Recent posts

ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT AND YOUR EYES By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
July 5, 2016

Our sun provides life giving light to our planet.  However, some of the radiation that the sun emits can potentially harm us.  Ultraviolet (UV) light is not visible to us, but can damage our skin and our eyes.  There are 3 types of UV radiation. UV-C is absorbed by the ozone layer of the earth, and does not pose any threat.  However, UV-A and UV-B can cause short and long term damage to our skin and eyes.  UV radiation can also be emitted by artificial sources such as tanning beds, lasers, and welding machines.

Exposure to excessive amounts of UV radiation without protection in a short time can cause a “sunburn” to the eye.  Welders know this as welders flash or burn of the eyes.  It causes a painful, red, tearing, and light sensitive eye lasting for several days.  Looking directly into the sun or artificial source of UV light without protection can cause permanent and irreversible damage to the retina inside the eye.  This can cause a permanent blind spot in your vision.  That is why we are taught from a young age to not stare into the sun.

Exposure to UV light prematurely ages the eyes.  UV exposure accelerates cataract growth, causes growths on the eye called pterygiums and pingueculas, is associated with macular degeneration, and cancer in or around the eye.

So, how can we protect our eyes from UV light?  Sunglasses!  It is important for all ages to be in the habit of wearing sunglasses even on cloudy days since clouds do not block UV radiation.  Even inexpensive sunglasses can block 100% of UV-A and UV-B from reaching the eyes.  Some contact lenses also block UV radiation.   We never think twice about wearing sunscreen to protect our skin so wear those sunglasses to protect your eyes.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He provides comprehensive eye care for patients of all ages and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


TIPS FOR HEALTHY EYES By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 27, 2016

There is a tendency to not really think about your eyes unless you have a problem such as pain or blurred vision. Most people, frankly, take better care of their car than their eyes! They take the car in for regular servicing for preventative maintenance and repair problems as they occur. Your eyes don’t ask much, just be treated kindly, and in return they provide you with a window into the world.

The most important gifts you can give your eyes are: wearing sunglasses outside, not smoking and having a healthy diet.  The sunglasses block the UVA and UVB radiation that can damage the retina and promote cataracts. Macular degeneration is a leading cause of vision loss for those over 65 years-old and there is a clear link between ultraviolet exposure and this condition. There are two types of macular degeneration, the dry and the wet. Smoking increases your chances of developing the more severe, wet type. A diet with plenty of leafy green vegetables is also helpful in preventing macular degeneration. These are lifetime habits that protect you most precious sense, your vision.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Just as your car needs servicing, your eyes need a thorough evaluation every one to two years. The purpose is not just to be sure you have the best possible glasses and contact lens prescription, it is also to be sure your eyes are healthy. Glaucoma is a leading cause of preventable vision loss and has no symptoms until it is quite severe. If detected early during an eye examination, preserving your vision is a simple as taking an eye drop daily.

SEE you soon!

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


SWIMMING AND CONTACT LENSES, OH NO! By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 24, 2016

You can’t see without your glasses so why not swim in your contact lenses?  The “why not” has to do with safety: swimming in contact lenses significantly increases your risk of developing eye problems that range from mild to quite severe. Most contact lenses are at least 50% water.  This means that chlorinated water penetrates your contacts and stays in on the surface of your eye for up to an hour after swimming.  The result is an irritation to the surface of your eye and an increased risk of infection.

While a mild eye irritation may go away in a day or so, a severe eye infection can result in permanent vision loss.  Even in the best maintained pool or spa, bacteria can be present.  In lake water, a severe pathogen called acanthamoeba may be present that causes a difficult to treat corneal ulcer.  This protozoa penetrates the cornea rapidly and often requires specially formulated eye drops to save the eye.  Beaches may also present the possibility of a fusarium fungal infection.

Those glasses may be bulky but they are your better choice over contacts in the water.  If you really want to see well in the water without glasses, however, it may be time to consider LASIK vision correction.  With LASIK you can free yourself of the hassles of glasses and still safely enjoy the outdoors.  LASIK is actually safer than contact lenses on dry land too!  As you know, our Dr. Martha Jay is a leader in blade-free LASIK vision correction.

LASIK screening exams are free, just give us a call. In the meantime, don’t wear those contacts in the water!

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


“DO I HAVE TO HAVE THOSE DILATING DROPS TODAY?” By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 10, 2016

When we prepare to put dilating drops in during a complete eye examination, we often hear “Not today, I have too much to do!”  The problem is that dilation is a major part of the eye examination.  Without it, you have only had the front part of your eyes examined.  Having an eye examination without dilating drops is like going to the gynecologist or primary care doctor without taking your clothes off!

