the Halloween costumes.  However, with all the fun, there could be some potential eye hazards that are important to be aware of.

A popular costume trend of late is the decorative contact lens. Because people can buy them over the counter or on the internet, it is believed that a contact lens fitting or proper care is not necessary. This is WRONG.  Unfortunately, these “one size fits all” novelty contacts are not professionally fitted and could cause pain, infections, scratches or even permanent corneal scarring and vision loss.  It is important to realize that these costume products are being sold illegally and are not FDA-approved. By federal law ALL contact lenses are considered to be a medical device, only to be distributed by licensed eye-care professionals after determining the proper fit and prescription.

Other Halloween activities can also lead to eye injuries.  Unfortunately, what may seem like a harmless traditional game, like apple bobbing, could lead to scratches on the surface of the eye and infections from dirty water.  Lanterns and glow sticks can also cause dangerous but avoidable accidents. Hitting the edge of a lantern may lead to a corneal abrasion or the chemicals within a broken glow stick could damage the eye.

This holiday just take a little bit of extra care while having fun!  Happy Halloween from all of us at Lakeshore Eye Care!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


WHEN CAN YOU USE YOUR “VISION PLAN”? By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 10, 2016

Confused about when to use your “Vision Plan” and when to use your regular medical insurance for your eye examination? You are not alone!  Not everyone has a Vision Plan but if you do, it is intended for routine care that may not be covered by medical insurance. This means coming in every 1-2 years to be sure your glasses prescription is correct and your eyes are generally healthy.  These plans may also include a discount on glasses or contact lenses every 1-2 years. More often than not either you or your employer has paid extra for this benefit.

While the exam under a Vision Plan may appear pretty much the same as one under medical insurance, the reason for the visit is the key. If you have diabetes, cataracts, macular degeneration, glaucoma, floaters, rapid change in vision, eye pain, red eyes or any other vision or eye problem, then this is a medical eye visit and will be billed to your medical insurance.  Our medical doctor, Dr. Martha Jay, does not accept Vision Plans as her patients generally have medical or surgical eye problems.

Sometimes patients are paying extra for a Vision Plan they don’t actually need.  An example of this would be if you have macular degeneration and your Vision Plan costs more than the discount it provides on glasses. As your examination would be billed to your medical insurance, you would be losing money by purchasing the Vision Plan.

Still confused?  Our staff will be happy to help you decide which insurance plan is the most appropriate for your visit.  Remember that if you do have both a Vision Plan and regular medical insurance, be sure to bring BOTH cards to EACH appointment.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


HOW TO STAY OUT OF TROUBLE WITH YOUR CONTACTS By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 3, 2016

Contact lenses are a great alternative to glasses for sports and everyday wear. You can avoid fogged up glasses, expand your peripheral or side vision, wear off-the-rack sunglasses or non-prescription sports goggles, and avoid the annoying “slide down the nose” syndrome.  Contacts, however, do take a bit more care than just throwing on a pair of glasses each morning.

Staying out of trouble with contacts starts with being sure you have an accurate fit and prescription by having a complete eye exam every one to two years. If your eyes hurt, become red or your vision changes suddenly then an emergent appointment is indicated as something more serious may be occurring.

As for daily care, start by making sure that your lens case is very clean. Wash it out daily and let it air dry in a clean place. Change the solutions every day. Be sure you are not just using saline to clean your contacts.  You need a product that disinfects as well as cleans the contacts to prevent eye infections.  In addition, discard the contacts according to the schedule advised by your eye doctor. Finally, NEVER sleep in your contacts as this greatly increases your risk of developing a severe infection called a corneal ulcer.

Dr. Mark E. GermanIf your goal is to wake up with clear vision in the morning and avoid taking the time to properly care for your contacts, then you might want to consider seeing my colleague Dr. Martha Jay about LASIK vision correction. As for avoiding problems such as infections and injuries, you may be surprised to learn that we see far more problems in contact lens patients than in those who have had LASIK.

Dr. Mark German specializes in hard-to-fit contact lens patients and comprehensive eye care for all ages. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


OVER THE COUNTER MEDICATIONS AND THE EYES By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 27, 2016

Why do we ask for a list of medications including over the counter drugs and supplements during an eye examination?  You may think that is something that just your primary care physician and pharmacist should be concerned with.  There are two answers to this question.  First, we are part of your medical team.  We use our expertise to evaluate your eyes and relay information back to your primary care physician if we think there is a problem with any medications that are being taken.  Second, a lot of medications affect the eyes so we need to be alerted to look for those side effects.

