Recent posts

LOOKING FOR A LIFT? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
March 23, 2015

Dr. Neda Esmaili

Are you beginning to look a little like your parents with drooping eyelids? Do people ask you if you are tired or had a rough night when you are well rested? It might be time to consider doing something to bring your appearance back to where you would like it to be. We have just the answer for you in our newest doctor, Neda Esmaili. She is a fellowship trained oculoplastics surgeon. That means that she is an ophthalmologist, just like myself and Dr. Cueto, who has then completed a 2 year fellowship in eye plastic surgery.

Dr. Esmaili is seeing patients in our Mequon office one day per week. The rest of the time she can be found at the Eye Institute where she recently joined the faculty. She offers a full range of possibilities for looking your best including non-surgical options such as botox and fillers.  She also takes care of more serious problems such as tumors around the eyes or eyelids, thyroid related issues such as double vision or prominent eyes, eyelids that turn in or turn out, blocked tear ducts and more.

We are very pleased to welcome Dr. Esmaili to our practice. She and Dr. Deborah Costakos, our pediatric ophthalmologist, are providing a much needed presence on this side of town for those seeking specialized medical and surgical eye care. They round out our eye care offerings with myself, Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto and Dr. Mark German together providing small incision cataract surgery, blade-free LASIK, glaucoma treatment, macular degeneration management, dry eye options, contact lens fitting, general eye care and more.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


WHAT’S UP WITH TODDLER TUESDAY? By Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
March 12, 2015

If you have visited our Mequon office on a Tuesday, you may have wondered about all the strollers and activity around the play table. We call it “Toddler Tuesday” as Dr. Deborah Costakos is here then. She is a fellowship trained pediatric ophthalmologist specializing in eye problems specific to children. The rest of the week, Dr. Costakos can be found in the many neonatal intensive care units (NICU’s) in the area and at Children’s Hospital.

Dr. Deborah Costakos

Children can have a number of serious eye conditions that, if not treated promptly, could result in lifelong vision problems.  The youngest patients she sees are only a few days old.  Those are the ones born early (before 32 weeks gestation) or who have a low birth weight (under 1500 grams or 3.3 pounds).  These tiny babies can develop a condition called “retinopathy of prematurity” or ROP. If Dr. Costakos sees abnormal blood vessels inside their eyes, she may need to intervene with lasers or other therapies to allow normal vision development.

Dr. Costakos also takes care of older children with wandering eyes. Sometimes these children are treated with a patch over one eye, glasses or even surgery to bring the eyes into alignment. Wandering eyes can happen with adults too, so sometimes they join the fun on Toddler Tuesday!  Patients with genetic eye problems, infantile cataracts, congenital eye tumors and more are also among her patients.

For more information about Dr. Costakos and pediatric eye care, call our office or visit our web site below.  Next week, look for an article about our newest addition, Dr. Neda Esmaili, who specializes in plastic surgery around the eyes!

For more  information on such topics as iLASIK, cataract surgery or pediatric eye care,  call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


THE DRESS!! By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
March 9, 2015

Unless you have been living in total isolation without access to newspapers, internet, magazines or television you probably have heard about “the dress”. This is a photo of a dress that has been widely circulated but appears different to different people. The whole thing started with a photo posting of a mother-of-the bride’s dress by a young women living on the Scottish Hebredian island of Colonsay. From there it took off to become an internet sensation. Some say the dress appears to be blue with a black fringe, others totally disagree and insist it is a white dress with a gold fringe.

Why such a fuss over a dress? How could someone from a tiny island across the Atlantic trigger this media frenzy? It is because how we perceive “the dress” explains a lot about how color perception works and how the viewer and their surroundings influence perception.

For context, if there is a white background around the photo, the dress appears to be blue. If there is a black background around the photo, the dress is perceived as white.  There are also differences in color perception between the sexes. Men have 25% more neurons in the vision part of the brain which affects their color perception. The result is a slight shift in how they perceive colors compared to women. Green grass appears slightly yellow to men and very green to women. A color that appears orange to a woman, appears more red to a man.

“The dress” is a bit of fun and a nice distraction from some of the other news of the day!

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. German is an optometrist offering comprehensive eye care for patients of all ages. He accepts most insurance plans. Along with his colleagues, Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals offers medical and surgical eye care including blade-free LASIK, small incision cataract surgery, glaucoma care, macular degeneration management, dry eye options, contact lens fitting and general eye examinations.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


DOES YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE AFFECT YOUR EYE PRESSURE? By Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
March 3, 2015

As far as your health is concerned, the two times you hear about “pressure” is with blood pressure and eye pressure. An abnormally high blood pressure could lead to heart disease or stokes. An abnormally high eye pressure could lead to vision loss from glaucoma.  A logical question is whether or not the two are directly related.

