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YOUR DOCTOR vs ICD-10! By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with 2 Ozaukee County, Wisconsin Offices (close to Mequon, Fox Point, Cedarburg, Grafton, Saukville and more)

By editor
October 6, 2015

Have you been to see a doctor since the first of October? Did they seem a bit distracted? It could be due to the new coding system for documenting your various medical problems called ICD-10. It stands for the “International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Edition” and, after two year-long delays, was finally implemented on October 1st. The previous system, called ICD-9, was in use since 1979 in the U.S. but the rest of the world moved on to ICD-10 starting in the 1990’s.
Why is it such a big deal? The new coding system is much more specific. For example there is a different code for the left and right for many conditions, which generally makes sense. This can be cumbersome, however, for problems that affect both the right and left sides such as blepharitis. This very common low grade eyelid infection almost always affects both eyes and both the upper and lower eyelids. With ICD-9, only one code was required but with ICD-10 you have to list 4 separate codes to be completely accurate. ICD-9 had 13,000 separate codes and ICD-10 has 68,000.
At Lakeshore Eye Care we have been dreading October 1st like it was the apocalypse. But guess what? It was no big deal because we had converted to electronic medical records in 2011. Our software company and our staff had made the best of the delays over the last two years so we were all ready for the transition. The new system is more specific and accurate, allowing health care trends to be tracked and public safety improved.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Change is sometimes difficult - at least this time thinking about it was worse than the actual implementation!

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


Milwaukee based Podcast about "Living Blind" not just for the Blind

By editor
September 22, 2015

Click here for a link to a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel article about a local Podcast concerning "Living Blind" that's not just of interest to those with a vision impairment.


“CAN I BEND OVER AFTER CATARACT SURGERY?” By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with 2 offices in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin (close to Cedarburg, Grafton, Fox Point, River Hills and other North Shore Communities)

By editor
September 22, 2015

This has got to be the most common question I hear from cataract patients. Their sister, neighbor or friend at church told them, “Be sure you don’t bend over after your cataract surgery.”  We give out specific written instructions after cataract surgery that NEVER mention not bending over but this question persists. Where did it come from and why won’t it go away?

The where it came from is easy: in the past (more than 20 years ago) cataract surgery involved making a very large incision that was almost 180 degrees across the top of the eye. While there are some surgeons who have STILL not adapted the newer techniques, 99% make a very small incision (only 2.4 mm in my case).  When the incision was much larger, bending over during the healing process put stress on that large incision and the many sutures required to close it.

Modern cataract surgery is done without stitches, patches or shots. That means that the restrictions after surgery are different too. We only have 4 rules (besides what you do with the eye drops) for the first two weeks after cataract surgery: 1) no pushing on the eye, 2) no eye makeup, 3) no swimming and 4) do wear a plastic shield over the eye at night.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

This only applies to my patients. Be sure if you have surgery with another ophthalmologist that you follow their instructions. That follows for any type of medical procedure, the instructions are intended help you have the best possible outcome. Help me make this myth go away, be sure to read your post-operative instructions but don’t read too much into them!

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery.


DON'T SLEEP IN YOUR CONTACTS! By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices easily accessible to Cedarburg, Grafton and other Ozaukee County Communities

By editor
September 16, 2015

See the link below to find out how sleeping in contact lenses led to disastrous consequences for one patient:

DON'T SLEEP IN CONTACTS!


WHEN TOO THIN IS A PROBLEM: KERATOCONUS IN THE EYE By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist serving Cedarburg, Grafton and other Ozaukee County Communities in Wisconsin

By editor
September 14, 2015

Don't think you can ever be too thin? Think again when it comes to the cornea, the clear front part of your eye. Keratoconus (ker’ a toe koe nus) is a condition that causes a thinning of the cornea.  This allows the cornea to push out in a ‘cone’ shape. As a result, vision is distorted. Keratoconus generally affects both eyes, although it usually develops first in one eye.  The symptoms of blurred vision normally start between the ages of 16 to 25 years-old.  Patients may report that their eyes itch, that they often rub their eyes, or complain of eye strain. They may "squint" in order to improve their vision, experience light sensitivity, see halos around lights or even double images.

To correct the vision problems caused by keratoconus in its early stages, soft contact lenses or even eyeglasses may be successful.  If the condition progresses, rigid gas permeable contact lenses may be needed to provide the best possible vision by smoothing the front of the eye.  An eye doctor uses several instruments to identify those patients with keratoconus. The newest instrumentation for this purpose is a corneal topographer.   This device provides a computerized map of the cornea, much like a topographic hiking map, and can be used to definitively diagnose keratoconus. Patients with severe keratoconus, may not see adequately even with gas permeable contact lenses.  They then may benefit from a corneal transplant which replaces their cornea with healthy donor tissue.