Even medications like aspirin can have potential ocular side effects.  Aspirin is often used for pain relief, as an anti inflammatory, and is often recommended by physicians as a preventative for heart disease.  Aspirin is an antiplatelet drug.  This means that it makes it easier to bleed.  People that take even a small dose of aspirin daily are more susceptible to something called subconjunctival hemorrhages.  These are small blood vessels on the white part of the eye that bleed slightly causing a very red eye.  Also, since aspirin makes it easier to bleed, an ophthalmologist may ask that aspirin be discontinued prior to any eye surgeries.

Antihistamines are commonly used medications to treat allergies.  These medications can make the eyes drier.  This can cause fluctuating or blurred vision, redness, burning, and tearing.  They can also make contact lens wear more difficult due to dryness.  People with glaucoma should consult with their eye doctor before taking some antihistamines.

Please be patient with us when we review your medications during an eye exam.  We are looking out for the health of your whole body when we examine your eyes.  We look forward to seeing you soon for an eye exam!

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Mark German at Lakeshore Eye Care with two offices in Ozaukee County (Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin). He specializes in general eye care with comprehensive eye examinations for patients of all ages and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


FLEX PLANS AND LASIK By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 19, 2016

Did you just spend another summer annoyed with your contacts and glasses?  Have you been considering LASIK but are not sure how to fit it into your budget?  If that sounds like you, don’t overlook the savings offered by Flexible Spending or Health Savings Accounts.  While not part of all benefit packages, many employers do provide this option to utilize pre-tax income for medical procedures such as LASIK.  The rules vary but most plans require a Fall commitment for the following year.  Check with your Human Resources Officer to determine your specific deadline.

Even if one of these plans is not an option for you, LASIK actually saves you money compared to staying in contacts and glasses. You may not realize it but those expenses add up: If you are now 30 years-old and wear 2 week disposable contacts, you can expect to spend $21,900 over the rest of your life on contacts, glasses and solutions!

Most, but not all people are good candidates for blade-free LASIK. That’s why a LASIK screening exam is critical before committing Flex funds for coming year. This complimentary evaluation involves critical measurements of your vision and your eyes to determine if LASIK is right for you.  You’ll learn a lot about LASIK and have a chance to get acquainted with our great team at Lakeshore Eye Care.

Improve your outlook on life in 2017 by calling today to arrange your no-pressure LASIK screening exam.  See you soon.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a pioneer in laser refractive surgery in the Milwaukee area, being the first doctor in the area to utilize a laser for this purpose.  She now exclusively uses the WaveLight blade-free LASIK system: the fastest laser available anywhere for LASIK vision correction.  In just seconds, you can improve your vision and say goodbye to those annoying contacts!

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


HOW DOES ALCOHOL AFFECT THE EYES? By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 19, 2016

Most adults like to have a glass of wine, a beer, or a cocktail once in a while.  So how does that drink affect the eyes?

Alcohol is a depressant.  If consumed in excess, it causes our focusing and eye muscle movements to slow down and become less reliable.  This results in focusing difficulty and even double vision which can make depth perception difficult.   It can slow down our pupil reaction speed to changes in light.  This causes a decrease in contrast sensitivity making it harder to see things at dusk or twilight.  It can also make it more difficult for the eyes to readjust from oncoming glare of headlights while driving at night.

A few drinks can make the eyes drier.  Dry eye sufferers may notice that their eyes are significantly drier after drinking.  Alcohol is a vasodilator (blood vessels get swollen).  This causes red eyes.

The way that our body metabolizes alcohol can elevate blood sugar levels.  This can be a problem for diabetics.  It can cause vision fluctuation and increase the risk for diabetic retinopathy (hemorrhages and swelling of the retina).

Alcohol is also toxic.  If consumed in massive quantities at once or over many years, it can have serious detrimental effects to the eye health and vision.  Alcoholics are at risk to develop something called toxic amblyopia.  This is caused by malnutrition and vitamin A and B deficiencies that result from alcoholism.  The optic nerve that brings information from the eye to the brain can be damaged resulting in permanent vision loss.

Most physicians agree that drinking alcoholic beverages occasionally and in small amounts is probably not harmful, but try not to overdo it.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is the latest additional to the staff at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, joining us in May. He has more than 20 years experience as an eye care provider and has fit in quite well. He specialized in general eye care and contact lens fitting.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


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