Recent posts

SWIMMING AND CONTACT LENSES By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
April 23, 2013

You can’t see without your glasses and love your contacts so why not swim in them? WRONG! You should never swim in contact lenses as doing so increases your risks of developing eye problems from mild irritation to severe eye infections. Most contact lenses are at least 50% water. This means that chlorinated water penetrates your contacts and stays in contact with the surface of your eye for up to an hour after swimming. The result is an irritation to the surface of your eye and an increased risk of infection.

While a mild eye irritation may go away in a day or so, a severe eye infection can result in permanent eye damage. Even in the best maintained pool or spa, bacteria can be present. In lake water, a severe pathogen called acanthamoeba may be present that causes a difficult to treat corneal ulcer. This protozoa penetrates the cornea rapidly and often requires specially formulated eye drops to save the eye. Beaches may also present the possibility of a fusarium fungal infection.

Dr. Mark E. German Those glasses may be bulky but they are your better choice over contacts in the water! Another alternative is LASIK vision correction. That way you can free yourself of the hassles of contact lenses and glasses and still enjoy the outdoors. As you know, our Dr. Martha Jay is a leader in blade-free LASIK vision correction. There is still time to have LASIK before summer, to get started call for your free LASIK screening exam. So enjoy a safe summer by either leaving those contacts out while swimming or stepping up to LASIK.

For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


LASIK VS CATARACT SURGERY: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, Offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
April 17, 2013

Confused about the difference between LASIK and cataract surgery? You are not alone. This will be the topic of my “Morning Blend” TV appearance Monday, April 22nd and then later can be  viewed on the WTMJ website for a week.

The purpose of LASIK is to allow you to see well without glasses or contact lenses. Generally we improve your distance vision.

With cataract surgery we remove your cloudy lens inside the eye and replace it with a clear plastic implant. If you have cataracts, LASIK is not an option for you because even if you eliminated glasses your vision would still be blurred due to the cloudy cataract.

LASIK is done at an outpatient laser center using two lasers to first make a small flap and then change the shape of the front of the eye. Cataract surgery takes place in an operating room and involves using a tiny probe to remove the cloudy lens located behind the pupil before replacing it with a clear implant.

How can you tell if LASIK is an option for you or if you have significant cataracts? The only way to tell for sure is to come in for a free LASIK screening if you are interested in that procedure. The symptoms of cataracts include blurred distance vision, especially at night, along with seeing halos around light.  That would be diagnosed with a complete eye examination.

Either way, you should call us for a thorough eye examination to explore these possibilities and more. Our web site may also be helpful to further differentiate these two common eye procedures

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Dr. Mark German and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto. She received her ophthalmology training at Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago and founded Lakeshore Eye Care in 1992.


“MONOVISION” WITH CONTACTS OR LASIK By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
April 8, 2013

Monowhat? Monovision is a way to avoid reading glasses for those who wear contact lenses or are considering LASIK Vision Correction.  What we do with monovision is maximize your distance vision in one eye and your near vision in the other.  Before you say: "That sounds crazy," let me explain further.

If you have reached your mid-forties you already understand that something is happening to your near vision.  You cannot see far-away and close-up with the same glasses.  If you are wearing contact lenses you may be starting to wear drug store reading glasses ("cheaters") over the contacts to read.  This is called presbyopia and is really unavoidable.

One way around the reading glasses is to weaken the contact lens power in your non-dominant eye to improve your reading vision.  This does not mean that you have to close one eye to see close and the other to see far-away.  You just look naturally with both eyes open and most people adjust quite well.  But not everyone likes monovision -  the only way to tell is to give it a try.

Dr. Mark E. GermanThe real advantage of monovison, whether with contacts or LASIK, is the ability to read without having to hunt down your "cheaters."  The disadvantage is a slight loss of depth perception.  So it is a trade-off.  Why not try it and see if it works for you and your lifestyle?

If you end up liking monovision in contacts then you might consider this for LASIK Vision Correction.  Endless possibilities!

Dr. Mark German is accepting patients of all ages into his practice.  His colleagues at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals are Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto.

For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


NIGHT DRIVING AND CATARACTS by Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
March 5, 2013

One of the first questions we ask our patients when we see developing cataracts is about night driving. It has long been known that the vision changes from cataracts make it harder to see at night due to glare and halos around headlights. A new study also indicates that cataracts impair a driver's ability to see pedestrians at night.

