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CATARACT SURGERY IMPROVES YOUR OUTLOOK ON LIFE By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon/Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 20, 2019

When you think of cataract surgery, generally the visual change that comes to mind is an improvement in clarity but there are other added benefits: you color vision improves also. Cataracts cause the lens inside your eye to turn a yellow/brown. This makes blues look darker and whites to have a yellowed appearance. Before surgery this is not very noticeable as the change is quite gradual. When we do cataract surgery, we replace the yellowed natural lens with a clear plastic implant. Then, overnight, blues appear more vivid and whites whiter!  Since we operate on one eye at a time, the color perception difference between eyes is noticeable while waiting for the second eye to have surgery. Once both eyes have the implants, however, the world looks not only clearer but more colorful too!

How do you know if you have cataracts? Generally the symptoms include blurred distance vision, especially for driving at night. Sometimes you see glare or halos around lights. The actual diagnosis has to be made by your eye doctor after a complete, dilated eye examination. There are many other possible sources of blurred vision.  Some are minor and others are more serious. You could just need an adjustment in your glasses prescription or you could have a problem with your retina such as macular degeneration.

To get started on improving your outlook on life, schedule an eye examination and we will determine how to make you see as well as possible. Should your problem be cataracts, the surgery takes only 10-15 minutes and nowadays you generally don’t have to bother with shots, stitches or patches. See you soon!

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Eye Physician & Surgeon (Ophthalmologist) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery, blade-free LASIK, glaucoma treatments, macular degeneration care, dry eye management and more. She practices at Madison Medical Eye Care with Drs. Martha Jay and James Ivanoski. They have offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


IS YOUR EYE PROBLEM AN EMERGENCY? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care - Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 19, 2019

You know that you should have your eyes examined every one to two years or more frequently if you have active eye problems such as glaucoma.  More questionable is when you should be seen right away, in other words what constitutes an eye emergency.

Sudden vision loss or decreased vision in one or both eyes is definitely an eye emergency.  Loss of vision may include:  a total blacking out of vision, missing a portion of vision (like the entire right side being gone), having a curtain come down across the vision and/or sudden blurred vision that is not resolving.  Any sudden loss of vision should be evaluated promptly to determine the cause and possible treatment.

New onset double vision should also be evaluated promptly, especially if it goes away when you cover one eye.  This may be a sign of uncontrolled diabetes, high blood pressure, multiple sclerosis or other conditions that affect the brain.

Any trauma to the eyes should always be seen as soon as possible.  Any chemicals that get in the eye should be rinsed out copiously with water for 15-30 minutes even before coming in. Injuries that cause a lot of eye pain, light sensitivity, double vision or decreased vision should be evaluated right away.

Red eyes and associated significant pain, light sensitivity or decreased vision should be seen quickly.  Some eye infections or inflammations can cause permanent vision loss if not treated promptly.

Our staff is very good at determining what constitutes an eye emergency. Give us a call if you have any doubts about whether you eye problem is an emergency and we will be sure that you get the care you need in a timely manner.

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Eye Physician & Surgeon (Ophthalmologist) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


WHAT IS CATARACT REALLY SURGERY LIKE? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madision Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 16, 2019

Have you been delaying having cataract surgery because you are apprehensive about what the experience may be like? Does just the word “surgery” scare you? Does it bring to mind pain, long recovery and time off from your favorite activities? Fear not, nothing could be farther from the truth with cataract surgery these days.

We do cataract surgery generally without shots, stitches or patches and the whole procedure takes only 10-15 minutes. We use mild I.V. sedation to relax you and numbing drops on the surface of the eye to prevent pain. Afterwards, you look pretty much the way you did on the way in: no patch over the eye, no black and blue bruising. You should take 2 days off your regular activities, one for the actual procedure and the next day to allow your vision to settle down. Then the only restrictions then are to avoid eye make-up, swimming or pushing on the eye for 2 weeks.

On the day of surgery, you change into a hospital gown and an I.V. is started. Once in the operating room, your job is to look at a bright light. You may see pretty colors like a prism as we remove your natural lens and replace it with a tiny plastic implant.  About 30 minutes after the procedure, you go home or even out to lunch. You do need a ride, as some of the sedation may still be in effect, but you won’t need extra help at home.

So, breath-in and breath-out, cataracts surgery is generally a quick and easy event. It is the most common operation in America and patients are typically thrilled with the results.  If every procedure worked as well as cataract surgery, the world would be a much better place!

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski. She manages medical and surgical eye conditions such as cataracts, LASIK vision correction, glaucoma, macular degeneration, dry eyes and more.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


FLEX PLANS & LASIK for 2020 By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 10, 2019

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Another summer annoyed with contacts and glasses but worried how LASIK might fit your budget?  If that sounds like you, don’t overlook the savings offered by Flexible Spending or Health Savings Accounts.  While not a component of all benefit packages, many employers do provide this option to utilize pre-tax income for medical procedures such as LASIK.  The rules vary but most plans require a fall commitment for the following year.  Check with your Human Resources Officer to determine your specific deadline.

