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BASEBALL VS FOOTBALL EYES By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
May 13, 2015

Are your eyes more like a football or a baseball?

Been following the Brewers? Baseball is not just a sport but also a way to explain the shape of your eyes.  You have “football eyes” if the front of your eyes are curved like a football. This is called astigmatism.  You have “baseball eyes” if the front of your eyes are more rounded like a baseball.

It is important to know if you have “football” or “baseball” eyes if you are considering cataract surgery.  The differences between the two determine which implant options are available to you at the time of surgery.  Cataract surgery is a very safe and relatively easy procedure to go through.  We gently remove your natural cloudy lens and replace it with a clear implant to improve your vision.

The latest advancements in cataract surgery allow us to take advantage of more implant choices than previously available. If you have football eyes, you would see better afterwards if we place a Toric implant at the time of your cataract surgery.  If you have baseball eyes, then you could benefit from a Multi-focal implant that allows you to see far away, intermediate and close up after your surgery without glasses.  These bifocal-like implants let you turn back the clock and be relatively free of glasses after your procedure.

How can you tell if you have football or baseball eyes?  How do you know which implant is optimal for you at the time of your cataract surgery?  We guide you through the options available to you during your cataract evaluation.  Remember, you only have cataract surgery once so it is important to consider all the possibilities to optimize your vision.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


MYTH BUSTER: CARROTS HELP YOUR VISION By Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
May 12, 2015

Sorry if you heard this from your mother, but eating more carrots will probably not have much of an effect on your night vision.  Carrots, broccoli, sweet potatoes, pumpkin and leafy green vegetables all contain beta-carotene which is a carotenoid. That means that they contain a pro-vitamin that is converted to vitamin A in the body but on an as-needed basis. So if you already have a balanced diet, the excessive consumption of carrots won’t have much effect on your vitamin A levels.

Another source of vitamin A is from liver, cod-liver oil, fish oil and butter. They contain retinoids which, when consumed in excess, directly increase your vitamin A levels.   So as is the advice on most dietary factors, balance is the key.

Vitamin A deficiency is rare in the US but, in keeping with our last column about worldwide eye care, is seen with malnutrition in developing countries. Especially susceptible are pregnant women and small children. In fact, 1/3 of all children under 5 worldwide have a vitamin A deficiency. The result can be night vision problems and poor resistance to infection. One place where we do see vitamin A deficiency in the US is with alcohol abuse. Alcoholics tend to have a poor diet and the retinoids they do consume are broken down faster.

They bottom line is eat your vegetables, don’t smoke or quit if you do, and wear sunglasses on a regular basis. These are your best strategies for maintaining good vision.  Also important is regular eye care.  That means a complete, dilated eye exam at least every two years or more frequently if you have diabetes, macular degeneration or glaucoma.

Dr. Josephine-Liezl P. Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto is a board certified ophthalmolgist (Eye Physician and Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery, glaucoma treatment, dry eye therapies, macular degeneration management and more. She practices at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Drs. Martha Jay and Mark German. Dr. Cueto welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans, including Medicare Assignment.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


WHAT’S “VISION FORWARD”? By Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
April 28, 2015

In 2010, the two agencies in the Milwaukee area that support those with vision impairments merged. The Badger Association of the Blind and Visually Impaired Adults and the Center for Blind and Visually Impaired Children combined to become the Vision Forward Association. The new organization serves all ages with expanded programming. In my practice, the most common type of vision impairment is in adults with macular degeneration. Should a patient come to a point where their vision is not improving with treatments and they are having difficulty with activities of daily life, we suggest that they take advantage of the services offered by Vision Forward.

The Vision Forward store specializes in household products that are easier for those with limited vision to operate such as phones with large numbers and talking watches. The store is located on Hawley Road in Milwaukee, just north of Wisconsin Avenue near Doyne Park Golf Course. They have a mobile store also that last week was in West Bend at the Cedar Ridge Retirement Apartments.

Dr. Josephine-Liezl P. Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto

While the store is great, we strongly suggest that the patient schedule a Low Vision evaluation with Vision Forward. This is an in depth assessment with a trained specialist to determine which devices (magnifiers, signature guides, monitors) and services (such as free directory assistance, books on tape) would be beneficial. As they are a non-profit organization, they are not out to sell you the most expensive products available. They want to find out what the needs are and what works best for that individual. For more information, contact Vision Forward by calling 414-615-0100 or visiting www.Vision-Forward.org.

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including macular degeneration, dry eyes, cataracts, glaucoma and more. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


LASIK OR CONTACTS: WHICH IS SAFER? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
April 16, 2015

If you don’t like glasses, your alternatives include contact lenses or LASIK vision correction. We know that LASIK is more convenient and saves you money in the long run but which is the safer alternative? You’ll be surprised to learn that that actually LASIK is safer than wearing contact lenses. As a comprehensive ophthalmologist, I treat all types of eye problems. It is much more common for a contact lens wearer to come in with a severe eye problem than someone who has had LASIK.

Up to 6% of contact lens wearers per year experience a severe eye infection, worsening dry eye symptoms or even an allergy to contact lenses themselves. These and other problems are not only painful but can lead to permanent vision loss and an inability to resume contact use or have LASIK in the future.

