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WHEN IS A VISUAL HALLUCINATION NOT A CAUSE FOR ALARM? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
February 2, 2016

I once had a patient state very calmly that there was an army in her backyard filming a movie. Her family was quite concerned and worried that she was developing dementia or a serious mental illness. Fortunately neither was the case.  These “hallucinations” were caused by a condition called the Charles Bonnet Syndrome.

This syndrome occurs in those with limited vision.  In my experience, it is generally seen in patients with severe macular degeneration but recently a patient came in with this who had suffered a stroke affecting his vision on one side. Only 10-40% of those with severe vision loss experience the syndrome. Charles Bonnet was a Swiss philosopher who first described these visual hallucinations in 1760 after observing his grandfather who was going blind from cataracts.

The mechanism is thought to be due to the brain filling in for the reduced visual input. The episodes last from seconds to minutes and are of variable frequency. About 18 months after the onset they just usually gradually disappear. The most common type involves faces of people but animals or plants may also be seen. The images appear smaller than in real life.  Another hallmark is that vision is the only sense involved so there are no associated abnormal sounds or smells.

What to do if you yourself or a family member are experiencing this syndrome? First be sure to have a thorough eye examination to see if there are any treatment options for the vision loss. If none are available, then reassurance from family and friends about what is real and what is not is helpful for the patient.  Hopefully the above explanation will set all involved at ease.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is an Eye Physician & Surgeon (Ophthalmologist) practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.  She specializes in blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


WHY DO MY EYELIDS TWITCH? By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
February 1, 2016

An eyelid twitch is a general term for spasms of the eyelid muscles that happen without your control. Eye twitching, eyelid tics and spasms are pretty common. Typically it only affects one lid, usually the lower lid or upper lid of one eye is involved, but it can also involve both eyelids. Most eye twitches come and go, although they can last for weeks or even months. Episodes of eyelid twitching are unpredictable. The twitch may occur off and on for several days. Then, you may not experience any twitching for weeks or even months.
Called myokymia in doctor lingo, these rippling muscle contractions in an eyelid can be triggered by many things. Stress, tiredness, dry eyes, alcohol, caffeine, and allergies all can contribute to twitchy eyelids. Most of the eyelid twitches are benign and do not have a serious underlying medical condition. Many eyelid twitches will resolve without treatment. Usually getting more rest, reducing your caffeine intake and using artificial tears to lubricate your eyes will help reduce twitching eyelids.
A lot of times eyelid twitches are hard to treat because the underlying cause needs to be determined and then this needs to be dealt with. If the spasms become chronic, you may have what’s known as “benign essential blepharospasm,” which is the name for chronic and uncontrollable eyelid movement. If your twitching eyelid is persistent and lasts for some time, then you should have your eyes examined to help determine the cause. In more severe cases where the twitching does not stop or a muscle spasm occurs(closure of the eye), Botox injections are used to stop the muscle contractions if nothing else relieves the twitching.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an Optometrist practicing with Drs. Martha Jay and Josephine-Liezl Cueto at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


HOW LONG SHOULD I SCHEDULE FOR MY EYE EXAM? By Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
January 19, 2016

A complete eye examination at Lakeshore Eye Care is a thorough medical evaluation of your eyes. It starts with a review of your medical and surgical history along with your current medications and allergic reactions to medications. Your family medical history is also reviewed as many medical conditions affecting the eyes run in families. Your blood pressure is measured.

We move on to any specific problems you may be having with your vision and your eyes: How long the problem has been bothering you, what makes it worse or better, how it impacts your daily activities and other important factors relating to your visual well-being.   Then we measure your current glasses and your vision with those glasses; check your eye movements, pupils and side vision; see if we can improve your vision with a different glasses prescription (refraction); and measure your eye pressure.

At that point drops are put in your eyes to open the pupils so our doctors can further evaluate the health of your eyes.  These drops take some time to work so that gives you a little break before the doctor comes in.  Our doctors then recheck your refraction, review the data gathered by the technicians, and view the eyes through the microscope (slit lamp) for cataracts or retinal problems like macular degeneration.

