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WHICH LAKESHORE EYE DOCTOR IS FOR YOU? By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 2, 2016

There are two types of eye doctors: Optometrists and Ophthalmologists.  Both do complete eye examinations, prescribe glasses and screen for eye diseases such as glaucoma or cataracts.  The difference is that an ophthalmologist is a medical doctor and a surgeon.  If you have an active medical or surgical eye problem, then you should schedule with our ophthalmologist, Dr. Martha Jay.

If you have already had cataract surgery, have stable macular degeneration, have well controlled diabetes, have mild glaucoma or especially if you have no medical/surgical eye problems at all, then one of our optometrist may be your better choice. Dr. Mark German and I are the optometrists at Lakeshore Eye Care. Both of us see patients in the Mequon and the Saukville offices. As I am new to the practice, it may be easier to schedule with me.

I have been practicing optometry for over 20 years.  In that time, I have seen just about every eye problem out there.  While I specialize in contact lens fitting and general eye examinations, I also do annual screenings for diabetic eye disease, macular degeneration, glaucoma and other medical eye problems.  I joined Lakeshore Eye Care this month.

So not everyone needs their annual eye examination done with an eye surgeon. Dr. Jay mainly concentrates on the care of patients before and after cataract surgery or LASIK vision correction. Other patients can be just as well taken care of with either myself or Dr. German.  See you soon!

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. Ivanoski is an optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care in both the Mequon & Saukville offices.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


NEW ARRIVAL AT COLUMBIA-ST. MARY’S: NEW OPERATING MICROSCOPE By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 26, 2016

It has arrived: A fabulous new operating microscope at Columbia-St. Mary’s Hospital in Mequon for eye surgery!  I started using the new Zeiss Lumera 700 microscope last month and could not be more pleased.  Now only does the eye appear clearer through the new microscope but the unit is fully integrated for ease of use.

The Lumera has a special lighting system that highlights every detail of the eye, kind of like going from a regular to a high definition view. It also has a wider depth of focusing so I can see different parts in the eye all at once without refocusing. The result is a safer procedure and a happier doctor, what’s not to like?

As if those key attributes were not enough, now we have a monitor in the room so the operating room staff can know how the surgery is proceeding. While all microscopes have a foot pedal controls the lighting and focusing, the one for Lumera has many other programmable functions to suite each individual doctor. All that and no annoying wires – it runs on Bluetooth.

Cataract surgery may be a quick procedure but it involves many small steps. When I can see better and don’t have to take the time to keep refocusing, I can concentrate of what matters: achieving the best possible outcome for my patients.

So thank you Columbia-St. Mary’s Hospital! We already have the best cataract machine there (the Alcon Centurion) and now the state-of-the art operating microscope. Their commitment to excellence in eye care is much appreciated.

For more information about cataract symptoms and surgical options, call for an appointment or visit our web site. It is not your grandmother’s procedure.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and LASIK vision correction.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


I’M THE NEW FACE AT LAKESHORE EYE CARE! By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 18, 2016

Let me take this opportunity to introduce myself: I’m Dr. Jim Ivanoski and I am very pleased announce that I will be joining the great staff at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals next month in May. While I will be new to Lakeshore Eye Care, I am certainly not new to optometry.  I have over 20 years of experience enhancing the vision of those in southeastern Wisconsin.  I am already scheduling patients in both the Mequon and Saukville office and look forward being part of this fabulous combined optometry/ophthalmology practice.

While I specialize in contact lens fitting, my emphasis is on comprehensive eye examinations to evaluate the health of the eyes and how that relates to the patient’s other medical conditions. You will find that I am a good listener and will work with you to be sure you not only can see as well as possible but that all your concerns about your vision and eyes have been addressed.

Where did I come from? I did my undergraduate studies at the University of Wisconsin at Parkside. I then went on to be a top student at the Illinois College of Optometry, graduating Magna Cum Laude. My wife and two children make our home in West Bend.  In my free time, look for me on the golf course or rooting for the Packers.

Enough about me, what is really my point is that I look forward to meeting you. Call today to schedule your comprehensive eye examination in either office. Should you require cataract surgery or have an interest in LASIK vision correction, our doctors at Lakeshore Eye Care can take care of you every step of the way.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 

 


DARK CIRCLES UNDER YOUR EYES? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 4, 2016

What’s that all about and what can you do about it? Those dark circles can have many sources from heredity, allergies, smoking or dehydration.  As for heredity, you cannot do much about that but the other sources can be remedied.

If you have allergies, treat them with over-the-counter medication or ask your doctor for stronger products if they are not doing the trick. Be sure you do not rub your eyes as that just makes the circles worse. You could even try the Nedi pot to clear your system of the annoying substances that are making you miserable. If you smoke, you probably realize the toll it takes on your skin. The tiny blood vessels that nourish your skin are deprived of oxygen so the elasticity goes down – just another reason to quit. Sun exposure is another culprit so be sure to wear hats and sunglasses.