The May 2012 edition of Investigative Ophthalmology, a well respected medical journal, reported on a driving simulation study where young adults were given glasses that mimicked cataract vision. Their vision was still at the level that would allow night driving in most states (20/40 on the eye chart) but their ability to see pedestrians was significantly impaired under night driving conditions.

Cataracts develop slowly, so often patients are not aware of the vision problem. It is only after surgery that they realize how good their vision can be. That is why a complete eye examination is suggested every one to two years to be sure there are no significant cataracts that could put the patient or others in danger while driving, especially at night.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Cataract surgery is generally a 10 to 15 minute procedure without the need for shots, patches or stitches. Do yourself and your neighbors a favor and schedule your comprehensive eye examination today. Besides cataracts, we also evaluate you for other eye conditions such as glaucoma, macular degeneration, and dry eyes along with checking your glasses prescription to optimize your vision. See you soon!

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician and Surgeon) practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. They have two offices in Ozaukee County, in Mequon & Saukville. Both easily accessible from Highway 43.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


OPTOMETRIST OR OPHTHALMOLOGIST? WHICH IS BEST FOR YOU? By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
February 13, 2013

There are two types of eye doctors: Optometrists and Ophthalmologists.  Both do complete eye examinations, prescribe glasses and screen for eye diseases such as glaucoma or cataracts.  The difference is that an ophthalmologist is a medical doctor and a surgeon.  If you have a medical or surgical eye problem, then you should schedule with one of our ophthalmologists (Dr. Jay or Dr. Cueto).  If you have relatively healthy eyes and want to be sure you are seeing as well as possible, then our optometrist (me) is a better choice.

I have been practicing optometry for over 25 years.  In that time, I have seen just about every eye problem out there.  While I specialize in contact lens fitting and general eye examinations, I also do annual screenings for diabetic eye disease and other medical eye problems.  I joined Lakeshore Eye Care in 2000.

Why see me instead of Dr. Jay or Cueto?  The main reason is convenience, especially if you wear contact lenses.  I do the contact lens fitting at Lakeshore Eye Care so if you have your exam with one of our surgeons, you will need a second appointment with me for the contacts.  So why not start with me in the first place? Another reason is that I usually run pretty much on time because my patients lack the complex medical and surgical problems confronted by Drs. Jay and Cueto.

Dr. Mark E. GermanNot everyone needs to see an eye surgeon for their care.  By scheduling with me, you will be seen faster and still benefit from the excellent quality of care provided at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals.

Dr. Mark German is an Optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with two offices in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin (Mequon & Saukville). His Ophthalmology colleagues are Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto.

To schedule appointment or learn more about vision-related topics, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


POOR VISION IS DEPRESSING by Dr. Martha Jay at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
February 5, 2013

Do you know an older person who seems depressed? Common symptoms include decreased energy, insomnia, irritability or an appetite change. While getting older has many challenges, a recent study indicates that poor vision may contribute to depression in older adults. The good news is that many causes of poor vision can be treated providing literally a new view on life for seniors.

The study appeared in Investigative Ophthalmology, a scientific journal, last April. The link between poor vision and depression was found to be due to the decreased mobility vision impaired adults experience.  After a lifetime of being able to care for themselves and go wherever they want, being stuck at home is not good for the psyche.

If you think this is a problem with your friend or family member, a first step is to schedule a complete eye examination with us and a thorough medical evaluation with their primary care doctor.  Many vision problems like cataracts and some types of macular degeneration can be treated with successful improvements in vision. Medical issues such as over-medication or an under active thyroid can also be easily adjusted.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

If all that checks out, you can ease the burden by being there to transport and engage that at-risk senior. Let them feel like life is worth living. Sure you may hear "I don't know why they call them the golden years," but at least you can make the transition a bit easier.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist who specialized in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and blade- free iLASIK.  Her colleagues at Lakeshore Eye Care are Dr. Mark German and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto.

To learn more about eye care topics, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


WHY WE DO WHAT WE DO By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, S.C. in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
January 21, 2013

What are all those questions, measurements and eye drops about when you come for an eye exam?  These are reasonable questions that most of us wonder about but rarely think to ask.  A complete eye exam is a thorough medical evaluation of your eyes and your vision.

We start with a comprehensive medical history because many medical conditions and medications can affect the eyes. Diabetes and high blood pressure are obvious but arthritic conditions, neurological problems and many other medical diagnoses can have an influence on the functioning of the eyes.  We then ask about any vision problems you may be having to get a sense of how your vision is affecting activities such as driving and reading.