As LASIK safety is not the same everywhere you go, select your LASIK surgeon carefully.  All my patients benefit from blade-free LASIK using two lasers instead of one.  It is almost impossible to have a complication during this type of LASIK procedure. That’s why we call it “LASIK for Chickens.”

If you have been thinking about LASIK, consider your odds of a problem if you stay in contacts. You knew that LASIK simplifies your life and is more cost effective; now add safety to the list favoring LASIK.  Give us 20 minutes and we can turn those contacts into a distant memory.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

While taking the blade out of the LASIK equation allows more patients to be good candidates, there still are exceptions. To see if LASIK is an option for you, call for your personalized screening exam.  It’s complimentary and pressure-free.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including blade-free LASIK, small incision cataract surgery with premium bifocal and astigmatism implants, glaucoma care, macular degeneration management, dry eye therapies and more. She practices with Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto and Dr. Mark German at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.  Patients of all ages are welcome and most insurance plans accepted.

For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.

 


ARMS TOO SHORT? By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
April 10, 2015

It is not uncommon for friends and neighbors to stop me at social events, after work or even while running errands and ask the same question: “What can I do to read now that I’m in my 40’s?” Almost everyone goes through this frustrating change of not being able to see close-up and far-away with the same pair of glasses around this time in their lives. This nuisance is caused by a degeneration of the proteins of the lens (located behind your pupil) causing it to harden over time. The tiny muscles that have served you so well for focusing since childhood cannot overcome this new challenge.

So what can you do about it? It’s all about trade-offs to find what works best for you. The options include glasses, contact lenses, LASIK or even cataract surgery. As for glasses, you can get one pair for distance and one for near or combine the two in a bifocal. Some patients are lucky enough to be able to see close up by just taking their glasses off.

As for contact lens options, there are bifocal contacts, monovision contacts (using one eye for near and the other for distance) or you can wear reading glasses over the contacts. If you like monovision, then you can replicate that with LASIK and avoid the hassles of contacts. Although monovision may seem like an odd alternative, don’t dismiss it too quickly as many patients do wonderfully with this option.

If you are ready for cataract surgery, there are bifocal implants that can help you eliminate the glasses altogether. You can even have those special premium implants without having cataracts but the upcharge is more. We can find which of the many options are best for you at your next exam.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He specialized in hard-to-fit contact lens wearers and general eye care.  Together, the three doctors offer comprehensive medical and surgical eye care including blade-free LASIK, small incision cataract surgery, dry eye therapies, macular degeneration management, contact lens fitting and more.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


SHINGLES (HERPES ZOSTER) AND THE EYE By Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
April 8, 2015

Herpes Zoster, commonly known as shingles, can cause a painful skin rash with oozing blisters that typically affect one side of the body.  It is caused by the varicella zoster virus which is the same virus responsible for chickenpox in the patient years earlier.  After the initial illness with chickenpox, the virus remains dormant in the body only to reappear as shingles at a later time.  There is about a 30% lifetime risk of developing shingles and the chances increase with age due to weakening of the immune system.

Shingles can affect any part of the skin but about 20-25% of the time it occurs around the eyes.  Patients can present with a severe rash around their eyes and develop conjunctivitis (swelling of the eye), keratitis (infection within the cornea) or uveitis (inflammation in the inner layers of the eye).  All of these problems can lead to chronic inflammation, permanent loss of vision and even debilitating pain called post-herpetic neuralgia.  Depending on the severity of the infection, treatments may include prescription eye drops or oral anti-viral medications.

Are there any ways to prevent this? While there is no 100% effective solution, the shingles vaccine is 60-70% effective in reducing the chances of developing herpes zoster or post-herpetic neuralgia as well as decreasing the severity of outbreak.  The FDA has recommended the vaccine for anyone age 50 years or older.  Talk to your primary care doctor about whether the shingles vaccine is appropriate for you.

Should you develop shingles around your eyes, you doctor will probably suggest we see you to determine if further treatment is indicated.

Dr. Josephine-Liezl P. Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care. She practices at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Mark German. Together they provide comprehensive eye care for all ages including blade-free LASIK, small incision cataract surgery, dry eye therapies, glaucoma care, macular degeneration management, contact lens fitting, diabetic eye care and general eye examinations.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


LOOKING FOR A LIFT? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
March 23, 2015

Dr. Neda Esmaili

Are you beginning to look a little like your parents with drooping eyelids? Do people ask you if you are tired or had a rough night when you are well rested? It might be time to consider doing something to bring your appearance back to where you would like it to be. We have just the answer for you in our newest doctor, Neda Esmaili. She is a fellowship trained oculoplastics surgeon. That means that she is an ophthalmologist, just like myself and Dr. Cueto, who has then completed a 2 year fellowship in eye plastic surgery.

Dr. Esmaili is seeing patients in our Mequon office one day per week. The rest of the time she can be found at the Eye Institute where she recently joined the faculty. She offers a full range of possibilities for looking your best including non-surgical options such as botox and fillers.  She also takes care of more serious problems such as tumors around the eyes or eyelids, thyroid related issues such as double vision or prominent eyes, eyelids that turn in or turn out, blocked tear ducts and more.