We use the dilating drops to get a better view of the retina in the back of the eye and the blood vessels that overly it.  The eye is the only place in the body where we can directly see these tiny blood vessels which can be affected by high blood pressure, diabetes and many other medical conditions.  We are also looking for retinal tears or masses that cannot be seen through a small pupil.

Most people can go about their regular day after dilation if they have sunglasses.  The problem comes with reading but if you are already in bifocals, your reading should not be too impaired.  Most people are back to normal within 3-4 hours after the exam.

Dr. Mark E. GermanSo just plan ahead.  If you are scheduled for a complete eye examination and find it difficult to function with dilating drops, arrange your schedule accordingly.  As long as you are having your eyes examined, you might as well have us evaluate your whole eye and not just the front part. At lease we don’t make you take your clothes off!

Dr. Mark German is an optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He welcomes patients of all ages to his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


WHICH LAKESHORE EYE DOCTOR IS FOR YOU? By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 2, 2016

There are two types of eye doctors: Optometrists and Ophthalmologists.  Both do complete eye examinations, prescribe glasses and screen for eye diseases such as glaucoma or cataracts.  The difference is that an ophthalmologist is a medical doctor and a surgeon.  If you have an active medical or surgical eye problem, then you should schedule with our ophthalmologist, Dr. Martha Jay.

If you have already had cataract surgery, have stable macular degeneration, have well controlled diabetes, have mild glaucoma or especially if you have no medical/surgical eye problems at all, then one of our optometrist may be your better choice. Dr. Mark German and I are the optometrists at Lakeshore Eye Care. Both of us see patients in the Mequon and the Saukville offices. As I am new to the practice, it may be easier to schedule with me.

I have been practicing optometry for over 20 years.  In that time, I have seen just about every eye problem out there.  While I specialize in contact lens fitting and general eye examinations, I also do annual screenings for diabetic eye disease, macular degeneration, glaucoma and other medical eye problems.  I joined Lakeshore Eye Care this month.

So not everyone needs their annual eye examination done with an eye surgeon. Dr. Jay mainly concentrates on the care of patients before and after cataract surgery or LASIK vision correction. Other patients can be just as well taken care of with either myself or Dr. German.  See you soon!

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. Ivanoski is an optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care in both the Mequon & Saukville offices.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


NEW ARRIVAL AT COLUMBIA-ST. MARY’S: NEW OPERATING MICROSCOPE By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 26, 2016

It has arrived: A fabulous new operating microscope at Columbia-St. Mary’s Hospital in Mequon for eye surgery!  I started using the new Zeiss Lumera 700 microscope last month and could not be more pleased.  Now only does the eye appear clearer through the new microscope but the unit is fully integrated for ease of use.

The Lumera has a special lighting system that highlights every detail of the eye, kind of like going from a regular to a high definition view. It also has a wider depth of focusing so I can see different parts in the eye all at once without refocusing. The result is a safer procedure and a happier doctor, what’s not to like?

As if those key attributes were not enough, now we have a monitor in the room so the operating room staff can know how the surgery is proceeding. While all microscopes have a foot pedal controls the lighting and focusing, the one for Lumera has many other programmable functions to suite each individual doctor. All that and no annoying wires – it runs on Bluetooth.

Cataract surgery may be a quick procedure but it involves many small steps. When I can see better and don’t have to take the time to keep refocusing, I can concentrate of what matters: achieving the best possible outcome for my patients.

So thank you Columbia-St. Mary’s Hospital! We already have the best cataract machine there (the Alcon Centurion) and now the state-of-the art operating microscope. Their commitment to excellence in eye care is much appreciated.

For more information about cataract symptoms and surgical options, call for an appointment or visit our web site. It is not your grandmother’s procedure.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and LASIK vision correction.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


I’M THE NEW FACE AT LAKESHORE EYE CARE! By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 18, 2016

Let me take this opportunity to introduce myself: I’m Dr. Jim Ivanoski and I am very pleased announce that I will be joining the great staff at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals next month in May. While I will be new to Lakeshore Eye Care, I am certainly not new to optometry.  I have over 20 years of experience enhancing the vision of those in southeastern Wisconsin.  I am already scheduling patients in both the Mequon and Saukville office and look forward being part of this fabulous combined optometry/ophthalmology practice.

While I specialize in contact lens fitting, my emphasis is on comprehensive eye examinations to evaluate the health of the eyes and how that relates to the patient’s other medical conditions. You will find that I am a good listener and will work with you to be sure you not only can see as well as possible but that all your concerns about your vision and eyes have been addressed.