We then explain any problems you may have and formulate a plan for relief. If surgery is in order, the actual procedure is discussed along with the risks and benefits. That leaves plenty of time for your questions so you can fully understand your options.  How long should you schedule for your eye exam? All this takes time, generally at least 1 to 1-1/2 hours.  Your vision is precious; you don’t want us to miss anything in a rush.

Dr. Josephine-Liezl P. Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery, macular degeneration care, dry eye treatment, glaucoma care and more.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


YOU WANT TO PUT PLUGS IN MY EYELIDS?? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
January 13, 2016

When we suggest punctal “plugs” to a patient, the reaction varies from curiosity to outright panic.  While they are quite routine dry eye care, many patients have not heard of them.  The goal of the plugs is to keep the tears you have in your eyes longer, decreasing your need for tear supplements and improving your eye comfort.

On the upper and lower eyelids in each eye, there are a total of 4 small openings towards the nose which are called puncta.  Each leads to a tiny tube that drains your tears into the back of your nose. The bottom ones carry about 2/3 of the tears and the top the other 1/3. If we block the bottom puncta in each eye, your eyes stay wetter. The plugs are very small, about 1-2 mm, and made of soft plastic. They are easily inserted in the office in a matter of seconds.

Generally we do not suggest plugs at the first signs of dry eyes. We try artificial tears first. If the patient feels that they need to use the tears more than 4 times per day or they are not providing any relief, then plugs or a prescription product called Restasis may be suggested. Restasis changed the quality of the tears so they coat the eye better. As noted above, the plugs change the quantity of the tears. Sometimes both quality and quantity need improvement. Should that be the case, then plugs and Restasis might be used together.

Winter is dry eye season! The symptoms include blurred reading vision at the end of the day, feeling like there is something in the eyes, eye fatigue, red eyes and more. Give us a call if you need relief from this common eye problem.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care. For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.

 


BLUE EYED PEOPLE ARE ALL RELATED... YOU JUST HAVE TO GO BACK A FEW YEARS!

By editor
December 21, 2015

Check out this link to see where you came from if you have blue eyes.


THAT HOLIDAY TOAST MAY DRY YOUR EYES By Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
December 19, 2015

You may find that your eyes feel dry this holiday season and there are a couple of reasons why. One reason is that the air is dryer in winter and so are your eyes. Dry eye symptoms always worsen in the winter months. But there may be another reason. A study published in the respected journal Ophthalmology reported that alcohol consumption actually makes your eyes dryer.

The study subjects were young men without any history of dry eyes. They were divided into two groups, one group had an alcoholic beverage between 8 and 10 pm and the other did not. They then had their eyes examined at midnight and again at 6 and 8 am the next day.  At all three points the group that had the alcoholic beverage showed signs of dry eyes while the other group did not.

Is this news you can use? Sure, if you already have dry eyes you may want to bring along some artificial tears to that holiday party. This is certainly important if you wear contact lenses as they absorb your tear film leaving less to bathe the eye. If you do this and your eyes are still uncomfortable, then you should probably take the contacts out and switch to glasses. You do not want to risk starting out the new year with a bad infection or by damaging your eyes.

Besides tears, there are a number of other treatments for dry eyes. Be sure to discuss this when you come in for your regularly scheduled exam.  You should come in sooner if you have been experiencing worsening dry eye symptoms such as eye pain, blurred vision or feeling like there is something in your eyes.

Dr. Josephine-Liezl P. Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including dry eye treatment, cataract surgery, macular degeneration care, glaucoma management and more.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


FASTEST LASIK IN THE U.S. JUST CAME TO LAKESHORE EYE CARE! By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
December 14, 2015

Just when I thought LASIK was as quick and precise as it could possibly be, several new breakthroughs came along to make it even better.  Last month I upgraded both the lasers I use for LASIK vision correction to take advantage these new innovations. The faster, safer and more precise laser system means that you can expect to have even more spectacular vision after the procedure.

WaveLight Laser Suite

I had been using the IntraLase and VISX lasers for a number of years but once those companies were acquired by a larger corporation, it seemed that innovation became stalled. Then Alcon came out with FS 200 Fentosecond laser to make the initial flap and the WaveLight EX500 Excimer laser for contouring the cornea to improve vision.  Together they provide an integrated laser system that is the fastest available in the U.S.

