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READY, SET... CATARACT SURGERY! By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
May 28, 2013

When you have cataract surgery, you only see a small fraction of the preparation that goes into making your procedure go smoothly. You see the thorough eye examination when we determine that you have cataracts and could benefit from surgery. You then hear an explanation about the surgery, potential complications and implant options. You schedule the surgery and arrange for a pre-operative physical with your primary care physician. You then return to our office one more time to be measured for the appropriate implant power and get last minute instructions. The next time you see me is at the hospital on the day of surgery.

What happens between that last appointment in the office and the day of surgery? LOTS! I do a thorough evaluation of your chart so I understand all your medical problems and everything about your eyes that could be important in surgery. Medical conditions such as diabetes, certain medications such as those for enlarged prostates, injuries to the eyes, eye drops used in the past, previous eye surgeries all could impact the surgery. Then I go over all the measurements to determine the implant power to give you the best possible vision after surgery. For every patient we have 3 to 5 different implants ready. The one used depends on how the surgery goes - it is good to be ready for every possibility. I then consolidate all that information on one sheet for easy reference in the operating room and notify the hospital to order the appropriate lenses.

Then there is the night before preparation.  Cataract surgery is quick (about 10-15 minutes) but requires intense concentration.  My routine for years had been about an hour of yoga the night before which helps me focus the next day - on you!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist who trained at Northwestern University in Chicago before founding Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in 1992.  She specializes in medical and surgical eye care with an emphasis on cataract surgery and  LASIK vision correction.

For more eye care information or to schedule an appointment call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


WHAT IS COLOR BLINDNESS? By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, S.C. with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
May 14, 2013

It is a common misconception that those with “color blindness” see the world in black and white. While there are extreme cases, the typical individual with this condition sees colors differently than others but mainly has trouble with hues like pastels. It is really a color deficiency rather than blindness.

The most common type of inherited color blindness affects 8% of males and is carried on the “X” chromosome. You may remember from biology that men have one X and one Y chromosome while women have 2 X chromosomes. The affected man received the gene from his mother. While she was an unaffected carrier, her father probably had issues with color perception.

Color blindness can also be acquired, meaning it can occur later in life. Possible causes include a head injury or a small stroke behind the eye. This type of problem is generally also associated with significant vision loss and usually only affects one eye.

It is not uncommon for children to be unaware they have a color problem until they have a thorough eye examination. We use a booklet with colored numbers embedded in small circles and ask the patient to read them.

Why is it important to know if you have a color deficiency? Teachers should be alerted to the issue as it may affect class work. There are some professions that require excellent color vision such as electricians and fighter pilots. Accommodations can be made for most situations but matching that tie to the pastel shirt may still take some assistance!

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an Optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin. He accepts patients of all ages into his practice and most insurance plans including Medicare Assignment.

To learn more about eye care visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


UV EXPOSURE AND COMPUTERS By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, S.C. in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
May 7, 2013

The development of cataracts and macular degeneration is associated with UV exposure. That is why we recommend good sunglasses for everyone when outside on sunny days. Most sunglasses available today offer 100% UVA and B protection. But beware of very dark older sunglasses, perhaps picked up at a secondhand store. Those older products block the brightness of sunlight but not the harmful UV rays.

What about your computer? Are you exposing yourself to harmful UV rays every day when using your computer or laptop? The answer is: “No.” Even the older CRT monitors, those large box shaped monitors that are becoming less common, release only a very low level of UV radiation. A lifetime using such a device poses no damage to your eyes. The newer LCD screens, those flat screens that are on laptops and most newer computers, emit no UV light.

So no need to wear sunglasses while working on your computer. That does not mean that computer work is without eye problems. When using a computer, we all tend to stare or blink less. This causes dryness that makes the eyes feel fatigued and can blur your vision. Taking short breaks by focusing farther away, thinking to blink more often and adding artificial tears generally is all that is needed.

Another eye-related computer problem has to do with bifocals. Using a bifocal with a computer at desk level requires that you lift your head, putting your neck in an uncomfortable position. A solution is a separate pair of glasses just for computer use. This allows you to view the screen straight ahead, relaxing your neck and you too.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin. She specializes in medical and surgical eye care such as LASIK Vision Correction, small incision cataract surgery, glaucoma care, macular degeneration, dry eye treatment and more.

To learn more about Dr. Jay and eye care, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


SWIMMING AND CONTACT LENSES By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
April 23, 2013

You can’t see without your glasses and love your contacts so why not swim in them? WRONG! You should never swim in contact lenses as doing so increases your risks of developing eye problems from mild irritation to severe eye infections. Most contact lenses are at least 50% water. This means that chlorinated water penetrates your contacts and stays in contact with the surface of your eye for up to an hour after swimming. The result is an irritation to the surface of your eye and an increased risk of infection.

