Recent posts

‘I THINK I HAVE A RETINAL DETACHMENT” By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 15, 2018

If you experience an abrupt increase in floaters or start seeing flashing lights in your peripheral vision, you might immediately assume that you are experiencing a retinal detachment. While this may be the case, the only way to diagnose a retinal tear or detachment is with a thorough dilated eye examination with an eye care professional.  While it may seem tempting to go to an emergency room, they will most likely refer you to an ophthalmologist or optometrist. You can save time and money by calling us first.

When should you call? If you notice a significant increase in floaters, new onset of flashing lights in your peripheral vision and certainly if you notice some loss of side vision, call right away. If it is in the middle of the night, you can easily wait until the morning to call. If it on a weekend, we are available with an option to reach the on- call doctor on our answering machine. We generally recommend the examination be performed within 24 to 48 hours of the onset of symptoms.

The eye is filled with a gelatin-like material called vitreous.  Over time, it breaks down - becoming more liquid with small collagen particles casting a shadow on the retina.  The result is the appearance of small spots, squiggly lines, clouds or spider webs moving across your vision.  Flashes of light occur when the fluid shifts within the eye, tugging on the retina (the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye).

The reason it is important to diagnose a retinal detachment is that it may require laser treatment or even surgery to preserve you vision. Early detection is the key to optimal outcome from either procedure. Realize that we are here for you if need be.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery.  She welcomes patients of all ages and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 2620241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


ABOUT PUPILLARY DISTANCE (PD) By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care (Formally Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals) with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 8, 2018

Online purchasing of eyeglasses has become much more popular in the past few years. Many people are coming in to our office are asking for their “PD.” The PD (inter-pupillary distance) is the distance measured from the center of one pupil to the center of the other pupil. This measurement is done in millimeters with a ruler, a device called a pupilometer, or by using your computer/phone camera.

This measurement has been somewhat trivialized by the online glasses industry in recent years. The PD is a measurement that is crucial to making glasses correctly. This measurement is even more critical with strong glasses prescriptions. Optometrists and ophthalmologists are the doctors that prescribe the correct prescription to be put in the lenses. Opticians (professionals that fit and make eyeglasses) have always been the professionals that measure the PD. This leaves consumers and doctors trying to figure out who is responsible for the PD measurement when glasses are ordered online.

The PD needs to be measured differently according to the type of lenses that are being put in the frame. A different PD measurement will be done for progressive lenses, reading glasses, or distance glasses.

As online glasses sites are becoming more popular, they are offering consumers easier online tools to measure their own PD. At our office, since we do not make or sell eyeglasses, we generally advise people to use online tools at home to measure their own PD. If the prescription is strong, or if bifocals are being ordered, we still recommend seeking the professional help of local opticians to measure the PD correctly.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. Ivanoski is an Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


WHAT IS MYOPIA? By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 20, 2018

Myopia, or nearsightedness, is a common visual problem that affects about 25 million people in the U.S. alone.  It is an eye focusing disorder (not an eye disease) where things appear clear close-up but blurred far-away without glasses.  Those with myopia have a slightly longer eye than those without. Glasses act to bend the light rays so they focus on the back of the eye.  Although family history is a factor, it is not the only reason for myopia.

The largest study of childhood eye diseases ever undertaken found the incidence of myopia has doubled over the last 50 years among children in the U.S.  The Multi-Ethnic Pediatric Eye Disease Study (MEPEDS) looked at over 9,000 children and found a possible reason for the increase in nearsightedness: too much “screen time” and not enough sunlight or outdoor play.  This means that excessive use of mobile devices and close-up work with children may adversely affect their vision.  A prior study in 2008 followed children in Australia for 2 year and found that those who spent more time outdoors developed less myopia than their more shut-in counterparts.

Reading and screen time are certainly important for intellectual development but, as with most things in life, a good balance is indicated. Of course myopia is not a debilitating condition, it is managed with glasses, contact lenses or even LASIK when they are older.  But with outdoor activities you get a two-for-one: healthy eyes and bodies.

Worried about your children’s vision? Call for a complete eye examination and be assured they are seeing at their very best.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices Optometry at Madison Medical Eye Care (formally known as Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals). He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans in both the Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin offices.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


LET ME INTRODUCE YOU... By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 5, 2018

What really stands out about Madison Medical Eye Care is our amazing staff. Not a day goes by without someone commenting on how nice they are and how much they learned from them. From the first phone call, through your exams or surgeries and insurance billing, they have you covered.  Our doctors could not possibly get by without them and are very pleased that they have made an impression on you also.

