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CATARACT SURGERY IMPROVES YOUR OUTLOOK ON LIFE By Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
July 27, 2015

When you think of cataract surgery, generally the visual improvement that comes to mind is an improvement in clarity but there are other added benefits: you color vision improves also. Cataracts cause the lens inside your eye to turn a yellow/brown, which makes blues look darker, and whites to have a yellowed appearance. Before surgery this is not very noticeable as the change is gradual. When we do cataract surgery, we replace the yellowed natural lens with a clear plastic implant. Then, overnight, blues appear more vivid and whites whiter!  Since we operate on one eye at a time, the difference between eyes while waiting for the second eye to have cataract surgery can be a little strange. Once both eyes have the implants however, the world looks not only clearer but more colorful too!

How do you know if you have cataracts? Generally the symptoms include blurred distance vision, especially for driving at night. Sometimes you see glare or halos around lights. The actual diagnosis has to be made by your eye doctor after a complete, dilated eye examination. There are many other possible sources of blurred vision.  Some are minor and others are more serious. You could just need an adjustment in your glasses prescription or you could have a problem with your retina such as macular degeneration.

Dr. Josephine-Liezl P. Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto

To get started on improving your outlook on life, schedule an eye examination and we will determine how to make you see as well as possible. Should your problem be cataracts, the surgery takes only 10-25 minutes and you don’t have to worry about shots, stitches or patches. See you soon!

For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


UNIDENTIFIED FLOATING OBJECTS IN YOUR VISION? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
July 13, 2015

Do you have little spots moving around in your vision?  They are probably "floaters" or, in the medical term, vitreous opacities.  While floaters are usually only an annoyance, a change in their appearance could be caused by a retinal tear or even a retinal detachment.  Both need immediate attention.

The eye is filled with a gelatin-like material called vitreous.  Over time, it breaks down - becoming more liquid with small collagen particles casting a shadow on the retina.  The result is the appearance of small spots, squiggly lines, clouds or spider webs moving across your vision.  Flashes of light occur when the fluid shifts within the eye, tugging on the retina (the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye). The combination of flashes of light and/or a dramatic increase in floaters could indicate that the retina is tearing and in danger of detaching. Because a retinal detachment can result in blindness, treatment must be sought immediately.

The bottom line is that an occasional floater is not a problem.  But if you should see an abrupt increase in floaters, flashing lights or a loss of part of your vision in one eye, you need to be evaluated by an eye care professional within 24-48 hours to rule-out a retinal detachment.

Are you having an eye problem or are you due for a comprehensive eye examination? Then give us a call.  You can be assured that we provide the latest in medical and surgical eye care.  We welcome patients of all ages and accept most insurance plans.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


BOARD CERTIFICATION By Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
July 7, 2015

Most patients may not be aware if their doctors are “Board Certified” unless they notice a fancy plaque on the wall. But what does this mean exactly?

In ophthalmology, a “Board Certified” doctor has successfully completed 4 years of medical school and then another 4 years of an Ophthalmology Residency to learn the specifics of medical and surgical eye care. They are then challenged with a series of tests that take a minimum of three years to complete.  The first is an intensive written qualifying exam. This 250 question test has seven sections, each covering a different aspect of eye care. Each question requires knowledge of obscure as well as common eye problems.

Once you make it passed that by doing well in all seven sections (and many don’t), it is on to the oral exam a year or so later. Wisconsin doctors are tested in San Francisco.  Imagine the scene: scores of anxious young doctors sitting in the hallway of an upscale hotel. They are individually called into regular hotel rooms where an examiner shows them photos of eye problems and gives them some history. You are asked what you see, what you are going to do. “Are you sure? Is that so?” are common responses just to throw you off. The oral exam has 6 sections, again you must do well on all of them.

I am very proud to say that all the Ophthalmologists at Lakeshore Eye Care are Board Certified! But the certification only lasts 10 years. During that time, we keep informed about new aspects of care by attending medical education meetings and reading professional journals. So you can be proud of our doctors here, we sure are!