We are very pleased to welcome Dr. Esmaili to our practice. She and Dr. Deborah Costakos, our pediatric ophthalmologist, are providing a much needed presence on this side of town for those seeking specialized medical and surgical eye care. They round out our eye care offerings with myself, Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto and Dr. Mark German together providing small incision cataract surgery, blade-free LASIK, glaucoma treatment, macular degeneration management, dry eye options, contact lens fitting, general eye care and more.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


WHAT’S UP WITH TODDLER TUESDAY? By Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
March 12, 2015

If you have visited our Mequon office on a Tuesday, you may have wondered about all the strollers and activity around the play table. We call it “Toddler Tuesday” as Dr. Deborah Costakos is here then. She is a fellowship trained pediatric ophthalmologist specializing in eye problems specific to children. The rest of the week, Dr. Costakos can be found in the many neonatal intensive care units (NICU’s) in the area and at Children’s Hospital.

Dr. Deborah Costakos

Children can have a number of serious eye conditions that, if not treated promptly, could result in lifelong vision problems.  The youngest patients she sees are only a few days old.  Those are the ones born early (before 32 weeks gestation) or who have a low birth weight (under 1500 grams or 3.3 pounds).  These tiny babies can develop a condition called “retinopathy of prematurity” or ROP. If Dr. Costakos sees abnormal blood vessels inside their eyes, she may need to intervene with lasers or other therapies to allow normal vision development.

Dr. Costakos also takes care of older children with wandering eyes. Sometimes these children are treated with a patch over one eye, glasses or even surgery to bring the eyes into alignment. Wandering eyes can happen with adults too, so sometimes they join the fun on Toddler Tuesday!  Patients with genetic eye problems, infantile cataracts, congenital eye tumors and more are also among her patients.

For more information about Dr. Costakos and pediatric eye care, call our office or visit our web site below.  Next week, look for an article about our newest addition, Dr. Neda Esmaili, who specializes in plastic surgery around the eyes!

For more  information on such topics as iLASIK, cataract surgery or pediatric eye care,  call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


THE DRESS!! By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
March 9, 2015

Unless you have been living in total isolation without access to newspapers, internet, magazines or television you probably have heard about “the dress”. This is a photo of a dress that has been widely circulated but appears different to different people. The whole thing started with a photo posting of a mother-of-the bride’s dress by a young women living on the Scottish Hebredian island of Colonsay. From there it took off to become an internet sensation. Some say the dress appears to be blue with a black fringe, others totally disagree and insist it is a white dress with a gold fringe.

Why such a fuss over a dress? How could someone from a tiny island across the Atlantic trigger this media frenzy? It is because how we perceive “the dress” explains a lot about how color perception works and how the viewer and their surroundings influence perception.

For context, if there is a white background around the photo, the dress appears to be blue. If there is a black background around the photo, the dress is perceived as white.  There are also differences in color perception between the sexes. Men have 25% more neurons in the vision part of the brain which affects their color perception. The result is a slight shift in how they perceive colors compared to women. Green grass appears slightly yellow to men and very green to women. A color that appears orange to a woman, appears more red to a man.

“The dress” is a bit of fun and a nice distraction from some of the other news of the day!

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. German is an optometrist offering comprehensive eye care for patients of all ages. He accepts most insurance plans. Along with his colleagues, Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals offers medical and surgical eye care including blade-free LASIK, small incision cataract surgery, glaucoma care, macular degeneration management, dry eye options, contact lens fitting and general eye examinations.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


DOES YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE AFFECT YOUR EYE PRESSURE? By Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
March 3, 2015

As far as your health is concerned, the two times you hear about “pressure” is with blood pressure and eye pressure. An abnormally high blood pressure could lead to heart disease or stokes. An abnormally high eye pressure could lead to vision loss from glaucoma.  A logical question is whether or not the two are directly related.

It turns out that the two are related. A 2005 article in the British Journal of Ophthalmology reported on the Beaver Dam study. This is a Wisconsin based long term study following thousands of people in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. The study looked at diastolic (the low number) blood pressure and systolic (the higher number) blood pressure and compared it to the patient’s eye pressure. The results found that for every 10 mm Hg increase in diastolic blood pressure, there was a corresponding 0.6 mm Hg increase in eye pressure. The effects of systolic blood pressure on eye pressure were less. For every 10 mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure, there was a 0.3 mm Hg increase in eye pressure.

Is this important? First and foremost you concern should be maintaining a healthy blood pressure. This is something for you and your primary care provider to determine. As for eye pressure, you would have to have a very significant elevation in blood pressure to cause significant vision damage from glaucoma but it could certainly happen.

This is just another reason to keep on top of your general health care as it can affect your eye pressure too. Other potential eye problems from uncontrolled blood pressure include small strokes behind the eye and broken or blocked blood vessels in the eye. Take care of yourself and make your eyes happy too!

Dr. Josephine-Liezl P. Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto is a board certified ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery, glaucoma care, macular degeneration management, dry eye options and more. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


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