Some especially important individuals who help facilitate your care are our Certified Ophthalmic Assistants and Technicians (COAs/COTs).  They work under our doctor’s direction and supervision to gather the pertinent information we need at each and every examination. They listen to your concerns and condense that information so we can effectively address them.  You leave with solutions for better vision and eye comfort.  Not only that but you learn a lot about how your eyes work too!

How did the technicians learn all this?  All of our COAs/COTs have completed an intense independent study course with clinical training that lasts at least two years.  They then have to pass either the COA or the COT level examinations. Furthermore, they participate in Continuing Medical Education courses every year to build their knowledge and skills with new technologies and developments.  Advances in medical and surgical eye care are constantly occurring and our techs make sure that they never get left behind.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Thank you techs, we could not do our job without you! And thank you kind patients for taking the time to complement them and other staff members on jobs well done.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WINTER IN WISCONSIN IS LASIK SEASON By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care (Formally Lakeshore Eye Care) with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
January 31, 2018

Winter in Wisconsin leaves us dreaming of our favorite summer activities that seem so far away: enjoying our lakes and pools, blasting out on that Harley, biking the Interurban trail and much more.  While you cannot make winter disappear, there is something you can do now to enhance your summer fun – improve your outlook on life with LASIK Vision Correction!  Winter is always our busiest time for LASIK because this is a procedure for active people, not couch potatoes.  Most prefer to take advantage of this down time to finally get free of their contacts and glasses.

We now exclusively utilize the all-laser Wavelight blade-free LASIK system.  They are the fastest lasers available in the US for refractive surgery and the most precise. The first laser, that makes the tiny flap on the surface of the eye, takes only 6 seconds.  The second laser, that contours the shape of your eyes to improve your vision, is also 50% quicker that the older technologies.  This means less time you need to stay still under the laser and quicker healing. The improvement in vision, especially for those with more extreme prescriptions, is quite evident.

Patients love the improved comfort and potential to see even better than they did with glasses or contacts. I appreciate the precise automation with the smallest laser spot size in the industry and fastest eye tracking system available:  20 times faster than natural eye movements!

Don’t just dream of summer, have LASIK now so when it does arrive you will be ready to fully embrace it.  Get started by calling for your complementary LASIK screening exam today to determine if LASIK is for you.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) with Madison Medical Eye Care.  She specializes in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She practices with Drs. Mark German & James Ivanoski with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


PRESBYOPIA By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care (Madison Medical Affiliates, Inc.) Formally known as Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. Offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
January 22, 2018

I will never forget when my mother informed me that her eye doctor told her that she had “prehistoric eyes.”  It took a moment for that to register, but I was able to figure out that her eye doctor probably said she had presbyopia.  So, what is presbyopia?

Presbyopia is when our eyes gradually lose the ability to focus on things up close.  It is a normal part of our aging process, and usually starts in our late 30’s or early 40’s.  This forces us to have to hold things farther away and have better light for reading.

Our eyes have a lens that is flexible and changes shape to change focus from far to near objects.  The lens inside the eye becomes less flexible as we age, and eventually we cannot change focus from distance to near. Currently, there is no way to stop the aging process to stop or reverse presbyopia.  Presbyopia can be addressed by using reading glasses, bifocals, contact lenses, or surgery.

There are some interesting new therapies under investigation to help presbyopia.  EV06 is an eye drop that is being investigated that could potentially halt or reverse lens hardening.  This medication is in the very early stages of clinical studies, and the results are promising, but long-term safety has yet to be determined.  Other eye drops like Liquid Vision and FOV Tears affect pupil size to trick our eyes to focus close easier are also being studied.

With new surgical techniques and medications on the horizon, we may be able to get rid of those pesky reading glasses or bifocals in the future.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices with Drs. Martha Jay and Mark German at Madison Medical Eye Care, now part of Madison Medical Affiliates. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


HOW LONG SHOULD I SCHEDULE FOR MY EYE EXAM? By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care - formally known as Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
January 15, 2018

A complete eye examination at Madison Medical Eye Care is a thorough medical evaluation of your eyes. It starts with a review of your medical and surgical history along with your current medications and any prior allergic reactions to medications. Your family medical history is also reviewed as many medical conditions affecting the eyes run in families.

