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I’M A GLAUCOMA “SUSPECT” – WHAT’S THAT? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 12, 2016

Have you been told that you are a glaucoma suspect? Have you wondered “What is it, do I or do I not have glaucoma?”  Unfortunately the diagnosis of glaucoma is not cut and dry. There is a grey area which occurs when some aspects of your examination are suggestive of glaucoma but you do not actually have the condition.  Those in that situation are considered glaucoma suspects.

What we are monitoring are your eye pressure, the appearance of the optic nerve in the back of the eye and your side vision. The optic nerve looks like a saucer with an inside part and an outside part. The inside part in a “normal” patient is generally 30% or less than the outside part and stable over time. Your eye pressure should generally be less than 21 mm Hg.  If either an optic nerve problem is noted or an elevated eye pressure detected, further testing may be indicated.

By further testing, we generally mean the visual field computer test. You look   into a large dish and push a button when you see a small light. This measures just how bright lights have to be for you to see them in all parts of your side vision. This test is important as glaucoma vision loss starts in the periphery and it does not become apparent to patients until they have lost up to 40%.

If we do decide that you have converted from a glaucoma suspect to an actual glaucoma patient, the condition is easily treated generally with eye drops.  Does that make more sense to you “suspects” out there?  We know that the visual field tests are not particularly popular but, as noted above, they are critical for glaucoma monitoring.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) who specializes in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


DR. JAY – TOP DOCTORS LIST MILWAUKEE MAGAZINE AGAIN! By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 8, 2016

You knew that Dr. Martha Jay was a great doctor, now the annual Milwaukee Magazine “Top Doctors” list agrees for a second year in a row. Check out the August issue for primary care doctors and specialists in the Milwaukee area who were selected for this honor.  Our patients often comment that it seems like everyone they know has had eye surgery with Dr. Jay and is thrilled with the results.  If you are ready for cataract surgery or are interested in having LASIK vision correction, call her for an evaluation to see what she can do to improve your outlook on life.

Cataract surgery may seem easy as it only takes 10-15 minutes and is pain free but there is considerable skill involved. Dr. Jay likes to say that surgery is like sailing (another of her passions) in that you learn something every time you go out. You want all that experience when you are considering a surgeon for your cataract surgery.

Dr. Jay also has considerable experience in LASIK vision correction, being the first doctor in the Milwaukee area to use a laser for refractive surgery. She exclusively offers blade-free LASIK using two lasers instead of one. This makes LASIK much safer and considerably more comfortable. There is still time this summer to have LASIK done, all you need to do is call for a free consultation to see if the procedure is right for you.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

All the doctors at Lakeshore Eye Care are proud of Dr. Jay. Our team includes myself, Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski. Between the three of us we cover all age groups and all aspects eye care from general examinations to contact lenses to eye surgery. Visit our web site or call for more details.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


BLEPHARITIS By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
July 19, 2016

Why are my eyelids always red?  How come I have “crusties” on my eye lashes?  Why is there “gunk” building up in the corner of my eye?  Why do I get styes?  Why do my eyelids stick together in the morning?  If you are asking yourself those questions, you may have blepharitis.  Blepharitis is common inflammatory eyelid condition.  Some of the symptoms include redness or swelling of the eyelids, flakes on the lashes, misdirected or loss of lashes, burning, itching, a foreign body sensation, irritation and/or tearing.  Blepharitis can affect the outside part of the eyelid where the eyelashes attach (anterior blepharitis) or it can affect the inner edge of the eye lid that touches the eye (posterior blepharitis).

So what causes blepharitis?  The most common causes are bacteria (staphylococcal blepharitis) and skin conditions like dandruff and acne rosacea (seborrheic blepharitis).  Rarely, allergies, a mite infestation, or viruses can cause blepharitis.

Blepharitis is diagnosed by ophthalmologists or optometrists through a careful history of symptoms, evaluation of the eyelids and eye and a careful evaluation of the tears.  Untreated blepharitis can cause dry eyes to worsen, permanent loss of lashes, notches in the eyelid, styes and, in worst case scenarios, even scarring of the cornea.