Where did I come from? I did my undergraduate studies at the University of Wisconsin at Parkside. I then went on to be a top student at the Illinois College of Optometry, graduating Magna Cum Laude. My wife and two children make our home in West Bend.  In my free time, look for me on the golf course or rooting for the Packers.

Enough about me, what is really my point is that I look forward to meeting you. Call today to schedule your comprehensive eye examination in either office. Should you require cataract surgery or have an interest in LASIK vision correction, our doctors at Lakeshore Eye Care can take care of you every step of the way.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 

 


DARK CIRCLES UNDER YOUR EYES? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 4, 2016

What’s that all about and what can you do about it? Those dark circles can have many sources from heredity, allergies, smoking or dehydration.  As for heredity, you cannot do much about that but the other sources can be remedied.

If you have allergies, treat them with over-the-counter medication or ask your doctor for stronger products if they are not doing the trick. Be sure you do not rub your eyes as that just makes the circles worse. You could even try the Nedi pot to clear your system of the annoying substances that are making you miserable. If you smoke, you probably realize the toll it takes on your skin. The tiny blood vessels that nourish your skin are deprived of oxygen so the elasticity goes down – just another reason to quit. Sun exposure is another culprit so be sure to wear hats and sunglasses.

The biggest preventable cause of dark circles under the eyes is dehydration. If you eat a salty meal the fluid is pulled from the skin around your eyes revealing the dark circles. Excessive alcohol does the same thing. That’s where the “rough night” comments come from. Not getting enough sleep can also contribute.

What can you do about it once those circles appear? Get hydrated for one. Cooling the area is another. You can use cold compresses (cucumbers, ice packs, cold spoons). What you use does not matter, it is the cool temperature. There are many products sold for this problem, use at your own risk and be sure they are safe to use around your eyes. You can also get improvement by sleeping on several pillows. Finally there is the use of concealer, just be sure not to rub it on too aggressively.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including blade-free LASIK vision correction and small incision cataract surgery.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


LET ME INTRODUCE YOU… By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 28, 2016

From what I hear from our patients, what really stands out about Lakeshore Eye Care is our amazing staff. Not a day goes by without someone commenting on how nice they are and how much they learned from them. From the first phone call, throughout your exams or surgeries and finally through the quagmire of insurance billing, they have you covered.  Our doctors could not possibly get by without them and are very pleased that they have made an impression on you also.

Some especially important individuals who help facilitate your care are our Certified Ophthalmic Assistants and Technicians (COAs/COTs).  They work under our doctor’s direction and supervision to gather the pertinent information we need at each and every examination. They listen to your concerns and condense that information so we can effectively address them.  You leave with solutions for better vision and eye comfort.  Not only that but you learn a lot about how your eyes work too!

How did the technicians learn all this?  All of our COAs/COTs have completed an intense independent study course with clinical training that lasts at least two years.  They then have to pass either the COA or the COT level examinations. Furthermore, they participate in Continuing Medical Education courses every year to build their knowledge and skills with new technologies and developments.  Advances in medical and surgical eye care are constantly occurring and our techs make sure that they never get left behind.

Thank you techs, we could not do our job without you! And thank you kind patients for taking the time to complement them and other staff members on jobs well done.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care.  She is proud to work with all our techs: Catherine, Jodi, Leah, Amy, Laura and Lisa.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


WHY DON’T OUR SURGEONS FIT CONTACT LENSES? By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 2, 2016

At Lakeshore Eye Care, we have two types of eye doctors: Ophthalmologists (Dr. Martha Jay) and Optometrists (myself).  While all three of us take care of your eyes, the ophthalmologists are surgeons. They concentrate on medical and surgical problems of the eyes such as cataract surgery, LASIK vision correction, glaucoma and other conditions. They rarely see patients who don’t have a medical or surgical problem with their eyes.

My practice, in contrast, is more skewed towards those with healthy eyes such as those who need their glasses or contact lenses checked. While an eye exam with me is just a thorough as with the ophthalmologists, I am more likely screening for eye problems rather than treating those with serious pathology.

So that comes to the big question: Why don’t the ophthalmologists fit contact lenses?  Contact lenses change all the time and I am the one who stays on top of these new developments. There are new contact lenses for dry eyes, astigmatism and reading introduced all the time. That leaves the ophthalmologists plenty of time to devote to staying on top of the advances in medical and surgical eye care.

The bottom line is that if you have healthy eyes and wear contact lenses, your best bet is to schedule with me so I can screen for more serious eye problems and provide you with the best contact lens options. Thinking of moving on to LASIK or have we decided that your cataracts are ready for surgery? Then that is another story and the ophthalmologists will take it from there.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages to his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


Stay Connected


We want to hear from you