Dr. Josephine-Liezl P. Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery, glaucoma care, diabetic eye care, macular degeneration, dry eyes and more.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


EYE SMART TIPS: SAFETY ON THE FOURTH, PART TWO!

By editor
June 29, 2015

Find more information about 4th of July eye safety at the link below from the Academy of Ophthalmology:

EYE SMART TIPS: SAFETY ON THE FOURTH OF JULY


EYE SAFETY & THE FOURTH By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
June 22, 2015

The best season of the year is fast approaching: fireworks season!  Wisconsinites can look forward to local city and town celebrations, larger ones on Milwaukee’s lakefront and even some very small family displays.  However, it is important to take eye safety into consideration amidst all the “oohs and aahs” this summer.

Some tips for avoiding injury are obvious-don’t point the fireworks towards anyone, don’t let small children handle them and be sure to read the instructions carefully.  Surprisingly our most common 4th of July injury does not come from improper handling of fireworks but from flying cinders.  These types of burns can happen at large, professionally run shows as well as the small do-it-yourself variety.

Should you or someone in your family have such a problem, first rinse the eye thoroughly with water or artificial tears.  If there is a change in vision or continued pain, a visit to an emergency room or with your eye care professional may be indicated.

Most cinder injuries are minor, in that they heal up without lasting damage, but they can be quite painful for hours.  The key to rapid healing is to be sure no particles are left in the eye and to keep the eye lubricated with tear drops.  If there is an actual burn, antibiotic eye drops or ointment are sometimes necessary.  These would have to be prescribed by an eye care professional or an emergency room physician.

At Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals we are equipped to triage and treat many of these accidental summertime injuries, although we hope you don’t need our services this 4th of July season! Stay safe and happy celebrating!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including blade-free LASIK vision correction and small incision cataract surgery with premium lens implants. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


CATCH MORE Z’S AND SEE BETTER By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
June 8, 2015

Burning the candle at both ends? Neglecting your sleep can have an adverse effect on your vision and your eyes by worsening dry eye symptoms. Dry eye syndrome is one of the most common reasons for a visit to an eye doctor, affecting 3.25 million women in the US over the age of 50.  A recent study showed that sleep deprivation can lead to worsening dry eye symptoms.

The symptoms of dry eye syndrome include feeling like there is something in your eye, blurred vision and excessive tearing. The last symptom, tearing, is what gets patients confused. “I thought my eyes were too wet”, is the usual comment.  Your tear film is made up of oil, water and mucus. If your mixture of the three is abnormal, it poorly covers the surface of the eye leaving dry spots. The tiny nerve endings in the surface of the eye (the cornea) detect the problem and send out more, poor quality tears resulting in the annoying drip down your face. This problem is particularly noticeable at the end of the day, after reading or using a computer, in winter or when you are out in the wind.

The study published in the medical journal Investigative Ophthalmology last summer divided a group of 20 healthy individuals into two groups: one stayed up all night and the other had an 8 hour sleep period. The “all nighters” had very salty tears which poorly covered their eyes.  Their eyes were uncomfortable and their vision blurred.

The lesson here is that your eyes need rest too, especially if you already have dry eye symptoms or wear contact lenses. Should adequate rest not solve your dry eye symptoms, however, we are here to help.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an optometrist practicing with Drs. Martha Jay and Josephine-Liezl Cueto at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He specialized in comprehensive eye care, especially for those interested in contact lenses who have had problems getting the appropriate fit in the past.  He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


EXERCISE AND MACULAR DEGENERATION By Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
June 2, 2015

While only 1 in 4 of those between the ages of 65 and 74 years-old exercise on a regular basis, there is growing evidence that the other 3 should get off the couch!  Regular exercise helps with more than just conditioning; it can improve your balance, mood, decrease dementia risk and improve many chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. A recent study also showed that regular exercise can even help with macular degeneration, the leading cause of legal blindness for those over 65 years-old.

The study was published in the February issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. A group at Emery Eye Center in Atlanta had mice run on a treadmill and then attempted to induce macular degeneration with a toxic light source, a commonly used model in macular degeneration in research. The mice “worked out” on the treadmill for 1 hour per day for two weeks, were then exposed to the toxic light and followed up with another 2 weeks on the treadmill. Those who worked out had nearly twice the number of undamaged retinal cells than those who lounged in their cages.