While a mild eye irritation may go away in a day or so, a severe eye infection can result in permanent eye damage. Even in the best maintained pool or spa, bacteria can be present. In lake water, a severe pathogen called acanthamoeba may be present that causes a difficult to treat corneal ulcer. This protozoa penetrates the cornea rapidly and often requires specially formulated eye drops to save the eye. Beaches may also present the possibility of a fusarium fungal infection.

Dr. Mark E. German Those glasses may be bulky but they are your better choice over contacts in the water! Another alternative is LASIK vision correction. That way you can free yourself of the hassles of contact lenses and glasses and still enjoy the outdoors. As you know, our Dr. Martha Jay is a leader in blade-free LASIK vision correction. There is still time to have LASIK before summer, to get started call for your free LASIK screening exam. So enjoy a safe summer by either leaving those contacts out while swimming or stepping up to LASIK.

For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


LASIK VS CATARACT SURGERY: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, Offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
April 17, 2013

Confused about the difference between LASIK and cataract surgery? You are not alone. This will be the topic of my “Morning Blend” TV appearance Monday, April 22nd and then later can be  viewed on the WTMJ website for a week.

The purpose of LASIK is to allow you to see well without glasses or contact lenses. Generally we improve your distance vision.

With cataract surgery we remove your cloudy lens inside the eye and replace it with a clear plastic implant. If you have cataracts, LASIK is not an option for you because even if you eliminated glasses your vision would still be blurred due to the cloudy cataract.

LASIK is done at an outpatient laser center using two lasers to first make a small flap and then change the shape of the front of the eye. Cataract surgery takes place in an operating room and involves using a tiny probe to remove the cloudy lens located behind the pupil before replacing it with a clear implant.

How can you tell if LASIK is an option for you or if you have significant cataracts? The only way to tell for sure is to come in for a free LASIK screening if you are interested in that procedure. The symptoms of cataracts include blurred distance vision, especially at night, along with seeing halos around light.  That would be diagnosed with a complete eye examination.

Either way, you should call us for a thorough eye examination to explore these possibilities and more. Our web site may also be helpful to further differentiate these two common eye procedures

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Dr. Mark German and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto. She received her ophthalmology training at Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago and founded Lakeshore Eye Care in 1992.


“MONOVISION” WITH CONTACTS OR LASIK By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
April 8, 2013

Monowhat? Monovision is a way to avoid reading glasses for those who wear contact lenses or are considering LASIK Vision Correction.  What we do with monovision is maximize your distance vision in one eye and your near vision in the other.  Before you say: "That sounds crazy," let me explain further.

If you have reached your mid-forties you already understand that something is happening to your near vision.  You cannot see far-away and close-up with the same glasses.  If you are wearing contact lenses you may be starting to wear drug store reading glasses ("cheaters") over the contacts to read.  This is called presbyopia and is really unavoidable.

One way around the reading glasses is to weaken the contact lens power in your non-dominant eye to improve your reading vision.  This does not mean that you have to close one eye to see close and the other to see far-away.  You just look naturally with both eyes open and most people adjust quite well.  But not everyone likes monovision -  the only way to tell is to give it a try.

Dr. Mark E. GermanThe real advantage of monovison, whether with contacts or LASIK, is the ability to read without having to hunt down your "cheaters."  The disadvantage is a slight loss of depth perception.  So it is a trade-off.  Why not try it and see if it works for you and your lifestyle?

If you end up liking monovision in contacts then you might consider this for LASIK Vision Correction.  Endless possibilities!

Dr. Mark German is accepting patients of all ages into his practice.  His colleagues at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals are Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto.

For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


NIGHT DRIVING AND CATARACTS by Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
March 5, 2013

One of the first questions we ask our patients when we see developing cataracts is about night driving. It has long been known that the vision changes from cataracts make it harder to see at night due to glare and halos around headlights. A new study also indicates that cataracts impair a driver's ability to see pedestrians at night.

The May 2012 edition of Investigative Ophthalmology, a well respected medical journal, reported on a driving simulation study where young adults were given glasses that mimicked cataract vision. Their vision was still at the level that would allow night driving in most states (20/40 on the eye chart) but their ability to see pedestrians was significantly impaired under night driving conditions.