Treatment depends on the type of blepharitis.  Eyelid hygiene typically helps for most types of blepharitis.  This includes warm compresses over the eyelids daily, gentle cleansing of the eyelashes with a non-irritating soap (baby shampoo) and the use of artificial tears.  Some types of blepharitis require prescription eye drops, ointments or oral antibiotics.  We can help you with the appropriate treatment for your situation at your next appointment.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices comprehensive optometry at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com

 


COMPUTER VISION SYNDROME By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
July 12, 2016

Computers seem to be taking over our lives and along with that has come an increase in computer related vision complaints. The problem even has a name: “Computer Vision Syndrome.”  The symptoms include burning, itching, dryness or redness of the eyes along with blurred vision.  Usually the complaints begin after about 3 or more hours of computer use.  Other non-vision related problems include tension headaches and lower back pain.

70-90% of those who use computers on a regular basis for work or play experience this syndrome.  Most of the vision symptoms are due to dry eyes.  The association between dry eyes and computer usage is thought to be due to decreased blink rate. Normally we blink about 17 times per minute but with computers use we tend to “stare” and drop the blink rate down to 12-15 times per minute.

What’s the solution? The 20-20-20 rule for start: Every 20 minutes take 20 seconds to refocus 20 feet away. Set the monitor so your eyes are lined up near the top of the screen, requiring you to look down slightly to see the center.  This decreases how exposed or open your eyes are and relaxes your neck. Your screen should also be brighter than the room lighting, so dim the room lights and avoid bright sunlight. Finally, if consciously increasing your blink rate does not help then use tear supplements to improve your comfort and vision.

Other options can be discussed at your next comprehensive eye examination or sooner should there be a more urgent need.  Adapted from “Computer Vision Syndrome Affects Millions” by Jane Brody, New York Times 5/30/16.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


With Cataracts, My Own Private Light Show by Richard Liebmann-Smith, New York Times Contributer

By user-admin
July 6, 2016

Click on the photo to the left for a New York Times article by Richard Liebmann-Smith describing his experience before and after cataract surgery. Before the surgery the lights of the city looked like an arcade, bright and glaring, but afterwards the world was a more beautiful and realistic place!


ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT AND YOUR EYES By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
July 5, 2016

Our sun provides life giving light to our planet.  However, some of the radiation that the sun emits can potentially harm us.  Ultraviolet (UV) light is not visible to us, but can damage our skin and our eyes.  There are 3 types of UV radiation. UV-C is absorbed by the ozone layer of the earth, and does not pose any threat.  However, UV-A and UV-B can cause short and long term damage to our skin and eyes.  UV radiation can also be emitted by artificial sources such as tanning beds, lasers, and welding machines.

Exposure to excessive amounts of UV radiation without protection in a short time can cause a “sunburn” to the eye.  Welders know this as welders flash or burn of the eyes.  It causes a painful, red, tearing, and light sensitive eye lasting for several days.  Looking directly into the sun or artificial source of UV light without protection can cause permanent and irreversible damage to the retina inside the eye.  This can cause a permanent blind spot in your vision.  That is why we are taught from a young age to not stare into the sun.

Exposure to UV light prematurely ages the eyes.  UV exposure accelerates cataract growth, causes growths on the eye called pterygiums and pingueculas, is associated with macular degeneration, and cancer in or around the eye.

So, how can we protect our eyes from UV light?  Sunglasses!  It is important for all ages to be in the habit of wearing sunglasses even on cloudy days since clouds do not block UV radiation.  Even inexpensive sunglasses can block 100% of UV-A and UV-B from reaching the eyes.  Some contact lenses also block UV radiation.   We never think twice about wearing sunscreen to protect our skin so wear those sunglasses to protect your eyes.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He provides comprehensive eye care for patients of all ages and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


TIPS FOR HEALTHY EYES By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 27, 2016

There is a tendency to not really think about your eyes unless you have a problem such as pain or blurred vision. Most people, frankly, take better care of their car than their eyes! They take the car in for regular servicing for preventative maintenance and repair problems as they occur. Your eyes don’t ask much, just be treated kindly, and in return they provide you with a window into the world.

The most important gifts you can give your eyes are: wearing sunglasses outside, not smoking and having a healthy diet.  The sunglasses block the UVA and UVB radiation that can damage the retina and promote cataracts. Macular degeneration is a leading cause of vision loss for those over 65 years-old and there is a clear link between ultraviolet exposure and this condition. There are two types of macular degeneration, the dry and the wet. Smoking increases your chances of developing the more severe, wet type. A diet with plenty of leafy green vegetables is also helpful in preventing macular degeneration. These are lifetime habits that protect you most precious sense, your vision.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Just as your car needs servicing, your eyes need a thorough evaluation every one to two years. The purpose is not just to be sure you have the best possible glasses and contact lens prescription, it is also to be sure your eyes are healthy. Glaucoma is a leading cause of preventable vision loss and has no symptoms until it is quite severe. If detected early during an eye examination, preserving your vision is a simple as taking an eye drop daily.