It turns out that the two are related. A 2005 article in the British Journal of Ophthalmology reported on the Beaver Dam study. This is a Wisconsin based long term study following thousands of people in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. The study looked at diastolic (the low number) blood pressure and systolic (the higher number) blood pressure and compared it to the patient’s eye pressure. The results found that for every 10 mm Hg increase in diastolic blood pressure, there was a corresponding 0.6 mm Hg increase in eye pressure. The effects of systolic blood pressure on eye pressure were less. For every 10 mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure, there was a 0.3 mm Hg increase in eye pressure.

Is this important? First and foremost you concern should be maintaining a healthy blood pressure. This is something for you and your primary care provider to determine. As for eye pressure, you would have to have a very significant elevation in blood pressure to cause significant vision damage from glaucoma but it could certainly happen.

This is just another reason to keep on top of your general health care as it can affect your eye pressure too. Other potential eye problems from uncontrolled blood pressure include small strokes behind the eye and broken or blocked blood vessels in the eye. Take care of yourself and make your eyes happy too!

Dr. Josephine-Liezl P. Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto is a board certified ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery, glaucoma care, macular degeneration management, dry eye options and more. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


PUNXSUTAWNEY PHIL SAY IT ISN’T SO! By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
February 18, 2015

The famous groundhog “Punxsutawney Phil” and our own Milwaukee Zoo counterpart “Wynter” both agree: six more weeks of winter. Instead of just bundling up and enduring while you wait for warmer weather, why not spend your winter wisely by having LASIK vision correction to enhance your summer fun?

To set your mind at ease about LASIK, start by selecting an experienced local doctor you can trust. Did you know that I was the very first doctor in the Milwaukee area to perform laser refractive surgery? Then be sure you doctor is using the most advanced precision laser technology available.  We do just that by exclusively offering blade-free LASIK with the IntraLase and VISX lasers. Affordability should not be your top concern but contacts are expensive.  If you are a 30 year-old contact lens wearer, expect to pay $20,000 over your lifetime for contacts and solutions.  With those savings and our financing plan, LASIK is a deal.

Blade-free LASIK in my hands is safe, reliable and pain free. You are in the laser suite for only about 20 minutes with each laser running for a minute or less.  I suggest that you take two days off your regular activities.  After LASIK other restrictions include no contact sports, eye makeup or swimming for 2 weeks and no vigorous eye rubbing for 6 weeks. You can drive the next day as your vision will be remarkably improved but complete healing takes about 3 months.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Don’t let a couple of groundhogs ruin your day, get prepared for summer by calling 262-241-1919 today to arrange your complimentary LASIK screening exam.  You’ll enjoy swimming, biking, boating and all your other summer passions so much more without the hassles of contacts or glasses.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


THE WHAT AND WHY OF A “CCD” By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
February 14, 2015

If you have been to our office recently, you were probably given information about expecting an email requesting that you to sign onto our secure network. The purpose of this is to view a summary of your examination called a Continuity of Care Document (CCD). Why are we asking you to do this? The reason is to help in the development of our electronic records system.

Almost every health care provider has been making the transition from paper records to using a computer. Electronic medical records provide a more efficient form of care in that they are easier to read, easier to compare changes over time and easier to share with other providers. Medicare recognizes these advantages and has provided a financial incentive to offset the considerable expense of the conversion for doctors and clinics.  They don’t just hand out the money, however. They require that we comply with something called “Meaningful Use.”

One of these Meaningful Use requirements is that we establish a way for patients to have access a brief summary of their visit. That is the purpose of the CCD. All the computer companies, including ours, have been struggling to make this system work efficiently. By signing onto our system you are helping us test and perfect this first stage of the CCD. We realize that it takes a few minutes of your time but really appreciate your assistance in this important investment in the future of electronic medicine.

Dr. Mark E. GermanNow that you know the “What and the Why of a CCD”, don’t forget to respond to our email asking you to click on the MySecureData link to test our system. Remember that in order for your efforts to count, at the end where you must click on “Send a Message” so we know that you have successfully entered the portal. THANK YOU!!

Dr. Mark German is an optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


ALL EYE VITAMINS ARE NOT EQUAL By Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
February 7, 2015

AREDS2newFor most of our patients with macular degeneration (AMD), we typically recommend a specific formula of nutritional supplements called AREDS2 vitamins.  This suggestion is based on two important ophthalmologic studies called the Age-Related Eye Disease trials. These studies found that high dosages of antioxidants and zinc slowed down the progression of intermediate AMD.  There are many eye vitamins to choose from but unfortunately not all eye vitamins are created equally!

Recent studies have found that some popular “eye vitamins” do not have the ingredients and dosages that have been proven effective in the trials previously mentioned, in spite of their labels that claim to promote eye health.  Those who are already taking vitamins for their AMD should verify that their eye vitamins have the following ingredients and dosages:  Vitamin C 500 mg, Vitamin E 400 mg, Zinc 80 mg, Copper 2 mg, Lutein 10 mg and Zeaxanthin 2 mg.

In the past, we recommended AREDS supplements instead of the AREDS2.  The reason for the change is that the AREDS2 supplements have been shown to be just as effective as the regular AREDS but with fewer side effects.