Never exercised before? There are plenty of options in the area or you could just walk around the block on a regular basis. Many of my patients take advantage of the Silver Sneakers program at “the Y” or similar opportunities at local gyms.

You can improve your outlook on life and become happier and healthier with regular exercise. Other good advice is to keep up with those leafy green vegetables, be sure to quit smoking if you still do, and pull out those sunglasses on sunny days.   Also, if we have not seen you in the last 1-2 years, it is time to call for you complete eye examination.

Dr. Josephine-Liezl P. Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including  small incision cataract surgery, macular degeneration, glaucoma, dry eyes and more. She welcomes new patients to her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


11 Impossibly Cool Facts You May Not Know About Your Vision from Buzzfeed

By editor
June 1, 2015

Click below:

http://www.buzzfeed.com/acuvue/impossibly-cool-facts-you-may-not-know-about-yo?bfsms=1&utm_term=.cyYgaNZMP


BASEBALL VS FOOTBALL EYES By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
May 13, 2015

Are your eyes more like a football or a baseball?

Been following the Brewers? Baseball is not just a sport but also a way to explain the shape of your eyes.  You have “football eyes” if the front of your eyes are curved like a football. This is called astigmatism.  You have “baseball eyes” if the front of your eyes are more rounded like a baseball.

It is important to know if you have “football” or “baseball” eyes if you are considering cataract surgery.  The differences between the two determine which implant options are available to you at the time of surgery.  Cataract surgery is a very safe and relatively easy procedure to go through.  We gently remove your natural cloudy lens and replace it with a clear implant to improve your vision.

The latest advancements in cataract surgery allow us to take advantage of more implant choices than previously available. If you have football eyes, you would see better afterwards if we place a Toric implant at the time of your cataract surgery.  If you have baseball eyes, then you could benefit from a Multi-focal implant that allows you to see far away, intermediate and close up after your surgery without glasses.  These bifocal-like implants let you turn back the clock and be relatively free of glasses after your procedure.

How can you tell if you have football or baseball eyes?  How do you know which implant is optimal for you at the time of your cataract surgery?  We guide you through the options available to you during your cataract evaluation.  Remember, you only have cataract surgery once so it is important to consider all the possibilities to optimize your vision.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


MYTH BUSTER: CARROTS HELP YOUR VISION By Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
May 12, 2015

Sorry if you heard this from your mother, but eating more carrots will probably not have much of an effect on your night vision.  Carrots, broccoli, sweet potatoes, pumpkin and leafy green vegetables all contain beta-carotene which is a carotenoid. That means that they contain a pro-vitamin that is converted to vitamin A in the body but on an as-needed basis. So if you already have a balanced diet, the excessive consumption of carrots won’t have much effect on your vitamin A levels.

Another source of vitamin A is from liver, cod-liver oil, fish oil and butter. They contain retinoids which, when consumed in excess, directly increase your vitamin A levels.   So as is the advice on most dietary factors, balance is the key.

Vitamin A deficiency is rare in the US but, in keeping with our last column about worldwide eye care, is seen with malnutrition in developing countries. Especially susceptible are pregnant women and small children. In fact, 1/3 of all children under 5 worldwide have a vitamin A deficiency. The result can be night vision problems and poor resistance to infection. One place where we do see vitamin A deficiency in the US is with alcohol abuse. Alcoholics tend to have a poor diet and the retinoids they do consume are broken down faster.

They bottom line is eat your vegetables, don’t smoke or quit if you do, and wear sunglasses on a regular basis. These are your best strategies for maintaining good vision.  Also important is regular eye care.  That means a complete, dilated eye exam at least every two years or more frequently if you have diabetes, macular degeneration or glaucoma.

Dr. Josephine-Liezl P. Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto is a board certified ophthalmolgist (Eye Physician and Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery, glaucoma treatment, dry eye therapies, macular degeneration management and more. She practices at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Drs. Martha Jay and Mark German. Dr. Cueto welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans, including Medicare Assignment.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


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