Cataracts develop slowly, so often patients are not aware of the vision problem. It is only after surgery that they realize how good their vision can be. That is why a complete eye examination is suggested every one to two years to be sure there are no significant cataracts that could put the patient or others in danger while driving, especially at night.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Cataract surgery is generally a 10 to 15 minute procedure without the need for shots, patches or stitches. Do yourself and your neighbors a favor and schedule your comprehensive eye examination today. Besides cataracts, we also evaluate you for other eye conditions such as glaucoma, macular degeneration, and dry eyes along with checking your glasses prescription to optimize your vision. See you soon!

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician and Surgeon) practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. They have two offices in Ozaukee County, in Mequon & Saukville. Both easily accessible from Highway 43.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


OPTOMETRIST OR OPHTHALMOLOGIST? WHICH IS BEST FOR YOU? By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
February 13, 2013

There are two types of eye doctors: Optometrists and Ophthalmologists.  Both do complete eye examinations, prescribe glasses and screen for eye diseases such as glaucoma or cataracts.  The difference is that an ophthalmologist is a medical doctor and a surgeon.  If you have a medical or surgical eye problem, then you should schedule with one of our ophthalmologists (Dr. Jay or Dr. Cueto).  If you have relatively healthy eyes and want to be sure you are seeing as well as possible, then our optometrist (me) is a better choice.

I have been practicing optometry for over 25 years.  In that time, I have seen just about every eye problem out there.  While I specialize in contact lens fitting and general eye examinations, I also do annual screenings for diabetic eye disease and other medical eye problems.  I joined Lakeshore Eye Care in 2000.

Why see me instead of Dr. Jay or Cueto?  The main reason is convenience, especially if you wear contact lenses.  I do the contact lens fitting at Lakeshore Eye Care so if you have your exam with one of our surgeons, you will need a second appointment with me for the contacts.  So why not start with me in the first place? Another reason is that I usually run pretty much on time because my patients lack the complex medical and surgical problems confronted by Drs. Jay and Cueto.

Dr. Mark E. GermanNot everyone needs to see an eye surgeon for their care.  By scheduling with me, you will be seen faster and still benefit from the excellent quality of care provided at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals.

Dr. Mark German is an Optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with two offices in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin (Mequon & Saukville). His Ophthalmology colleagues are Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto.

To schedule appointment or learn more about vision-related topics, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


POOR VISION IS DEPRESSING by Dr. Martha Jay at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
February 5, 2013

Do you know an older person who seems depressed? Common symptoms include decreased energy, insomnia, irritability or an appetite change. While getting older has many challenges, a recent study indicates that poor vision may contribute to depression in older adults. The good news is that many causes of poor vision can be treated providing literally a new view on life for seniors.

The study appeared in Investigative Ophthalmology, a scientific journal, last April. The link between poor vision and depression was found to be due to the decreased mobility vision impaired adults experience.  After a lifetime of being able to care for themselves and go wherever they want, being stuck at home is not good for the psyche.

If you think this is a problem with your friend or family member, a first step is to schedule a complete eye examination with us and a thorough medical evaluation with their primary care doctor.  Many vision problems like cataracts and some types of macular degeneration can be treated with successful improvements in vision. Medical issues such as over-medication or an under active thyroid can also be easily adjusted.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

If all that checks out, you can ease the burden by being there to transport and engage that at-risk senior. Let them feel like life is worth living. Sure you may hear "I don't know why they call them the golden years," but at least you can make the transition a bit easier.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist who specialized in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and blade- free iLASIK.  Her colleagues at Lakeshore Eye Care are Dr. Mark German and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto.

To learn more about eye care topics, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


WHY WE DO WHAT WE DO By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, S.C. in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
January 21, 2013

What are all those questions, measurements and eye drops about when you come for an eye exam?  These are reasonable questions that most of us wonder about but rarely think to ask.  A complete eye exam is a thorough medical evaluation of your eyes and your vision.

We start with a comprehensive medical history because many medical conditions and medications can affect the eyes. Diabetes and high blood pressure are obvious but arthritic conditions, neurological problems and many other medical diagnoses can have an influence on the functioning of the eyes.  We then ask about any vision problems you may be having to get a sense of how your vision is affecting activities such as driving and reading.

The measuring comes in with determining your current glasses prescription and seeing if we can improve on that with a change - this is called refraction. We also check your pupils, eye movements, side vision and eye pressure.  All these factors are critical to being sure no problems such as glaucoma are present.

The reason for the dilating drops is to get a clear view of the back of your eye called the retina.  This is the only place in the body where we can directly view blood vessels which can be affected by diabetes and other problems. We also look for tears, tumors and evidence of macular degeneration.

Dr. Mark E. GermanSo each and every step is important at least every 1-2 years!

Dr. Mark German is and Optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto.

For more eye care information call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


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