Dr. Josephine-Liezl P. Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto

If you have not been diagnosed with AMD, there is no evidence that the use of these nutritional supplements will prevent the condition.   If you have a family history of AMD, we suggest that you be sure to wear sunglasses outside, to eat plenty of leafy green vegetables and NOT so smoke.  We understand that it can be difficult to decide if you should be taking eye vitamins.  Feel free to call or come in should you have any questions about this important topic or any others.

Dr. Cueto is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


IS LATTISE FOR YOU? BY DR. JOSEPHINE-LIEZL CUETO, OPHTHALMOLOGIST AT LAKESHORE EYE CARE PROFESSIONALS WITH OFFICES IN MEQUON & SAUKVILLE, WISCONSIN

By editor
February 2, 2015

For those who are not blessed with long and full eyelashes, current beauty trends can be very tempting.  Every few weeks I have a patient ask, “I’ve heard about Latisse on television, could I try that?”  While this product may give you your desired beautiful eyelashes, there are some considerations and side effects that are important to be aware of before getting started.

Latisse (bimatoprost ophthalmic solution) has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to help lengthen, thicken and darken eyelashes. Surprisingly Latisse was developed from a commonly used glaucoma medication called Lumigan. Those patients who were using Lumigan to treat their glaucoma found that their eyelashes often became thicker and longer! As a result, Latisse was created for cosmetic purposes.

Although this medication is very effective, it does come with possible side effects which include redness of the eye, darkening of the skin of the eyelids (which reverses after discontinuation) and darkening of the iris (the colored portion of the eye) which is usually permanent.  Latisse should not be used by anyone under the age of 18 years old, pregnant women or women who are breastfeeding.

If you have any desire to start Latisse, it is important to consult your eye doctor first to see if it is a good fit for you.  This is especially true if you have a history of ocular infections, glaucoma, macular edema or eye inflammation.  Remember, we are always here to answer any questions you may have about the health and care of your eyes!

Dr. Josephine-Liezl P. Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including cataract surgery, dry eye treatments, macular degeneration, glaucoma and more.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


GLAUCOMA AWARENESS MONTH by Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
January 11, 2015

Eye ChartJanuary is National Glaucoma Awareness Month. The purpose of these various medical awareness months is to increase the public’s understanding of serious medical conditions. While many have heard of glaucoma, most really don’t know what it is, how it is diagnosed and what treatment options are available.

Glaucoma is an eye condition caused by damage to the optic nerve in the back of the eye.  It is often but not always associated with increased eye pressure.  The optic nerve is like a cable, carrying visual information from the eye to the brain.  If it is damaged, permanent vision loss may occur.  Unfortunately, glaucoma has no symptoms until up to 40% of the side or peripheral vision has been lost.

Over 2.2 million Americans have glaucoma but unfortunately up to 50% of them are unaware of it. Glaucoma is a leading cause of preventable blindness which is why early diagnosis is so important. It is most commonly treated with eye drops but more severe cases may require lasers or surgery. Glaucoma risks include: increased age, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, or a family member with the disease.

How is it diagnosed?  As there are no symptoms, the key to diagnosis is to have regular eye examinations with dilating drops at least every one to two years.  The reason dilation is so important is that it allows us to look at the optic nerve in the back of the eye. If the eye pressure is elevated or optic nerves are abnormal, extra testing is done to evaluate side vision and the health of the optic nerves.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDon't become a statistic! Call for your complete eye examination today.

Dr. Mark German practices comprehensive optometry at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Drs. Martha Jay and Josephine-Liezl Cueto. For more eye care information call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


WHEN IS A VISUAL HALLUCINATION NOT A CAUSE FOR ALARM? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
January 5, 2015

I once had a patient state very calmly that there was an army in her backyard filming a movie. Her family was quite concerned and worried that she was developing dementia or a serious mental illness. Fortunately neither was the case.  These “hallucinations” were caused by a condition called the Charles Bonnet Syndrome.

This syndrome occurs in those with limited vision.  In my experience, it is generally seen in patients with severe macular degeneration. Macular degeneration is the leading cause of legal blindness for people over 65, but only 10-40% of those with severe vision loss experience the syndrome. Charles Bonnet was a Swiss philosopher who first described these visual hallucinations in 1760 after observing his grandfather who was going blind from cataracts.

The mechanism is thought to be due to the brain filling in for the reduced visual input from the eye. The episodes can last from seconds to minutes, occur rarely or be more frequent. Usually about 18 months after the onset they just gradually disappear. The most common type of hallucination involves faces of people but animals or plants may also be seen. The images appear smaller than in real life.  Another hallmark is that vision is the only sense involved so there are no associated abnormal sounds or smells.

What to do if you yourself or a family member are experiencing this syndrome? First be sure to have a thorough eye examination to see if there are any treatment options for the vision loss. If none are available, then reassurance from family and friends about what is real and what is not is helpful for the patient involved.  As with the patient who “saw” the army in her backyard, the images rarely concern the patient but are worrisome to their family members.  Hopefully the above explanation will set all involved at ease.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including blade-free iLASIK and small incision cataract surgery with premium lens implants.

For more eye care informati0n, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


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