Recent posts

GIANT PAPILLARY CONJUNCTIVITIS (GPC) By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
September 16, 2013

While it sounds like quite a mouthful, giant papillary conjunctivits (GPC) is a common eye condition. It's actually an allergy to contact lenses. It generally occurs in patients who have worn contact lenses for years. They come in concerned that their contacts are no longer comfortable and that they have a slight discharge from their eyes. "But I've worn contacts for years without problems" is their response when told of the diagnosis. It's precisely that long duration of wear that triggers the condition.

Patients with asthma, hay fever or animal allergies may be at greater risk of developing GPC. This condition is believed to be a reaction to protein deposits building up on the contact lenses. The name comes from what we see when we flip the upper eyelid: 1-2 mm bumps called "giant papillae".

The key to treatment is decreased lens wear time, frequent replacement of the contacts and diligent cleaning of the lenses each day. Disposable contacts help because they are discarded before the protein builds up. Sleeping in contacts has to stop. Besides the above, treatments may include allergy drops or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drops. Once the GPC clears up, the patient may want to consider LASIK vision correction to avoid a recurrence.

Are you having problems with your contact lenses? Or are you due for a thorough eye examination? We are here to help.

Dr. Mark E. German Dr. Mark German in an Optometrist practicing with Drs. Martha Jay and Josephine-Liezl Cueto at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin. This eye care team offers comprehensive eye care for all ages including contact lens fitting, LASIK vision correction, Cataract surgery, Glaucoma care, Age-related Macular degeneration care, Dry eye options, general eye care and much more.

To find out more about eye care and Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


FLEX PLANS AND LASIK By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
September 10, 2013

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Another summer spent annoyed with the hassles of contacts and glasses? Considering LASIK Vision Correction but not sure how to budget for it? Then don’t overlook the savings offered by Flexible Spending or Health Savings Accounts. While not part of all benefit packages, many employers do provide this option to utilize pre-tax income for medical procedures including LASIK. The rules vary but most plans require a fall commitment for the following year. Check with your Human Resources Officer to determine your specific deadlines.

Even if you cannot use one of these plans, you actually save money on LASIK compared with what you spend on contacts and glasses. On our web site there is a multiplier where you can put in your age and the type of contacts you wear to estimate your expected lifetime expenses. For example, if you are 30 years-old and wear 2 week disposable contacts you can expect to spend $21,900 over the rest of your life on contacts, glasses and solutions!

Most, but not all people are good candidates for blade-free LASIK. So be sure to see us for a LASIK screening exam prior to committing Flex funds for next year. This complimentary evaluation involves critical measurements of your vision and your eyes to see if you can benefit from this remarkable procedure. You’ll learn a lot about LASIK and have a chance to get acquainted with our great team at Lakeshore Eye Care.

Call for your screening exam today to start 2014 seeing better and saving money!

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist who as been at the forefront of LASIK vision correction in the Milwaukee area since the RK days. She was in fact the first ophthalmologist in Milwaukee to use a laser for refractive surgery and has consistently offered the most advanced refractive surgery options available anywhere, right here in southeastern Wisconsin.   She exclusively offers blade-free iLASIK, the safest and most precise LASIK procedure available. Call for a screening exam and you will be impressed with the professionalism of the staff at Lakeshore Eye Care and Dr. Jay.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


DOES MULTI-TASKING WORK? By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
August 27, 2013

While multi-tasking may not seem to be directly related to your vision, we are addressing the topic as the new school year begins because it relates to how effectively we learn. Nowadays multi-tasking seems like an inescapable part of life-but is it really possible to watch a movie, read a textbook and text your friends all while preparing for that exam tomorrow? A new study indicates that this is not only an ineffective way to learn but it also results in a misperception about your retention abilities.

In this study, college students were asked to memorize and perform math problems while multi-tasking. The participants were questioned about their usage frequency of 12 forms of media and also had their impulsivity and sensation seeking tendencies evaluated with standardized psychological testing.

Surprisingly, the students who reported the highest frequency of multi-tasking in their daily lives declared themselves to be better multi-taskers than what was actually measured. They thought they were learning more than they actually were. This group also scored higher on the impulsivity and sensation seeking evaluations with the psychological testing.

Dr. Mark E. GermanWhat’s the bottom line? Our lives are full of more and more distractions, many of them from electronic media. In order to retain new information we need to limit those distractions to allow our attention to focus on the task at hand. Studying is more effective and driving safer if the cell phone is silenced!

Dr. Mark German is an optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He accepts most insurance plans, including Medicare Assignments. Patients of all ages welcomed.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


YOU NEED CONTACT LENSES AND GLASSES by Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
July 17, 2013

You don’t need to have glasses if you wear contact lenses, right? WRONG! Actually, it isn’t healthy for your eyes to wear contacts from the time you wake up until the time you go to sleep every day. In order to fight off infection, your cornea (the clear front part of your eye) needs the extra oxygen exposure it can only get when you aren’t wearing your contact lenses. Not only is this a good reason to have a pair of glasses on hand, but also in the event of a complication such as a severe eye infection. When you have such a serious eye problem, you absolutely cannot wear contact lenses while you recover. Therefore, if you have no back-up glasses you have no way to see while you wait for the problem to improve.

