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DARK CHOCOLATE WINS THE VISION TEST By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 5, 2018

This headline particularly caught my eye: “New benefit of dark chocolate could be in sight, literally.” It was reporting on a study published in the medical journal Ophthalmology that analyzed vision parameters in volunteers after they consumed either a dark chocolate bar or a milk chocolate bar. The dark chocolate group had an improvement in contrast sensitivity (the ability to detect line separations) and vision when measured two hours later compared to the milk chocolate group.

What is the possible mechanism of this finding? Dark chocolate contains antioxidants known as flavonoids. These naturally occurring compounds have been linked to a number of health benefits including decreased inflammation; improved blood flow; along with increasing the “good” HDL cholesterol and decreasing the “bad” LDL cholesterol. Dark chocolate also contains a number of minerals such as iron, magnesium, copper and manganese.  Dark chocolate has been linked with improved brain function, decreased heart disease risk and protecting the skin from sun damage.

As a frequent reader of this column, you are also well aware of other things you can do to protect your vision including NOT smoking, incorporating plenty of leafy green vegetables in your diet and wearing sunglasses. These three lifestyle choices will have a much greater impact on your vision in the future than an occasional dark chocolate bar!

As with most things in life, too much of anything is generally not healthy. Watch the sugar content in those dark chocolate bars and do not overdue it.  The take home point of the study is that milk chocolate is just not worth the calories – go for the good stuff!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


DON'T FLUSH THOSE CONTACTS! See recent New York Times article

By user-admin
August 29, 2018

Click on the image to the left for a recent New York Times articles explaining why you should NOT flush your contacts down the toilet. They belong in the wastebasket!


CLEANING & DISINFECTING CONTACT LENSES By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 24, 2018

August 20-24 was the Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) fifth annual contact lens health week.  Contact lenses provide an excellent option to allow for clear vision.  Most contacts, however, do require cleaning and disinfection to keep your eyes healthy.

The first step for good contact lens care is to handle contacts with clean hands.  Try to avoid moisturizing soaps as the moisturizer can stick to contacts.  Rinse the hands thoroughly after washing and dry with a lint free towel.

Cleaning the contact lens after removal is important.  Every time a contact lens is inserted into the eye it develops some buildup.  It is recommended to put a few drops of multipurpose cleaner/disinfectant on a contact lens and then rub it in the palm of your hand gently for a few seconds.  This is recommended even with “No Rub” solutions.  This removes the daily dirt and debris from the contact lens.  Next rinse the contact with saline or multipurpose solution to remove the loose debris.

Contact lenses have to be stored in a contact lens case with contact lens disinfectant when they are not on the eye.  It is important to replace the solution daily and keep the case clean.  This kills the bacteria and other microorganisms that stick to the contact lens after it has been worn on the eye.  Disinfection storage time varies from product to product, but is usually at least 6 hours.

There are many types of contact lens disinfection solutions on the market.  Your eye doctor will recommend the appropriate one for your type of contacts.  Keeping the contacts clean and disinfected can make wearing contacts comfortable and maintain you eye health.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an Optometrist practicing with Dr. Martha Jay at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. He specializes in comprehensive eye examinations and contact lens fitting, especially for those hard to fit patients or those new to contact lenses.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


New York Times Article: The more education you have, the more likely you are to be nearsighted

By user-admin
August 20, 2018

Click on the image to the left for a recent New York Times article discussing the link between education level and nearsightedness.  While we are on the topic, LASIK makes a fabulous graduation present!


CATCH MORE Z’S AND SEE BETTER By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 20, 2018

Burning the candle at both ends? Neglecting your sleep can have an adverse effect on your vision and your eyes by worsening dry eye symptoms. Dry eye syndrome is one of the most common reasons for a visit to an eye doctor, affecting 3.25 million women in the US over the age of 50.  A recent study showed that sleep deprivation can lead to worsening dry eye symptoms.

The symptoms of dry eye syndrome include feeling like there is something in your eye, blurred vision and excessive tearing. The last symptom, tearing, is what gets patients confused. “I thought my eyes were too wet”, is the usual comment.  Your tear film is made up of oil, water and mucus. If your mixture of the three is abnormal, it poorly covers the surface of the eye leaving dry spots. The tiny nerve endings in the surface of the eye (the cornea) detect the problem and send out more, poor quality tears resulting in the annoying drip down your face. This problem is particularly noticeable at the end of the day, after reading or using a computer, in winter or when you are out in the wind.

The study published in the medical journal Investigative Ophthalmology last summer divided a group of 20 healthy individuals into two groups: one stayed up all night and the other had an 8 hour sleep period. The “all nighters” had very salty tears which poorly covered their eyes.  Their eyes were uncomfortable and their vision blurred.

The lesson here is that your eyes need rest too, especially if you already have dry eye symptoms or wear contact lenses. Should adequate rest not solve your dry eye symptoms, however, we are here to help.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an Opt0metrist practicing with Dr. Martha Jay at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He offers comprehensive eye care for the whole family and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WHAT IS CATARACT SURGERY LIKE? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
July 13, 2018

What exactly happens during cataract surgery?  Many with cataracts are afraid to have the surgery because they don’t really know what it would be like. Just the word “surgery” scares them. It brings to mind pain, long recovery and time off from your favorite activities. Nothing could be farther from the truth with cataract surgery.

Modern cataract surgery is done without shots, stitches or patches. It takes only about 10 to 15 minutes. We use only mild I.V. sedation to relax you.  You don’t feel anything because there are numbing drops applied to the surface of the eye. Afterwards, you look pretty much the way you did on the way in: no patch over the eye, no black and blue bruising. We recommend that you take 2 days off your regular activities, one for the actual procedure and the next day to allow your vision to settle. Then the only restrictions are no eye make-up, swimming or pushing on the eye for 2 weeks.