SEE you soon!

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


SWIMMING AND CONTACT LENSES, OH NO! By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 24, 2016

You can’t see without your glasses so why not swim in your contact lenses?  The “why not” has to do with safety: swimming in contact lenses significantly increases your risk of developing eye problems that range from mild to quite severe. Most contact lenses are at least 50% water.  This means that chlorinated water penetrates your contacts and stays in on the surface of your eye for up to an hour after swimming.  The result is an irritation to the surface of your eye and an increased risk of infection.

While a mild eye irritation may go away in a day or so, a severe eye infection can result in permanent vision loss.  Even in the best maintained pool or spa, bacteria can be present.  In lake water, a severe pathogen called acanthamoeba may be present that causes a difficult to treat corneal ulcer.  This protozoa penetrates the cornea rapidly and often requires specially formulated eye drops to save the eye.  Beaches may also present the possibility of a fusarium fungal infection.

Those glasses may be bulky but they are your better choice over contacts in the water.  If you really want to see well in the water without glasses, however, it may be time to consider LASIK vision correction.  With LASIK you can free yourself of the hassles of glasses and still safely enjoy the outdoors.  LASIK is actually safer than contact lenses on dry land too!  As you know, our Dr. Martha Jay is a leader in blade-free LASIK vision correction.

LASIK screening exams are free, just give us a call. In the meantime, don’t wear those contacts in the water!

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


“DO I HAVE TO HAVE THOSE DILATING DROPS TODAY?” By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 10, 2016

When we prepare to put dilating drops in during a complete eye examination, we often hear “Not today, I have too much to do!”  The problem is that dilation is a major part of the eye examination.  Without it, you have only had the front part of your eyes examined.  Having an eye examination without dilating drops is like going to the gynecologist or primary care doctor without taking your clothes off!

We use the dilating drops to get a better view of the retina in the back of the eye and the blood vessels that overly it.  The eye is the only place in the body where we can directly see these tiny blood vessels which can be affected by high blood pressure, diabetes and many other medical conditions.  We are also looking for retinal tears or masses that cannot be seen through a small pupil.

Most people can go about their regular day after dilation if they have sunglasses.  The problem comes with reading but if you are already in bifocals, your reading should not be too impaired.  Most people are back to normal within 3-4 hours after the exam.

Dr. Mark E. GermanSo just plan ahead.  If you are scheduled for a complete eye examination and find it difficult to function with dilating drops, arrange your schedule accordingly.  As long as you are having your eyes examined, you might as well have us evaluate your whole eye and not just the front part. At lease we don’t make you take your clothes off!

Dr. Mark German is an optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He welcomes patients of all ages to his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


WHICH LAKESHORE EYE DOCTOR IS FOR YOU? By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 2, 2016

There are two types of eye doctors: Optometrists and Ophthalmologists.  Both do complete eye examinations, prescribe glasses and screen for eye diseases such as glaucoma or cataracts.  The difference is that an ophthalmologist is a medical doctor and a surgeon.  If you have an active medical or surgical eye problem, then you should schedule with our ophthalmologist, Dr. Martha Jay.

If you have already had cataract surgery, have stable macular degeneration, have well controlled diabetes, have mild glaucoma or especially if you have no medical/surgical eye problems at all, then one of our optometrist may be your better choice. Dr. Mark German and I are the optometrists at Lakeshore Eye Care. Both of us see patients in the Mequon and the Saukville offices. As I am new to the practice, it may be easier to schedule with me.

I have been practicing optometry for over 20 years.  In that time, I have seen just about every eye problem out there.  While I specialize in contact lens fitting and general eye examinations, I also do annual screenings for diabetic eye disease, macular degeneration, glaucoma and other medical eye problems.  I joined Lakeshore Eye Care this month.

So not everyone needs their annual eye examination done with an eye surgeon. Dr. Jay mainly concentrates on the care of patients before and after cataract surgery or LASIK vision correction. Other patients can be just as well taken care of with either myself or Dr. German.  See you soon!

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. Ivanoski is an optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care in both the Mequon & Saukville offices.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


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