The glasses prescription does not have to be perfect but should be close enough so you can see while driving and at work or school. Trying to determine your glasses prescription once a severe eye problem has occurred is difficult because your vision is blurred. Furthermore, you are then confronted with the problem of getting your glasses made in a hurry.

So if you cannot find your old glasses, next time you have an eye examination be sure to ask for a glasses prescription - even if you prefer to wear contact lenses. Simply put, it is just part of good eye care and you will certainly be glad you did so in the event of an eye problem. Other keys to healthy contact lens usage include making sure the contact lens case is very clean, not sleeping in the contacts, discarding the contacts as directed, and having a complete eye examination every 1-2 years.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin. For more eye care information call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


TOO BUSY FOR LASIK? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
July 9, 2013

Life is hectic, we get that. But if you are thinking that you are too busy to have LASIK vision correction, think again. Maybe you are too busy NOT to have LASIK! This painless procedure takes less than 20 minutes from start to finish. That’s less time than you spend dealing with your contact lenses in a single week.

Although you are in the laser suite for a total of 20 minutes, each laser runs for just a fraction of that time. In fact, the first laser takes just 21 seconds per eye. That’s all the time it needs to place tiny air bubbles just under the surface of your eye creating a small corneal cap. A second laser then changes the shape of the eye in about 30 to 45 seconds per eye. The result is great vision without glasses or contacts.

Following your quick procedure, you are sent home for a nice nap and awaken that same day to greatly improved vision. The very next morning you are greeted with an even better view on life. We recommend that you take both the day of the procedure and the day after the procedure off from work and your regular activities. Generally most people see pretty well that next day so it becomes a free day, allowing you time to enjoy your new vision.

Let us help simplify your life with LASIK vision correction. To get started, call for your complimentary screening exam to see if this remarkable procedure is an option for you. We get to know you and your eyes; and take the time to explain that LASIK is not the same everywhere you go. You only want to have the procedure once so choose wisely. Select a local doctor you can trust and one who uses the most precise, current and safest LASIK technology available.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay trained at Northwestern University in Chicago and has been providing the latest in medical and surgical eye care in the Milwaukee area since.  For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


BABY YOUR EYES By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
June 24, 2013

I frequently recommend cleaning the eyelids with dilute baby shampoo. When I bring this up with patients, I often get a quizzical look from them. Baby shampoo for adults? It works well around the eyes because of the “no-tears” feature. You don’t get the stinging in your eyes like with regular soap.

Why would I recommend baby shampoo? The main reason is for blepharitis. This is a very common chronic low-grade eyelid infection. The symptoms include red eyes in the morning, excessive tearing early in the day, a slight discharge and/or a gravely feeling in the eyes.

The baby shampoo decreases the bacterium from around your eyes. There are many small openings into the eyelid around the eyes that can easily become infected by common bacteria that exists elsewhere on your skin. Baby shampoo also helps decrease eye allergy symptoms by removing pollen or other irritants from contact with your eyes.

What you do is dilute the shampoo as you would for washing your hands with liquid soap. You can use your finger tips, a wash cloth, cotton tip or small cotton pad. You clean around the eyes right up to the edges of the eyelids and then rinse with warm water. Most people do this once or twice a day.

Dr. Mark E. GermanIf you have the symptoms noted above, give baby shampoo eyelid scrubs a try. You will probably be surprised at how such a simple remedy improves your eye comfort.

Dr. Mark German is an optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals along with Drs. Martha Jay and Josephine-Liezl Cueto. They are accepting patients of all ages into the practice and most insurance plans, including Medicare Assignment.

For more information about eye care, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


UNIDENTIFIED FLOATING OBJECTS? By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
June 10, 2013

Have you ever noticed little spots moving around in your vision? They were probably "floaters" or, in the medical term, vitreous opacities. While floaters are usually only an annoyance, a change in their appearance could be caused by a retinal tear or even a retinal detachment. Both need immediate attention.

The eye is filled with a gelatin-like material called vitreous. Over time, it breaks down - becoming more liquid with small collagen particles casting a shadow on the retina. The result is the appearance of small spots, squiggly lines, clouds or spider webs moving across your vision. Flashes of light occur when the fluid shifts within the eye, tugging on the retina (the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye). The combination of flashes of light and/or a dramatic increase in floaters could indicate that the retina is tearing and in danger of detaching. Because a retinal detachment can result in blindness, treatment must be sought immediately.