On the day of surgery, you change into a hospital gown and then an I.V. is started. Once in the operating room you look at a bright light. There IS NO PAIN. You may see pretty colors from a prism like effect of the lens as we remove it and replace it with a tiny plastic implant.  About 30 minutes after the procedure, you go home or even out to lunch. You do need a ride as some of the sedation may still be in effect but you won’t need extra help at home.

So, breath-in and breath-out, cataracts surgery is generally a quick and easy. It is the most common operation in America and patients are thrilled with the results.  If every procedure worked as well as cataract surgery, the world would be a much better place!

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 

 


SMOKING AND “WET” MACULAR DEGENERATION By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 20, 2018

Our patients who smoke know that we discuss the potential impact of this habit on vision at each and every appointment. There is even a reporting measure on this topic required for getting credit from Medicare for using electronic medical records. I also give out the “Handout of Shame” to encourage quitting.

Now yet another study has come out linking smoking to “wet” macular degeneration.  Macular degeneration is an aging change that affects the delicate retinal tissue in the back of the eye. It is the leading cause of legal blindness for those over 65 years-old. There is a “dry” or mild type and also a much more severe “wet” type. The wet type results from fluid leaking forward under the retina damaging the critical central part of your vision used for reading. Those with the wet form often have to get injections in their eyes every 3-4 months in an attempt to improve their vision.

A study came out last fall in the British Journal of Ophthalmology, a respected medical journal, linking smoking and wet macular degeneration. They analyzed the data of over half a million South Korean men between the ages of 40 and 79 years-old. Apparently few women smoke in Korea so they were not included. Wet macular degeneration risk was 50% higher in smokers than those who had never smoked. Both the length of time someone smoked and the amount they smoked was significant.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

You know that smoking is bad for your heart, breathing and pocketbook. Now there is yet another study liking vison loss to this habit. Your primary care physician would be thrilled to assist you in making this important lifestyle change to invest in your future medical and visual health.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and blade free LASIK. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


YOU WANT TO PUT PLUGS IN MY EYELIDS?? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 14, 2018

When we suggest punctal “plugs” to a patient, the reaction varies from curiosity to outright panic.  While they are quite routine dry eye care, many patients have not heard of them.  The goal of the plugs is to keep the tears you have in your eyes longer, decreasing your need for tear supplements and improving your eye comfort.

On the upper and lower eyelids in each eye, there are a total of 4 small openings towards the nose which are called puncta.  Each leads to a tiny tube that drains your tears into the back of your nose. The bottom ones carry about 2/3 of the tears and the top the other 1/3. If we block the bottom puncta in each eye, your eyes stay wetter. The plugs are very small, about 1-2 mm, and made of soft plastic. They are easily inserted in the office in a matter of seconds.

Generally we do not suggest plugs at the first signs of dry eyes. We try artificial tears first. If the patient feels that they need to use the tears more than 4 times per day or they are not providing any relief, then plugs or a prescription product called Restasis or Xiidra may be suggested. Those products change the quality of the tears so they coat the eye better. As noted above, the plugs change the quantity of the tears. Sometimes both quality and quantity need improvement. Should that be the case, then plugs and Restasis or Xiidra might be used together.

The symptoms of dry eyes include blurred reading vision at the end of the day, feeling like there is something in the eyes, eye fatigue, red eyes and more. Give us a call if you need relief from this common eye problem.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


SHOULD YOU HAVE CATARACT SURGERY ON YOUR SECOND EYE? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 18, 2018

Cataract surgery is the most common operation in the America. It is generally a 10 minute procedure done without the need for shots, stitches or patches. 95% of patients who have cataract surgery are thrilled with the results.  Occasionally the question comes up about whether someone should have their second eye done after doing well with their first eye.

The obvious advantages of having the second eye done are convenience: you only have to be measured for the implants once, you only need one physical with your doctor and you only need to change your glasses once. The eyes also work better when both have about the same vision, this improves depth perception and overall acuity.

A recent study in the medical journal Ophthalmology identified even more advantages.  They followed 328 patients undergoing cataract surgery and judged their vision related quality of life after each surgery with the National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire. While there was a larger improvement after the first eye, as generally the eye with the worst vision is done first, there was still a statistically significant improvement after the second surgery.

When seen for a cataract evaluation, we will let you know if one or both eyes are eligible for surgery at this time. This is based on vision, how the cataract looks on examination and your visual complaints. If we suggest both eyes, then the new study indicates that you won’t regret having that second eye done.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


BLOOD RED EYE? By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 15, 2018

When you look in the mirror and see that the white part of your eye is suddenly blood red, it can be quite scary.  But not every red eye is a problem.  You should be concerned if there is associated eye pain, discharge, light sensitivity or a change in your vision.  Should any of those symptoms occur, you should see your eye care professional promptly.

But a “blood-red” eye is often just that: blood.  A small blood vessel may have broken on the surface of the eye, trapping a drop of blood under the thin, clear membrane that covers the eye called the conjunctiva.  That’s why its call a “sub-conjunctival” hemorrhage.  They are painless and don’t affect your vision.  It is not uncommon for one to be noticed by someone else with a comment like, “What happened to your eye?  You should get that checked out!”

A sub-conjunctival hemorrhage usually occurs spontaneously, not the result of trauma.  As far as treatment, there is not really anything you can do to make them resolve sooner than 7-10 days.  Eye drops, such as artificial tears, are sometimes used for minor associated irritation.  But you should be sure not to rub the eye for 2-4 weeks as that could cause another bleeding episode.

Are you still not sure about your red eye?  Call for an appointment.  We would much prefer to set your mind at ease rather than let a more serious problem go without treatment.  We look forward to meeting you.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an Optometrist practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


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