We then move on to any specific problems you may be having with your vision and your eyes. We need to determine how long the problem has been bothering you, what makes it worse or better, how it impacts your daily activities and other important factors relating to your visual well-being.   Then we measure your current glasses and your vision with those glasses; check your eye movements, pupils and side vision; see if we can improve your vision with a different glasses prescription (refraction); and measure your eye pressure.

At that point drops are put in your eyes to open the pupils so our doctors can further evaluate the health of your eyes.  These drops take some time to work so that gives you a little break before the doctor comes in.  Our doctors then recheck your refraction, review the data gathered by the technicians, and view the eyes through the microscope (slit lamp) for cataracts or retinal problems like macular degeneration.

Dr. James Ivanoski

They then explain any problems you may have and formulate a plan for relief. If surgery is in order, the actual procedure is discussed along with the risks and benefits. That leaves plenty of time for your questions so you can fully understand your options.  How long should you schedule for your eye exam? All this takes time, generally at least 1 to 1-1/2 hours.  Your vision is precious; you don’t want us to miss anything by rushing.

Dr. James Ivanoski practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Mark German at Madison Medical Eye Care, formally known as Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


GET OFF THE COUCH AND SEE THE DIFFERENCE By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
January 12, 2018

Winter is upon us but don’t take that as an excuse to hibernate! Staying active has been shown in a recent study to decrease your chances of developing macular degeneration. Macular degeneration is an aging change affecting the back of your eye. It is the leading cause of legal blindness for those over age 65 years of age. Previously known risk factors include age, smoking, ultraviolet exposure (not wearing sunglasses) and a diet deficient in leafy green vegetables.

The recent study about physical activity and macular degeneration was published in the American Journal of Ophthalmology. The authors looked at scientific articles published through May of 2015 which, in total, involved almost 70,000 patients. The conclusion was that physical activity was protective against developing macular degeneration.  Those with a high level of exercise were at an 8% lower risk of developing mild or “dry” macular degeneration compared to their sedentary cohorts.  The difference was even greater for severe or “wet” macular degeneration. There was a 41% lower risk of developing this type of macular degeneration in the active patients compared to those with a low activity level.

Whether it is going for a walk, joining a gym, participating in a SilverSneakers program or whatever works for you – get off the couch and get moving! Not only will you potentially improve you vision but it will help you maintain a healthy weight, prevent muscle loss and even improve your mood.

While you are at it, don’t forget to treat your eyes to a complete eye examination at least every 1 to 2 years. If you have diabetes, we suggest yearly. If you have glaucoma, we normally recommend that we see you at least twice yearly.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with Drs. Mark German and James Ivanoski. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


LAKESHORE EYE CARE HAS JOINED MADISON MEDICAL AFFILIATES! By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
December 22, 2017

We are very pleased to announce that as of the first of the year, all the doctors and staff of Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, S.C. have joined Madison Medical Affiliates, Inc.!   Not to worry, very little will change as far as your patient experience is concerned.  We will remain in both our Mequon and Saukville offices, our phone numbers will be unchanged and, most importantly, we will continue to provide you with the most advanced medical and surgical eye care available.

Why did we make the change and why now? For more than 25 years we have maintained a very successful independent practice but the time seemed right to expand.  The trend in health care today is towards consolidation and we did not want to be left behind.

For over 100 years, the doctors at Madison Medical have been providing high quality health care in the Milwaukee area. They now have more than 50 physicians in 12 specialties and, with our addition, 8 locations.  Don’t make the mistake of thinking they have anything to do with Madison, Wisconsin however! The practice was started in Milwaukee by Dr. J.D. Madison in 1903 and he was later joined by his nephew, Fred Madison. The rest is history.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

All three of our doctors (Dr. Mark German, Dr. James Ivanoski and myself) are thrilled about our new association with this prestigious medical group. We are very grateful to you, our patients, for your tremendous support over the years and look forward to a great 2018 and beyond.  Remember that we still welcome patients of all ages into our practice and accept most insurance plans.  See you soon!

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


Have Cataract Surgery and Live Longer: New York Times article by Jane Brody

By user-admin
December 5, 2017

Click on the drawing on the left for a link to a New York Times article by Jane Brody about the wonders of cataract surgery, it can even prolong your life!


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