Even if one of these plans is not an option for you, LASIK actually saves you money compared to staying in contacts and/or glasses. You may not realize it but those expenses add up: If you are now 30 years-old and wear 2 week disposable contacts, you can expect to spend $21,900 over the rest of your life on contacts, glasses and solutions!

Many but all people are good candidates for blade-free LASIK. That’s why a LASIK screening exam is critical before committing Flex funds for coming year. This complimentary evaluation involves critical measurements of your vision and your eyes to determine if LASIK is meant for you.  You’ll learn a lot about LASIK and have a chance to get acquainted with our great Madison Medical Eye Care team, now even better with the addition of Dr. Lisa Bennett.

Plan ahead to improve your outlook on life in 2020! Call today to arrange your free, no-pressure LASIK screening exam.  It just might be that 2020 is your year for 20/20!

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com

 


BLUE BLOCKERS By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 23, 2019

Blue blocker glasses are a hot topic in eye care.  These amber tinted sunglasses reduce glare and protect the eyes from ultraviolet light (invisible radiation from the sun that causes sunburn) and visible blue light.

For years we have known that ultraviolet light (invisible radiation from the sun that causes sunburn) can accelerate age related eye problems like cataracts, skin cancer, and macular degeneration.  We recommend that everybody wear sunglasses (including blue blockers) when outdoors to protect the eyes from ultraviolet light.

Now studies are being done on visible blue light and the effects on the eyes.   There is no conclusive evidence that blue light from hand held devices and computer screens damage the eyes in the same way that ultraviolet light does.  Our computers and phones are not causing macular degeneration and cataracts.  We do not recommend specific blue blocking glasses for computer use, but sometimes a light amber tint may improve comfort (reduce eye strain and glare) when viewing a computer screen.

The blue light from computers and hand held devices has been shown to affect sleep cycles.  It is recommended to avoid screen time 1-2 hours before bedtime.  Lack of sleep affects overall health including eye health

Dr. James Ivanoski

Eye strain and dry eye are worsened by excessive screen time.  It is recommended to take a break from computer work every 20 minutes to look at a farther away object for at least 20 seconds.  Blue blocker glasses are a good thing since they also protect from the harmful ultraviolet light, but are not necessary for looking at computer screens or phones.

Dr. James is an Optometrist practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He specializes in comprehensive eye care for all ages and accepts most insurance plans.  He particularly welcomes contact lens wearers who have been having difficulties getting the right fit or vision from their contacts in the past.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


MORE EVIDENCE FOR THE iSTENT By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 21, 2019

We have been recommending the iStent at the time of cataract surgery over the last few years for our patients who have both cataracts and glaucoma.  The purpose of the iStent is to increase the flow of fluid out of the eye in order to decrease eye pressure. Glaucoma is a condition where the fluid in the eye is either coming in too fast or leaving too slowly.  The buildup of pressure can cause permanent vision loss so is generally treated with eye drops.

The iStent is a tiny device, in fact it is the smallest implantable device in medicine measuring only 230 microns by 360 microns. As you may remember, there are only 1000 microns in a millimeter so that means it is only around ¼ by 1/3 of a millimeter.  After the cataract is removed and the lens inserted, we have the patient turn their head to one side and then place two of these iStents at the edge of the eye. You cannot see them without special mirrors.

When compared to cataract surgery alone, we know that the iStent does generally result in lower eye pressure. A new study just came out looked at if there was a difference in the number of glaucoma eye drops patients used after cataract surgery and found that those with the iStent had a reduction even if they were using 3 or more drops. In fact, the more the drops used the bigger the drop in the number required. This was reported in the medical journal Ophthalmology in January.  The data came from a managed care network and involved almost 3000 patients.

These results mirror what we have found also with this remarkable device. We can talk about whether the iStent is an option for you at your cataract evaluation.

Dr. Martha Jay is an Eye Physician & Surgeon practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. She specializes in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


HOW DO YOU KNOW IF YOUR CATARACTS ARE “RIPE” By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with officies in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 14, 2019

We get this question about whether a patient’s cataracts are “ripe” on a frequent basis. You too may be wondering about where this comes from and what it means. It is really a holdover from the way cataracts where done in the distant past, back 20 plus years ago. At that time cataract surgery consisted of making a large, almost 180 degree incision along the top part of the eye. The cloudy lens was then gently pushed out of the eye. If it was too soft, or “not ripe,” then it was difficult to remove in one piece.

Thankfully those days are long gone along with the shots around the eye and the patch worn afterwards. Today’s cataract surgery involves a small 2.4 mm incision. The lens is liquefied with sound waves and gently removed with a tiny aspiration probe. Instead of taking up to an hour, it is more like a 10 to 15 minute procedure. Instead of leaving with your eye patched, you go home already being able to see pretty well.