The measuring comes in with determining your current glasses prescription and seeing if we can improve on that with a change - this is called refraction. We also check your pupils, eye movements, side vision and eye pressure.  All these factors are critical to being sure no problems such as glaucoma are present.

The reason for the dilating drops is to get a clear view of the back of your eye called the retina.  This is the only place in the body where we can directly view blood vessels which can be affected by diabetes and other problems. We also look for tears, tumors and evidence of macular degeneration.

Dr. Mark E. GermanSo each and every step is important at least every 1-2 years!

Dr. Mark German is and Optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto.

For more eye care information call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


4 REASONS for LASIK by Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
January 15, 2013

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

I'll bet you've been thinking about LASIK for years but just never quite got over the fear factor.  These 4 words that could change all that: Experience, Comfort, Precision and Affordability!

As for experience, you could not do better than selecting me as your LASIK surgeon as I was the very first doctor in the Milwaukee area to perform refractive surgery with a laser. Since then I have consistently been offering the latest technology in refractive surgery available anywhere, right here in Ozaukee County. Comfort comes with a pain-free LASIK procedure lasting less than 20 minutes. In fact the first laser takes a mere 21 seconds and the second usually less than a minute.  Precision comes from using the safest and most precise laser technology available.  That leaves affordability. If you are 30 years old and wear contact lenses, you can expect to pay $20,000 over your lifetime for contacts and solutions.  That and our financing plan make LASIK a deal.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

I suppose we could add another word: confidence! By selecting Lakeshore Eye Care for your LASIK procedure you get the benefit of a local surgeon you can trust along with the most advanced LASIK procedure available.  Now your next step is to call 262-241-1919 to arrange your complimentary LASIK screening exam to see if blade-free iLASIK is in your future.  It's that easy.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin. For more eye care information or to schedule appointments, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


"FORGIVE" YOUR CO-PAYMENT? by Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
January 7, 2013

At the beginning of every year we get calls requesting that we "forgive" insurance co-payments.  Some ask nicely, others are pretty insistent.  Just to save our billing staff from another call on this subject, let me explain what co-payments are and how they function as part of your health insurance plan.

Co-payments are designed to share the cost of the visit with the patient.  Every time co-payments go up, the amount paid to the doctor directly by the insurance company goes down.

If we 'forgive" a co-payment, it is actually insurance fraud.  We have contracts with most major insurance companies stating what our compensation will be for specific examinations, testing and surgical procedures.  If the patient is required to pay 20% of that or a certain dollar amount and we "forgive' it, there are several consequences.

First, we are not receiving that portion of our fees that the co-payment represents.  Second, the fraud part is because the insurance company assumes the co-payment was made so reduces the patient's remaining deductible for the rest of the year.  Third, if this activity is reported to the insurance company we are essentially stating that our fees are less than the contracted amount.  This allows the insurance company to reduce our payments in the future for other patient's visits.

So as much as we would like to "forgive and forget", it is not so simple!

Dr. Josephine-Liezl P. Cueto

Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto

Dr. Cueto is a Physician and Surgeon (Ophthalmologist) specializing in medical and surgical eye care. She practices at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information or to schedule an appointment call 262-241-1919.

Visit www.Lakeshorevision.com  for more eye care information and to learn more about Lakeshore Eye Care and Dr. Cueto.


ED MEDICATIONS AND YOUR VISION By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
January 2, 2013

Medications such as Viagra, Cialis and Levitra are prescribed to treat ED (erectile dysfunction). Now this is a delicate topic but one that should be discussed with your eye care professional.

Color perception is commonly altered for several hours after using an ED medication. There appears to be a blue tint to your vision along with light sensitivity. This may make blue and green lights look similar and in fact pilots are not allowed to use these medications for 12 hours before flying.  This color change is nothing to worry about and does not persist.

A more serious potential vision problem is a small stroke behind one eye which could cause permanent vision loss in that eye.  Many thousands of patients have used these medications successfully but there have been 14 reported cases of a condition called anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) which is a blockage of blood flow behind the eye.  All those affected had other medical problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure or elevated cholesterol.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

So should you use ED medications?  If you have already had vision loss in one eye from AION you probably would not want to risk your remaining eye with ED drugs. Your eye doctor should also look at your optic nerve in the back of your eye.  It is like a saucer with an inside and outside part. Those with a very small inside part ("small cup") are at higher risk of vision loss with ED medications. So bring it up, we can help you make an informed decision.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician and Surgeon) practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin.

Call 262-241-1919 for more information or to schedule appointments.

Visit www.LakeshoreVision.com to learn more about your vision and your health.


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