The bottom line is that an occasional floater is not a problem. But if you should see an abrupt increase in floaters, flashing lights or a loss of part of your vision in one eye, you need to be evaluated by an eye care professional soon to rule-out a retinal detachment.

Dr. Mark E. GermanAre you having an eye problem or are you due for a comprehensive eye examination? Then give us a call. You can be assured that we provide the latest in medical and surgical eye care. We welcome patients of all ages and accept most insurance plans.

Dr. Mark German is an Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He is accepting patients of all ages into his practice and most insurance plans, including Medicare Assignment.

For more eye care information visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


READY, SET... CATARACT SURGERY! By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
May 28, 2013

When you have cataract surgery, you only see a small fraction of the preparation that goes into making your procedure go smoothly. You see the thorough eye examination when we determine that you have cataracts and could benefit from surgery. You then hear an explanation about the surgery, potential complications and implant options. You schedule the surgery and arrange for a pre-operative physical with your primary care physician. You then return to our office one more time to be measured for the appropriate implant power and get last minute instructions. The next time you see me is at the hospital on the day of surgery.

What happens between that last appointment in the office and the day of surgery? LOTS! I do a thorough evaluation of your chart so I understand all your medical problems and everything about your eyes that could be important in surgery. Medical conditions such as diabetes, certain medications such as those for enlarged prostates, injuries to the eyes, eye drops used in the past, previous eye surgeries all could impact the surgery. Then I go over all the measurements to determine the implant power to give you the best possible vision after surgery. For every patient we have 3 to 5 different implants ready. The one used depends on how the surgery goes - it is good to be ready for every possibility. I then consolidate all that information on one sheet for easy reference in the operating room and notify the hospital to order the appropriate lenses.

Then there is the night before preparation.  Cataract surgery is quick (about 10-15 minutes) but requires intense concentration.  My routine for years had been about an hour of yoga the night before which helps me focus the next day - on you!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist who trained at Northwestern University in Chicago before founding Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in 1992.  She specializes in medical and surgical eye care with an emphasis on cataract surgery and  LASIK vision correction.

For more eye care information or to schedule an appointment call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


WHAT IS COLOR BLINDNESS? By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, S.C. with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
May 14, 2013

It is a common misconception that those with “color blindness” see the world in black and white. While there are extreme cases, the typical individual with this condition sees colors differently than others but mainly has trouble with hues like pastels. It is really a color deficiency rather than blindness.

The most common type of inherited color blindness affects 8% of males and is carried on the “X” chromosome. You may remember from biology that men have one X and one Y chromosome while women have 2 X chromosomes. The affected man received the gene from his mother. While she was an unaffected carrier, her father probably had issues with color perception.

Color blindness can also be acquired, meaning it can occur later in life. Possible causes include a head injury or a small stroke behind the eye. This type of problem is generally also associated with significant vision loss and usually only affects one eye.

It is not uncommon for children to be unaware they have a color problem until they have a thorough eye examination. We use a booklet with colored numbers embedded in small circles and ask the patient to read them.

Why is it important to know if you have a color deficiency? Teachers should be alerted to the issue as it may affect class work. There are some professions that require excellent color vision such as electricians and fighter pilots. Accommodations can be made for most situations but matching that tie to the pastel shirt may still take some assistance!

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an Optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin. He accepts patients of all ages into his practice and most insurance plans including Medicare Assignment.

To learn more about eye care visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


UV EXPOSURE AND COMPUTERS By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, S.C. in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
May 7, 2013

The development of cataracts and macular degeneration is associated with UV exposure. That is why we recommend good sunglasses for everyone when outside on sunny days. Most sunglasses available today offer 100% UVA and B protection. But beware of very dark older sunglasses, perhaps picked up at a secondhand store. Those older products block the brightness of sunlight but not the harmful UV rays.

What about your computer? Are you exposing yourself to harmful UV rays every day when using your computer or laptop? The answer is: “No.” Even the older CRT monitors, those large box shaped monitors that are becoming less common, release only a very low level of UV radiation. A lifetime using such a device poses no damage to your eyes. The newer LCD screens, those flat screens that are on laptops and most newer computers, emit no UV light.

So no need to wear sunglasses while working on your computer. That does not mean that computer work is without eye problems. When using a computer, we all tend to stare or blink less. This causes dryness that makes the eyes feel fatigued and can blur your vision. Taking short breaks by focusing farther away, thinking to blink more often and adding artificial tears generally is all that is needed.

Another eye-related computer problem has to do with bifocals. Using a bifocal with a computer at desk level requires that you lift your head, putting your neck in an uncomfortable position. A solution is a separate pair of glasses just for computer use. This allows you to view the screen straight ahead, relaxing your neck and you too.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin. She specializes in medical and surgical eye care such as LASIK Vision Correction, small incision cataract surgery, glaucoma care, macular degeneration, dry eye treatment and more.

To learn more about Dr. Jay and eye care, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


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