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MIGRAINES CAN AFFECT YOUR VISION By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 8, 2017

You are having a rough day. All of a sudden your vision becomes blurred and you see moving zigzags in your side vision. They may be black and white, silver or in brilliant color. Over 30 minutes to an hour, the zigzags gradually move away and break up. Your vision returns to normal leaving you wondering what happened.

The above description is classic for a visual migraine. Visual migraines are similar to the aura people with migraine headaches experience but, lucky for you, no headache followed. Visual migraines are more common in people who had migraine headaches when they were younger or who have a family history of migraine headaches.

What should you do? First of all, if this is new for you a thorough eye examination is recommended to be sure of the diagnosis. Should the problem occur more than once, look for triggers that might bring them on and then try to avoid them. It could be stress, fatigue, bright lights, hormonal changes, red wine or certain foods.

Visual migraines leave no lasting defect in your vision. They are caused by spasms of blood vessels in the vision part of your brain, just like migraine headaches. There is generally no treatment as they quickly resolve. Should they occur so frequently that they interfere with your daily life, certain blood pressure medications can be prescribed by your primary care doctor.

Feel free to schedule an appointment should you have any concerns. The first time this happens it can be very frightening. We are here to help.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. Ivanoski is an Optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


How to Use Technology for Low Vision Help: New York Times Article

By user-admin
March 2, 2017

Click on the image to the left for a recent New York Times article by Jane Brody with tips about how new technologies can improve independence in those with vision impairment.


IT IS TIME TO GET YOUR EYES CHECKED FOR GLAUCOMA By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 28, 2017

Glaucoma is an eye condition that damages the optic nerve.  The optic nerve carries vision information collected by the eye to the brain.  If the optic nerve is damaged, vision loss occurs, and is irreversible.  Most types of glaucoma are characterized by high eye pressure that can damage the optic nerve.  Although there is no cure for glaucoma, vision loss can usually be slowed or halted with prescribed eye drops or surgery.

According to the Archives of Ophthalmology in 2004, it is estimated that over 3 million Americans have glaucoma, and only half of those know they have it.  Glaucoma can often times be virtually symptomless.  There is usually no pain associated with increased eye pressure.  Vision loss with glaucoma typically begins with peripheral or side vision, and significant amounts of vision can be lost before it is noticed.

Everyone is at risk for glaucoma.  The risk increases as we age.  People over age 60 are more at risk to develop glaucoma.  African Americans are more at risk to develop glaucoma than Caucasians.  Hispanic populations tend to have a higher risk to develop glaucoma as they age.  People of Asian descent are more at risk to develop angle closure glaucoma.  Other risk factors for developing glaucoma include:  certain medications like steroids, high nearsightedness, and thin corneas.

The best way to diagnose glaucoma is with a dilated eye examination.  A survey done by the Glaucoma Research Foundation found that less than half of all adults have a dilated eye examination every two years.  Glaucoma is a chronic lifelong condition that requires careful monitoring, and diagnosis is the first step in preserving vision.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. Ivanoski is an Optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 

 


WHAT'S THE WORSE THING THAT CAN HAPPEN? GOING BLIND, PEOPLE SAY - NEW YORK TIMES ARTICLE

By user-admin
February 22, 2017

Click on the photo to the left for Jane Brody's article about vision health from the New York Times, February, 2017.


SLEEP APNEA AND MACULAR DEGENERATION By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 20, 2017

While it has long been known that there is an association between smoking and “wet” macular degeneration, it now appears that there is also a link between sleep apnea and macular degeneration. Presumably the mechanism is the same: decreased oxygen reaching the delicate retinal tissues in the back of the eye. The result is blurred or distorted central vision.

The study was reported in the British Journal of Ophthalmology last month. They followed almost 70,000 patients who were hospitalized in England between 1999 and 2011. The two eye problems they looked at were glaucoma and macular degeneration. While they found no increased risk for developing glaucoma in those with sleep apnea, they did find a 44% increased risk for developing macular degeneration. The glaucoma finding is somewhat surprising as a previous study in Japan did find that sleep apnea was associated with glaucoma.

There is a tendency to think of each part of your body as independent but they all work in consort. For healthy eyes you also need well controlled blood pressure and blood sugars. A healthy heart and lungs are critical as well. Being overweight is a main risk factor for sleep apnea but this is also associated with diabetes and high blood pressure.

What to do? See your doctor regularly and follow their instructions. Eat a healthy diet with plenty of leafy green vegetables and cut back of meat and carbohydrates. Exercise regularly, watch your weight. Be sure you take your medications as directed. Hate that C-Pap machine for sleep apnea? Talk to your doctor about modifications in the mask or other ways to give you the good night’s sleep you deserve and your retina the full dose of oxygen it requires. More questions? We’re here to help.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK vision correction.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


TAKE CARE OF YOUR TEETH FOR BETTER EYE HEALTH By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 12, 2017

A recent study in the prestigious medical journal “Ophthalmology” showed a link between poor oral health and glaucoma. The study found that those who had lost a tooth in the last 2 years had a 45% increased risk for developing glaucoma. Even worse numbers were found for those who had lost a tooth in the last 2 years and still had active periodontal disease. Those in that group had an 85% increased risk for developing glaucoma.

What can explain this surprising finding? With poor oral health there is a decrease in the blood flow to the affected area which may also alter the blood flow the eyes, obviously located nearby. With treatment of periodontal disease the blood flow to the jaw area increases back to normal. Then presumably it also does so to the eyes. Treatment for periodontal disease has been shown to decrease glaucoma risk back to the normal incidence of 1% of the population.