The biggest preventable cause of dark circles under the eyes is dehydration. If you eat a salty meal the fluid is pulled from the skin around your eyes revealing the dark circles. Excessive alcohol does the same thing. That’s where the “rough night” comments come from. Not getting enough sleep can also contribute.

What can you do about it once those circles appear? Get hydrated for one. Cooling the area is another. You can use cold compresses (cucumbers, ice packs, cold spoons). What you use does not matter, it is the cool temperature. There are many products sold for this problem, use at your own risk and be sure they are safe to use around your eyes. You can also get improvement by sleeping on several pillows. Finally there is the use of concealer, just be sure not to rub it on too aggressively.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including blade-free LASIK vision correction and small incision cataract surgery.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


LET ME INTRODUCE YOU… By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 28, 2016

From what I hear from our patients, what really stands out about Lakeshore Eye Care is our amazing staff. Not a day goes by without someone commenting on how nice they are and how much they learned from them. From the first phone call, throughout your exams or surgeries and finally through the quagmire of insurance billing, they have you covered.  Our doctors could not possibly get by without them and are very pleased that they have made an impression on you also.

Some especially important individuals who help facilitate your care are our Certified Ophthalmic Assistants and Technicians (COAs/COTs).  They work under our doctor’s direction and supervision to gather the pertinent information we need at each and every examination. They listen to your concerns and condense that information so we can effectively address them.  You leave with solutions for better vision and eye comfort.  Not only that but you learn a lot about how your eyes work too!

How did the technicians learn all this?  All of our COAs/COTs have completed an intense independent study course with clinical training that lasts at least two years.  They then have to pass either the COA or the COT level examinations. Furthermore, they participate in Continuing Medical Education courses every year to build their knowledge and skills with new technologies and developments.  Advances in medical and surgical eye care are constantly occurring and our techs make sure that they never get left behind.

Thank you techs, we could not do our job without you! And thank you kind patients for taking the time to complement them and other staff members on jobs well done.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care.  She is proud to work with all our techs: Catherine, Jodi, Leah, Amy, Laura and Lisa.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


YOU SEE WHAT YOU EAT?? By Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 12, 2016

There is that old saying that “You are what you eat” but that goes for your vision too! Many people think eating carrots is good for your eyes but sorry to say that’s not really true, you probably already get enough of the vitamin A they contain from other sources such as milk, cheese or egg yolk. Liver is not too popular but that also contains a healthy dose of vitamin A.

Leafy green vegetables, on the other hand, are very good for your eyes.  This is especially true if you have macular degeneration yourself or if a family member has it.  They are packed with lutein and zeaxanthin, antioxidants shown to decrease your risk of developing macular degeneration or even cataracts.

As uncontrolled diabetes or hypertension are not good for your eyes, dietary choices to improve those conditions are a boon for vision also. Lay off the salt and carbohydrates, maintain a healthy weight and be sure to get regular exercise to please your eyes not to mention your joints and heart.

Other easily overlooked lifestyle changes include wearing sunglasses on sunny days. Ultraviolet light exposure is also related to macular degeneration and cataracts. Those of you who are still smoking, you know it is not doing your heart or lungs any favors but did you know that it is associated with a 7 times increase in “wet” macular degeneration? That’s the type that affects reading and driving.

Dr. Josephine-Liezl P. Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto

Your eyes are depending on you to take care of yourself and them!  Load up on salads, pull out those sunglasses and those still smoking know what to do.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


WHY DON’T OUR SURGEONS FIT CONTACT LENSES? By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 2, 2016

At Lakeshore Eye Care, we have two types of eye doctors: Ophthalmologists (Drs. Martha Jay and Josephine-Liezl Cueto) and Optometrists (myself).  While all three of us take care of your eyes, the ophthalmologists are surgeons. They concentrate on medical and surgical problems of the eyes such as cataract surgery, LASIK vision correction, glaucoma and other conditions. They rarely see patients who don’t have a medical or surgical problem with their eyes.

My practice, in contrast, is more skewed towards those with healthy eyes such as those who need their glasses or contact lenses checked. While an eye exam with me is just a thorough as with the ophthalmologists, I am more likely screening for eye problems rather than treating those with serious pathology.

So that comes to the big question: Why don’t the ophthalmologists fit contact lenses?  Contact lenses change all the time and I am the one who stays on top of these new developments. There are new contact lenses for dry eyes, astigmatism and reading introduced all the time. That leaves the ophthalmologists plenty of time to devote to staying on top of the advances in medical and surgical eye care.