But the “ripe” concept lives on! Today we as doctors don’t use the term but if we did it would concern whether your cataracts were severe enough to warrant surgery. That means that you must be bothered by your vision, such as being frustrated due to the lack of clarity or glare symptoms while driving at night. Then your vison must be worse than a certain level on the eye chart. Finally, an exam must confirm that you have cataracts and that you could benefit from surgery.

All these things can be determined at the time of a comprehensive eye examination. To find out if your cataracts are ‘ripe” call to arrange your appointment today. Remember I am seeing patients in both our Mequon & Saukville offices. See you soon!

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Eye Physician & Surgeon (Ophthalmologist) specializing in cataract surgery, LASIK vision correction, glaucoma care and more. She practices with Drs. Martha Jay and James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


METFORMIN MAY DECREASE YOUR RISK FOR MACULAR DEGENERATION By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 13, 2019

No one likes being told that they are now a diabetic and need to take medications. You usually try losing weight first but even then you sometimes just have to face the facts: you need a medication like metformin to bring your blood sugars down. There was a recent study that may make you more enthusiastic about taking the pills: it appears that the use of metformin may decrease the risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, a leading cause of vision loss in those over 65 years-old!

The study appeared in the medical journal Investigative Ophthalmology in April. The medical records of almost 8000 patients over the age of 55 year-old in Florida with newly diagnosed dry macular degeneration were analyzed.  They all had at least 3 complete eye examinations without evidence of macular degeneration before starting the metformin.  They were compared against a control group with 4 consecutive examinations without evidence of macular degeneration. Those taking metformin were 32% less likely to be diagnosed with macular degeneration.

Of course this does not mean that those who do not need metformin for diabetes should start taking it. It also does not establish cause and effect as the data is what we call “retrospective” or looking back. It is very interesting, however, and gives those reluctant diabetics out there cause for a little joy.

Macular degeneration is an aging change affecting the back of the eye known as the retina. It has both a mild “dry” and more aggressive “wet” form. Besides taking metformin if you doctor recommends it, other protective measures include eating plenty of leafy green vegetables, wearing sunglasses outside and not smoking.

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care. She practices with Drs. James Ivanoski and Martha Jay at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


SLEEP IMPROVES DRY EYES By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 13, 2019

Sleep problems affect many: either not being able to get to sleep, not being able to stay asleep, being sleepy during the day, and/or breathing problems such as sleep apnea during the night. They affect how you feel the next day and how productive you can be.  Dry eyes are an even more common annoyance. The symptoms of dry eyes generally include a sandy sensation or the feeling that there is something in your eyes.  Blurred near vision, especially towards the end of the day or with computer use, is also frequently noticed.  A new study has now linked the two.

Published in the medical journal Investigative Ophthalmology in May, a study out of Singapore found that insomnia, sleep apnea and reduced hours of sleep per night were all associated with an increase in the severity of dry eye symptoms.  They used a number of well-known questionnaires to assess the sleep patterns of over 3 thousand people and then obtained a detailed history of their dry eye symptoms. Most of the sleep issues noted above were associated with at least a 70% increase in dry eye symptoms.

Dr. James Ivanoski

What can you do about it? You can consult your primary care physician about further evaluation and treatment of your sleep issues. They can determine if further testing is indicated or if changes in your medications are recommended. In the mean time you can treat your dry eyes with artificial tears. If you are using the tears more than 4 times per day be sure to use the preservative-free type that come in individual vials so as not to cause more eye irritation. There are prescription medications for dry eyes if tears do not work. We can discuss those and other options at your next eye examination. Call for a sooner appointment if your symptoms of dry eyes are not improving.

Dr. Ivanoski is an optometrist practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with Drs. Martha Jay and Lisa Bennett.  He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WELCOME DR. BENNETT! By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 28, 2019

I am so pleased, along with Dr. Ivanoski and our entire staff at Madison Medical Eye care, that the day has almost come for Dr. Lisa Bennett to join our team! She is an Eye Physician and Surgeon specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as cataract surgery, LASIK vision correction, glaucoma care, macular degeneration management, dry eye treatments and more. She is scheduling appointments for August so now is the perfect time to call for your next eye examination with her.

Dr. Bennett is moving to the Milwaukee area after completing her ophthalmology training at St. Louis University. She graduated summa cum laude from the University of Minnesota with a B.S. in Biochemistry and then completed her M.D. degree at the Chicago Medical School.  Up next was a transitional year in Internal Medicine at the University of Chicago. This is required of all ophthalmologists to be sure they are well grounded in general medicine before specializing in eye care.

She very much enjoys teaching and has instructed part of the cataract surgery courses at Saint Louis University.  Her greatest passion is to be able to offer her patients the newest and most advanced medical and surgical eye care technologies available.  She has a personal experience with LASIK, having had the procedure herself. She is pleased to offer astigmatism correction and multifocal implants with cataract surgery, as well as blade-free LASIK and PRK.

She is not all work, however, she enjoys being active and has completed two marathons.  She and her husband also enjoy hiking, traveling and of course Wisconsin cheese.  You will be please to know that she will be seeing patients at both the Mequon and Saukville offices.

Give her a try, you will be very impressed.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


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