Many patients are “doctor avoiders” and I suspect that those same people are also “dentist avoiders.” If this sounds like you or someone you know, bring this important study to their attention. We have long known that poor oral health is associated with heart disease, stroke, respiratory problems, dementia and diabetes. Now you can add eye health to the equation.

The type of glaucoma associated with periodontal disease is the more common “open angle” type which is generally treated with eye drops. It can only be diagnosed with a dilated eye examination. We need to measure your eye pressure and then get a good look at your optic nerve in the back of the eye. If either appear abnormal, then extra testing may be required. The key is early detection because once you lose vision from this condition we can only arrest the loss, not bring back what is gone.

For better health remember to brush, floss and visit both your dentist and eye doctor regularly!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and LASIK Vision Correction. She practices at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Drs. Mark German and James Ivanoski with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


A VERY THOROUGH EYE EXAMINATION By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 7, 2017

At Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals we perform a very thorough eye examination. Let’s walk through all of the testing that is done during a routine eye examination.

First, a very comprehensive health history is taken. This includes current vision concerns, eye pain or discomfort problems, current medical conditions, past eye injuries or problems, current medications, past eye or general surgeries, allergies, and a social history. This history helps us to customize our care to your specific needs.

The vision is carefully evaluated during the examination. Vision is checked for distance or reading problems. Color vision is evaluated. Peripheral vision is checked. A careful evaluation for need of glasses or contact lenses is performed (refraction).
Eye alignment is evaluated. We check to make sure the eyes are moving properly. The pupils are checked for abnormalities. These tests are done to make sure the nerves that control the eye muscles are working properly.

A very thorough eye health examination is performed. The eye is evaluated from the outside to the inside. The intraocular pressure is checked to evaluate for glaucoma. Eyelid mechanical function, tears and tear drainage, and the ocular surface are checked with a slit lamp biomicroscope. The lens is evaluated for cataracts. The optic nerve and retina are checked for problems like glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, or macular degeneration.

Finally, we discuss our findings and any treatment if necessary. Most people would agree that vision is the sense we value the most. Our expertly trained technicians and eye doctors look forward to helping to protect your sight.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. Ivanoski practices comprehensive optometry at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


YOUR LAST EYE EXAM WAS WHEN?? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
January 30, 2017

You probably see your primary care doctor at least every 1-2 years, you most likely visit the dentist every 6-12 months, even your car gets frequent servicing but what about your eyes? Many have the attitude that they do not need an eye examination unless they have blurred vision. Even then they may avoid us when they reach their 40’s and their ‘arms get too short” – they simply pick up a pair of “cheaters” at the drug store and go about their way.

What’s wrong with this picture? There is more to an eye exam than just checking to see if you need glasses. The big risk is glaucoma which is a leading cause of blindness and vision loss. Unfortunately glaucoma has no symptoms until you have lost about 40% of your vision. Treatment can then start but only to arrest the vision loss, not to bring back what has been lost. Just in the last few months I have seen two patients with significant vision loss from glaucoma – both had neglected having regular eye care for a number of years.

Those who have had refractive surgery like LASIK are particularly at risk. This is because their eye pressure appears lower than it really is due to the thinning of the cornea from LASIK. We measure eye pressure by pushing on the eye with a tiny device, if the cornea is thin then the eye pressure appears lower than it really is. They only way to adequately evaluate a patient for glaucoma is with a comprehensive dilated eye exam by a trained professional.

Our three doctors in both our Ozaukee County locations are here to help. Call today if you have been neglecting your eyes. Also spread the word to family and friends as they may not be aware of the importance of regular eye care. Realize that glaucoma is generally treated with just eye drops once the diagnosis is made and early detection is the key to preserving your vision into the future. See you soon!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) practicing with Drs. Mark German & James Ivanoski at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.
For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


PRE-ECLAMPSIA RELATED TO RETINAL DETACHMENTS LATER IN LIFE

By user-admin
January 11, 2017

Click on the image to the left for a link to a New York Times articles reporting on a recent study linking pre-eclampsia during pregnancy to eye problems, such as retinal detachments, and other medical problems later in life.


WINTER IS LASIK SEASON By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
January 10, 2017

January in Wisconsin leaves us dreaming of our favorite summer activities that seem so far away: enjoying our lakes and pools, blasting out on that Harley, biking the Interurban trail and much more. While you cannot make winter disappear, there is something you can do now to enhance your summer fun – improve your outlook on life with LASIK Vision Correction! Winter is always our busiest time for LASIK because this is a procedure for active people, not couch potatoes. Most prefer to take advantage of this down time to finally get free of their contacts and glasses.

We have been using our new Wavelight blade-free LASIK laser system for a little over a year now and have been very impressed with the results. The lasers are not just faster than prior technology, they are also more precise. The improvement in vision, especially for those with more extreme prescriptions, is even better than before. They also open up LASIK to many who may not have been candidates in the past because they can treat the widest range of prescriptions of any laser available.
Patients love the improved comfort and potential to see even better than they did with glasses or contacts. I appreciate the precise automation with the smallest laser spot size in the industry and fastest eye tracking system available: 20 times faster than natural eye movements!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Don’t just dream of summer, have LASIK now so when it does arrive you will be ready to fully embrace it. Get started by calling for your complementary LASIK screening exam today to determine if LASIK is for you.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified Eye Physician and Surgeon specializing in LASIK Vision Correction and small incision cataract surgery.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


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