Call us to schedule an eye exam that includes screening for keratoconus.  We use the latest diagnostic methods to examine the internal and external parts of the eyes, screen for vision diseases, and provide a complete range of eye surgeries.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an optometrist with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin (easily accessible from Cedarburg, Grafton and other Ozaukee County communities). For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


Predator or Prey? Pupils are Again Revealing!

By editor
August 31, 2015

Click here for a link to a New York Times article about how pupil shape may be related to whether you are a predator or the prey!

 

 

 


DR. JAY – TOP DOCTORS LIST MILWAUKEE MAGAZINE! By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
July 30, 2015

You knew that Dr. Martha Jay was a great doctor, now the annual Milwaukee Magazine “Top Doctors” list agrees. Check out the August issue for primary care doctors and specialists in the Milwaukee area who were selected for this honor.  Our patients often comment that it seems like everyone they know has had eye surgery with Dr. Jay and is thrilled with the results.  If you are ready for cataract surgery or are interested in having LASIK vision correction, call her for an evaluation to see what she can do to improve your outlook on life.

Cataract surgery may seem easy as it only takes 10-15 minutes and is pain free but there is considerable skill involved. Dr. Jay likes to say that surgery is like sailing (another of her passions) in that you learn something every time you go out. You want all that experience when you are considering a surgeon for your cataract surgery.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Jay also has considerable experience in LASIK vision correction, being the first doctor in the Milwaukee area to use a laser for refractive surgery. She exclusively offers blade-free LASIK using two lasers instead of one. This makes LASIK much safer and considerably more comfortable. There is still time this summer to have LASIK done, all you need to do is call for a free consultation to see if the procedure is right for you.

All the doctors at Lakeshore Eye Care are proud of Dr. Jay. Our team includes myself,  Dr. Deborah Costakos and Dr. Neda Esmaili.  Between the five of us we cover all age groups and all aspects eye care from general examinations and contact lenses to most types of eye surgery. Visit our web site or call for more details.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is a Optometrist specializing in general eye care including contact lens fitting. He welcomes patient off all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


UNIDENTIFIED FLOATING OBJECTS IN YOUR VISION? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
July 13, 2015

Do you have little spots moving around in your vision?  They are probably "floaters" or, in the medical term, vitreous opacities.  While floaters are usually only an annoyance, a change in their appearance could be caused by a retinal tear or even a retinal detachment.  Both need immediate attention.

The eye is filled with a gelatin-like material called vitreous.  Over time, it breaks down - becoming more liquid with small collagen particles casting a shadow on the retina.  The result is the appearance of small spots, squiggly lines, clouds or spider webs moving across your vision.  Flashes of light occur when the fluid shifts within the eye, tugging on the retina (the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye). The combination of flashes of light and/or a dramatic increase in floaters could indicate that the retina is tearing and in danger of detaching. Because a retinal detachment can result in blindness, treatment must be sought immediately.

The bottom line is that an occasional floater is not a problem.  But if you should see an abrupt increase in floaters, flashing lights or a loss of part of your vision in one eye, you need to be evaluated by an eye care professional within 24-48 hours to rule-out a retinal detachment.

Are you having an eye problem or are you due for a comprehensive eye examination? Then give us a call.  You can be assured that we provide the latest in medical and surgical eye care.  We welcome patients of all ages and accept most insurance plans.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


EYE SMART TIPS: SAFETY ON THE FOURTH, PART TWO!

By editor
June 29, 2015

Find more information about 4th of July eye safety at the link below from the Academy of Ophthalmology:

EYE SMART TIPS: SAFETY ON THE FOURTH OF JULY


EYE SAFETY & THE FOURTH By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
June 22, 2015

The best season of the year is fast approaching: fireworks season!  Wisconsinites can look forward to local city and town celebrations, larger ones on Milwaukee’s lakefront and even some very small family displays.  However, it is important to take eye safety into consideration amidst all the “oohs and aahs” this summer.

Some tips for avoiding injury are obvious-don’t point the fireworks towards anyone, don’t let small children handle them and be sure to read the instructions carefully.  Surprisingly our most common 4th of July injury does not come from improper handling of fireworks but from flying cinders.  These types of burns can happen at large, professionally run shows as well as the small do-it-yourself variety.

Should you or someone in your family have such a problem, first rinse the eye thoroughly with water or artificial tears.  If there is a change in vision or continued pain, a visit to an emergency room or with your eye care professional may be indicated.

Most cinder injuries are minor, in that they heal up without lasting damage, but they can be quite painful for hours.  The key to rapid healing is to be sure no particles are left in the eye and to keep the eye lubricated with tear drops.  If there is an actual burn, antibiotic eye drops or ointment are sometimes necessary.  These would have to be prescribed by an eye care professional or an emergency room physician.

At Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals we are equipped to triage and treat many of these accidental summertime injuries, although we hope you don’t need our services this 4th of July season! Stay safe and happy celebrating!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including blade-free LASIK vision correction and small incision cataract surgery with premium lens implants. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


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