Recent posts

11 Impossibly Cool Facts You May Not Know About Your Vision from Buzzfeed

By editor
June 1, 2015

Click below:

http://www.buzzfeed.com/acuvue/impossibly-cool-facts-you-may-not-know-about-yo?bfsms=1&utm_term=.cyYgaNZMP


BASEBALL VS FOOTBALL EYES By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
May 13, 2015

Are your eyes more like a football or a baseball?

Been following the Brewers? Baseball is not just a sport but also a way to explain the shape of your eyes.  You have “football eyes” if the front of your eyes are curved like a football. This is called astigmatism.  You have “baseball eyes” if the front of your eyes are more rounded like a baseball.

It is important to know if you have “football” or “baseball” eyes if you are considering cataract surgery.  The differences between the two determine which implant options are available to you at the time of surgery.  Cataract surgery is a very safe and relatively easy procedure to go through.  We gently remove your natural cloudy lens and replace it with a clear implant to improve your vision.

The latest advancements in cataract surgery allow us to take advantage of more implant choices than previously available. If you have football eyes, you would see better afterwards if we place a Toric implant at the time of your cataract surgery.  If you have baseball eyes, then you could benefit from a Multi-focal implant that allows you to see far away, intermediate and close up after your surgery without glasses.  These bifocal-like implants let you turn back the clock and be relatively free of glasses after your procedure.

How can you tell if you have football or baseball eyes?  How do you know which implant is optimal for you at the time of your cataract surgery?  We guide you through the options available to you during your cataract evaluation.  Remember, you only have cataract surgery once so it is important to consider all the possibilities to optimize your vision.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


LASIK OR CONTACTS: WHICH IS SAFER? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
April 16, 2015

If you don’t like glasses, your alternatives include contact lenses or LASIK vision correction. We know that LASIK is more convenient and saves you money in the long run but which is the safer alternative? You’ll be surprised to learn that that actually LASIK is safer than wearing contact lenses. As a comprehensive ophthalmologist, I treat all types of eye problems. It is much more common for a contact lens wearer to come in with a severe eye problem than someone who has had LASIK.

Up to 6% of contact lens wearers per year experience a severe eye infection, worsening dry eye symptoms or even an allergy to contact lenses themselves. These and other problems are not only painful but can lead to permanent vision loss and an inability to resume contact use or have LASIK in the future.

As LASIK safety is not the same everywhere you go, select your LASIK surgeon carefully.  All my patients benefit from blade-free LASIK using two lasers instead of one.  It is almost impossible to have a complication during this type of LASIK procedure. That’s why we call it “LASIK for Chickens.”

If you have been thinking about LASIK, consider your odds of a problem if you stay in contacts. You knew that LASIK simplifies your life and is more cost effective; now add safety to the list favoring LASIK.  Give us 20 minutes and we can turn those contacts into a distant memory.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

While taking the blade out of the LASIK equation allows more patients to be good candidates, there still are exceptions. To see if LASIK is an option for you, call for your personalized screening exam.  It’s complimentary and pressure-free.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including blade-free LASIK, small incision cataract surgery with premium bifocal and astigmatism implants, glaucoma care, macular degeneration management, dry eye therapies and more. She practices with Dr. Mark German at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.  Patients of all ages are welcome and most insurance plans accepted.

For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.

 


ARMS TOO SHORT? By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
April 10, 2015

It is not uncommon for friends and neighbors to stop me at social events, after work or even while running errands and ask the same question: “What can I do to read now that I’m in my 40’s?” Almost everyone goes through this frustrating change of not being able to see close-up and far-away with the same pair of glasses around this time in their lives. This nuisance is caused by a degeneration of the proteins of the lens (located behind your pupil) causing it to harden over time. The tiny muscles that have served you so well for focusing since childhood cannot overcome this new challenge.

So what can you do about it? It’s all about trade-offs to find what works best for you. The options include glasses, contact lenses, LASIK or even cataract surgery. As for glasses, you can get one pair for distance and one for near or combine the two in a bifocal. Some patients are lucky enough to be able to see close up by just taking their glasses off.

As for contact lens options, there are bifocal contacts, monovision contacts (using one eye for near and the other for distance) or you can wear reading glasses over the contacts. If you like monovision, then you can replicate that with LASIK and avoid the hassles of contacts. Although monovision may seem like an odd alternative, don’t dismiss it too quickly as many patients do wonderfully with this option.