The bottom line is that if you have healthy eyes and wear contact lenses, your best bet is to schedule with me so I can screen for more serious eye problems and provide you with the best contact lens options. Thinking of moving on to LASIK or have we decided that your cataracts are ready for surgery? Then that is another story and the ophthalmologists will take it from there.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages to his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


WHAT’S CATARACT SURGERY LIKE? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 1, 2016

What exactly happens during cataract surgery?  Many with cataracts are afraid to have the surgery because they don’t really know what it would be like. Just the word “surgery” scares them. It brings to mind pain, long recovery and time off from your favorite activities. Nothing could be farther from the truth with cataract surgery.

Modern cataract surgery is done without shots, stitches or patches. It takes only about 10 to 15 minutes. We use only mild I.V. sedation to relax you.  You don’t feel anything because there are numbing drops applied to the surface of the eye. Afterwards, you look pretty much the way you did on the way in: no patch over the eye, no black and blue bruising. We recommend that you take 2 days off your regular activities, one for the actual procedure and the next day to allow your vision to settle. Then the only restrictions are no eye make-up, swimming or pushing on the eye for 2 weeks.

On the day of surgery, you change into a hospital gown and then an I.V. is started. Once in the operating room you look at a bright light. There IS NO PAIN. You may see pretty colors from a prism like effect of the lens as we remove it and replace it with a tiny plastic implant.  About 30 minutes after the procedure, you go home or even out to lunch. You do need a ride as some of the sedation may still be in effect but you won’t need extra help at home.

So, breath-in and breath-out, cataracts surgery is generally a quick and easy. It is the most common operation in America and patients are thrilled with the results.  If every procedure worked as well as cataract surgery, the world would be a much better place!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK vision correction.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


MY NICARAGUA MISSION TRIP Trip By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
February 22, 2016

Fr. Salvador Schlaefer of Campbellsport, Wisconsin was a newly ordained Capuchin Priest in 1947 when he was assigned to serve the people of Eastern Nicaragua in Central America. Many of the remote villages were only accessible by horseback, boat or on foot. He was later ordained Bishop of Bluefields, Nicaragua in 1970 and held that position until his death in 1993.
In 1997, the Capuchin Order invited Drs. Anthony and Ann Schlaefer, Fr. Sal’s brother and niece, to provide much needed eye care to the people of Puerto Cabazas, Nicaragua. 600 Nicaraguans received eye exams and glasses donated from the Campbellsport area churches and Lions club.
Since that time, this eye care group has expanded to 12 volunteers, returning every two years to remote Nicaraguan villages. This February, Drs. Ann Schlaefer, Laura Rau, Robert Moen and I, along with 14 others travelled to Waslala, Nicaragua. It is an area northeast of Managua that took seven hours to get to by bus. We performed eye exams on over 1000 people, dispensed over 1100 pairs of prescription glasses and handed out over 1000 pairs of sunglasses. It had been 8 years since any mission group had been to this area to provide eye care.
It was an honor to help perform these eye exams and to represent Marilyn and Leo Schlaefer, Bishop Sal’s cousin and my aunt and uncle. We put in long 11 hour days but the smiles on their faces made it well worth it after allowing those people to see clearly-many of them for the first time in their life.
Dr. Mark E. German Dr. Mark German is an Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals specializing in general eye care and hard-to-fit contact lens patients. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.
For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


OPHTHALMOLOGISTS WERE AMERICA’S FIRST BOARD CERTIFIED PHYSICIANS By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
February 15, 2016

Nearly one hundred years ago, in December of 1916, the first group of pioneering eye surgeons traveled to Memphis, Tennessee to demonstrate their commitment to excellence in patient care.  They sat for the first board certification examination of any physician specialty.  Back then it was called the American Board for Ophthalmic Examinations.

The American Board of Otolaryngology (Ear, Nose and Throat) was not established until 1924 and the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology followed in 1930.  Now every medical specialty has a board certification process, but ophthalmology led the way. The name changed to the American Board of Ophthalmology in 1933.

Then, as now, not all those who undertook the process passed. Ten physicians were board certified that first year but 3 more were invited to study harder and return in another year.  Since that that first examination, 30,000 ophthalmologist have become board certified including myself and my colleague Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto.

What does board certification mean and why is it important? The examination process assures that your doctor has the knowledge provide you with the best possible care.  The process begins with an intensive written qualifying exam covering all aspects of eye care. Once you have passed by doing well in all seven sections (and many don’t), it is on to a grueling oral exam a year or so later.

Dr. Cueto and I are proud to be part of this grand tradition. As with those doctors in 1916, we are committed to providing the highest quality medical and surgical eye care available.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery, blade-free LASIK, macular degeneration care, glaucoma care, dry eye treatments and more.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


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