The lasers are not just faster, they are also more precise.  The improvement in vision, especially for those with more extreme prescriptions, is even better than before. They also open up LASIK to many who may not have been candidates in the past because they can treat the widest range of prescriptions of any laser available.

Patients love the improved comfort and potential to see even better than they did with glasses or contacts before surgery. I appreciate the precise automation with the smallest laser spot size in the industry and fastest eye tracking system available:  20 times faster than natural eye movements! I’ve gained many more options for individualizing LASIK  for a particular patient and you’ve gained an improved outlook on life.

For more information, visit our web site to access brand new videos about the new WaveLight system and to see what you can expect on your procedure day: http://www.lakeshorevision.com/services/ilasik/#main

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist (Eye Physician and Surgeon) who was the first ophthalmologist in the Milwaukee area to perform laser vision correction. She has been at the forefront of every advancement since then.  Call today to arrange your screening exam to take advantage of the newest of the new!

262-241-1919


YULETIDE EYE HAZARDS By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin (near Cedarburg, Grafton, River Hills and other North Shore Communities)

By editor
December 1, 2015

You may think that eye injury season is over now that most outdoor sports are only a memory but think again!  This is the time of year when we start seeing holiday related eye injuries due to festive decorating or automobile accidents.

A perennial favorite is the Christmas tree injury.  This can happen while cutting down the tree, moving the tree or decorating it.  You are looking at where you are cutting the tree or placing that precious ornament but don’t notice the adjacent branch near your eye.  This type of injury may not hurt initially but hours later significant eye pain may develop.

Hanging decorations are another potential hazard.  They are temporarily secured with tape or tacks but that doesn’t mean they will stay there!  Watch for falling ornaments or other forms of holiday cheer.

It’s also a dangerous place out there in Santa’s workshop.  Santa’s helpers may not be accustomed to using power tools needed for that surprise project. Also, be sure to pick up safety goggles when gathering the other supplies needed.

On a more serious note, you want to drive defensively to avoid impaired drivers returning from Holiday parties.  While air bags may save your life in a collision, they also can result in significant eye injuries by hitting your eyes and face or from abrasions caused by the powder they are packed in.

Should an accident occur affecting your eyes, we are here to help but would just as soon have you avoid the pain and trouble.  So be careful, take your time and have a safe December. Happy Holidays!

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals who specializes in comprehensive eye care for all ages, especially those interested in contact lenses. He welcomes the challenge of patients who have had difficulty finding a proper contact lens fit in the past, whether due to comfort or vision.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


Eyes red with swimming? Read this!

By editor
November 29, 2015

Good thing summer is over... but not such good news for those who love swimming pools! Click on the image below for a new study about why your eyes get red in the pool.


DON’T LET DRY EYES DEFEAT YOU By Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
November 24, 2015

Do your eyes sometimes sting and burn, feel gritty or tear excessively?  Have these symptoms become even worse with the onset of cold weather?  If so, you may have dry eyes.  Do not worry...you are not alone.  About 59 million Americans suffer from dry eyes.  The condition is more common in women and in those over 65 years of age. The symptoms are worse in the winter, when you are out in the wind, after reading for a while or after extended computer use. The problem starts with poor quality tears. Your tears have oil, water and mucus in them and the proportions change with time. This leaves the surface of the eye dry, stimulating the tear glands to produce more watery tears.

To help alleviate the symptoms, our first line of treatment is tear replacement with over-the-counter artificial tears.  Do not be intimidated by the wide variety of tears to choose from on the store shelves. You may have to try a few of them to find your preferred choice.   If that does not work, we can try punctal plugs to block the tears you have from leaving the eye.  These tiny “corks” can be placed easily in the office and are often quite successful.  Another route is the use of prescription drops such as Restasis that change the quality of your tears so they coat the eye more effectively.

Don’t try to diagnose yourself, however.  If you think you have some of the symptoms above you should schedule a comprehensive eye examination.  We will thoroughly evaluate your eyes and your vision and determine the appropriate remedy for your situation.  We can help – don’t let dry eyes defeat you!

Dr. Josephine-Liezl P. Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as dry eyes, cataract surgery, glaucoma care and more. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


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