If you are ready for cataract surgery, there are bifocal implants that can help you eliminate the glasses altogether. You can even have those special premium implants without having cataracts but the upcharge is more. We can find which of the many options are best for you at your next exam.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German practices with Dr. Martha Jay at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He specialized in hard-to-fit contact lens wearers and general eye care.  Together, the three doctors offer comprehensive medical and surgical eye care including blade-free LASIK, small incision cataract surgery, dry eye therapies, macular degeneration management, contact lens fitting and more.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


LOOKING FOR A LIFT? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
March 23, 2015

Dr. Neda Esmaili

Are you beginning to look a little like your parents with drooping eyelids? Do people ask you if you are tired or had a rough night when you are well rested? It might be time to consider doing something to bring your appearance back to where you would like it to be. We have just the answer for you in our newest doctor, Neda Esmaili. She is a fellowship trained oculoplastics surgeon. That means that she is an ophthalmologist, just like myself, who has then completed a 2 year fellowship in eye plastic surgery.

Dr. Esmaili is seeing patients in our Mequon office one day per week. The rest of the time she can be found at the Eye Institute where she recently joined the faculty. She offers a full range of possibilities for looking your best including non-surgical options such as botox and fillers.  She also takes care of more serious problems such as tumors around the eyes or eyelids, thyroid related issues such as double vision or prominent eyes, eyelids that turn in or turn out, blocked tear ducts and more.

We are very pleased to welcome Dr. Esmaili to our practice. She and Dr. Deborah Costakos, our pediatric ophthalmologist, are providing a much needed presence on this side of town for those seeking specialized medical and surgical eye care. They round out our eye care offerings with myself and Dr. Mark German together providing small incision cataract surgery, blade-free LASIK, glaucoma treatment, macular degeneration management, dry eye options, contact lens fitting, general eye care and more.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


THE DRESS!! By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
March 9, 2015

Unless you have been living in total isolation without access to newspapers, internet, magazines or television you probably have heard about “the dress”. This is a photo of a dress that has been widely circulated but appears different to different people. The whole thing started with a photo posting of a mother-of-the bride’s dress by a young women living on the Scottish Hebredian island of Colonsay. From there it took off to become an internet sensation. Some say the dress appears to be blue with a black fringe, others totally disagree and insist it is a white dress with a gold fringe.

Why such a fuss over a dress? How could someone from a tiny island across the Atlantic trigger this media frenzy? It is because how we perceive “the dress” explains a lot about how color perception works and how the viewer and their surroundings influence perception.

For context, if there is a white background around the photo, the dress appears to be blue. If there is a black background around the photo, the dress is perceived as white.  There are also differences in color perception between the sexes. Men have 25% more neurons in the vision part of the brain which affects their color perception. The result is a slight shift in how they perceive colors compared to women. Green grass appears slightly yellow to men and very green to women. A color that appears orange to a woman, appears more red to a man.

“The dress” is a bit of fun and a nice distraction from some of the other news of the day!

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. German is an optometrist offering comprehensive eye care for patients of all ages. He accepts most insurance plans. Along with his colleagues, Dr. Martha Jay, Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals offers medical and surgical eye care including blade-free LASIK, small incision cataract surgery, glaucoma care, macular degeneration management, dry eye options, contact lens fitting and general eye examinations.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


PUNXSUTAWNEY PHIL SAY IT ISN’T SO! By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
February 18, 2015

The famous groundhog “Punxsutawney Phil” and our own Milwaukee Zoo counterpart “Wynter” both agree: six more weeks of winter. Instead of just bundling up and enduring while you wait for warmer weather, why not spend your winter wisely by having LASIK vision correction to enhance your summer fun?

To set your mind at ease about LASIK, start by selecting an experienced local doctor you can trust. Did you know that I was the very first doctor in the Milwaukee area to perform laser refractive surgery? Then be sure you doctor is using the most advanced precision laser technology available.  We do just that by exclusively offering blade-free LASIK with the IntraLase and VISX lasers. Affordability should not be your top concern but contacts are expensive.  If you are a 30 year-old contact lens wearer, expect to pay $20,000 over your lifetime for contacts and solutions.  With those savings and our financing plan, LASIK is a deal.

Blade-free LASIK in my hands is safe, reliable and pain free. You are in the laser suite for only about 20 minutes with each laser running for a minute or less.  I suggest that you take two days off your regular activities.  After LASIK other restrictions include no contact sports, eye makeup or swimming for 2 weeks and no vigorous eye rubbing for 6 weeks. You can drive the next day as your vision will be remarkably improved but complete healing takes about 3 months.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Don’t let a couple of groundhogs ruin your day, get prepared for summer by calling 262-241-1919 today to arrange your complimentary LASIK screening exam.  You’ll enjoy swimming, biking, boating and all your other summer passions so much more without the hassles of contacts or glasses.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


THE WHAT AND WHY OF A “CCD” By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
February 14, 2015

If you have been to our office recently, you were probably given information about expecting an email requesting that you to sign onto our secure network. The purpose of this is to view a summary of your examination called a Continuity of Care Document (CCD). Why are we asking you to do this? The reason is to help in the development of our electronic records system.

Almost every health care provider has been making the transition from paper records to using a computer. Electronic medical records provide a more efficient form of care in that they are easier to read, easier to compare changes over time and easier to share with other providers. Medicare recognizes these advantages and has provided a financial incentive to offset the considerable expense of the conversion for doctors and clinics.  They don’t just hand out the money, however. They require that we comply with something called “Meaningful Use.”

One of these Meaningful Use requirements is that we establish a way for patients to have access a brief summary of their visit. That is the purpose of the CCD. All the computer companies, including ours, have been struggling to make this system work efficiently. By signing onto our system you are helping us test and perfect this first stage of the CCD. We realize that it takes a few minutes of your time but really appreciate your assistance in this important investment in the future of electronic medicine.

Dr. Mark E. GermanNow that you know the “What and the Why of a CCD”, don’t forget to respond to our email asking you to click on the MySecureData link to test our system. Remember that in order for your efforts to count, at the end where you must click on “Send a Message” so we know that you have successfully entered the portal. THANK YOU!!

Dr. Mark German is an optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Dr. Martha Jay. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


GLAUCOMA AWARENESS MONTH by Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
January 11, 2015

Eye ChartJanuary is National Glaucoma Awareness Month. The purpose of these various medical awareness months is to increase the public’s understanding of serious medical conditions. While many have heard of glaucoma, most really don’t know what it is, how it is diagnosed and what treatment options are available.

Glaucoma is an eye condition caused by damage to the optic nerve in the back of the eye.  It is often but not always associated with increased eye pressure.  The optic nerve is like a cable, carrying visual information from the eye to the brain.  If it is damaged, permanent vision loss may occur.  Unfortunately, glaucoma has no symptoms until up to 40% of the side or peripheral vision has been lost.

Over 2.2 million Americans have glaucoma but unfortunately up to 50% of them are unaware of it. Glaucoma is a leading cause of preventable blindness which is why early diagnosis is so important. It is most commonly treated with eye drops but more severe cases may require lasers or surgery. Glaucoma risks include: increased age, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, or a family member with the disease.

How is it diagnosed?  As there are no symptoms, the key to diagnosis is to have regular eye examinations with dilating drops at least every one to two years.  The reason dilation is so important is that it allows us to look at the optic nerve in the back of the eye. If the eye pressure is elevated or optic nerves are abnormal, extra testing is done to evaluate side vision and the health of the optic nerves.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDon't become a statistic! Call for your complete eye examination today.

Dr. Mark German practices comprehensive optometry at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Dr. Martha Jay. For more eye care information call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


WHEN IS A VISUAL HALLUCINATION NOT A CAUSE FOR ALARM? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
January 5, 2015

I once had a patient state very calmly that there was an army in her backyard filming a movie. Her family was quite concerned and worried that she was developing dementia or a serious mental illness. Fortunately neither was the case.  These “hallucinations” were caused by a condition called the Charles Bonnet Syndrome.

This syndrome occurs in those with limited vision.  In my experience, it is generally seen in patients with severe macular degeneration. Macular degeneration is the leading cause of legal blindness for people over 65, but only 10-40% of those with severe vision loss experience the syndrome. Charles Bonnet was a Swiss philosopher who first described these visual hallucinations in 1760 after observing his grandfather who was going blind from cataracts.

The mechanism is thought to be due to the brain filling in for the reduced visual input from the eye. The episodes can last from seconds to minutes, occur rarely or be more frequent. Usually about 18 months after the onset they just gradually disappear. The most common type of hallucination involves faces of people but animals or plants may also be seen. The images appear smaller than in real life.  Another hallmark is that vision is the only sense involved so there are no associated abnormal sounds or smells.

What to do if you yourself or a family member are experiencing this syndrome? First be sure to have a thorough eye examination to see if there are any treatment options for the vision loss. If none are available, then reassurance from family and friends about what is real and what is not is helpful for the patient involved.  As with the patient who “saw” the army in her backyard, the images rarely concern the patient but are worrisome to their family members.  Hopefully the above explanation will set all involved at ease.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including blade-free iLASIK and small incision cataract surgery with premium lens implants.

For more eye care informati0n, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


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