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GOOD NEWS FOR BABY BOMERS: TWO NEW STUDIES ABOUT MACULAR DEGENERATION By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 9, 2018

Two recent studies from the Journal of the American Medical Association/Ophthalmology are of interest to those worried about macular degeneration. The first concerns whether vitamin supplements are of use for those with a family history of macular degeneration but who have no evidence of the condition themselves. The second concerns the frequency of macular degeneration in the “Baby Boom” generation.

As far as the vitamins, it appears that they are of no use in those who do not actually have macular degeneration. That is consistent with the advice we have been giving for years: if you have a relative of macular degeneration you should incorporate leafy green vegetables into your diet on a regular basis, you should not smoke and you should wear sunglasses outside. The vitamins (knows as AREDS2) are of use for those who actually have evidence of macular degeneration.  They have been shown to decrease the progression from the mild “dry” to the more aggressive “wet” form.

The second article is good news for baby boomers! It appears the risk of developing macular degeneration has declined over the last three generation based on the longitudinal Beaver Dam (yes this is based on Wisconsinites!) study. Those born between 1901 and 1924 (“Greatest Generation”) had a 12% chance of developing macular degeneration, those born between 1925 and 1945 (“Silent Generation”) had a 4% chance and those born between 1946 and 1964 (“Baby Boom Generation”) only have a 1.5% risk of developing this debilitating visual condition.

Similar good news is out there for heart disease and dementia. So keep the healthy diet and lifestyle changes that we now know are important to our wellbeing and hopefully you will enjoy good vision for years to come.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified Ophthalmologist practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. She specializes in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


IS YOUR EYE PROBLEM AN EMERGENCY? By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 2, 2018

Most people come to the eye doctor for routine care to monitor ocular health or to get a new spectacle or contact lens prescription.  What types of symptoms constitute an ocular emergency that should be seen as soon as possible?

Sudden vision loss or decreased vision in one or both eyes is an ocular emergency.  Loss of vision can include:  a total blacking out of vision, missing a chunk of vision (like the entire right side being gone), having a curtain come across the vision, and sudden blurred vision that is not going away.  Any sudden loss of vision has to be evaluated to see what is causing it, and if it requires treatment or referral to a specialist.

Sudden constant double vision has to be evaluated sooner rather than later.  Seeing sudden horizontal or vertical double vision may be a sign of uncontrolled diabetes, high blood pressure, multiple sclerosis, or other conditions that affect the brain.

Ocular trauma should always be seen as soon as possible.  Any chemicals that get in the eye should be rinsed out copiously with water for 15-30 min. before going to the eye doctor.  Injuries that cause a lot of eye pain, light sensitivity, double vision, or decreased vision should be evaluated right away.

Red eyes that are causing a lot of pain, light sensitivity or decreased vision should be seen quickly.  Some eye infections or ocular inflammation can cause permanent vision loss if not treated promptly.

Our staff is very good at knowing what symptoms prompt the need for somebody to be seen urgently.  Give us a call if you have any doubts about whether you eye problem is an emergency.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an optometrist practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


FORGOT YOUR READING GLASSES AT THE CEDARBURG LIBRARY?

By user-admin
March 30, 2018

If that is the case, the Cedarburg Friends of the Library have you covered! Find a basket of reading glasses on each floor near the automated check-out stations. The above information is thanks to the News Graphic (3/29/18).


BASEBALL VS FOOTBALL EYES By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 29, 2018

Brewers Fans know that the season has begun!  What they may not know is that baseball is not just a sport but also a way to explain the shape of your eyes.  You have “football eyes” if the front of your eyes are curved like a football. This is called astigmatism.  You have “baseball eyes” if the front of your eyes are more rounded like a baseball.

It is important to know if you have “football” or “baseball” eyes if you are considering cataract surgery.  The differences between the two determine which implant options are available to you at the time of surgery.  Cataract surgery is a very safe and relatively easy procedure to go through.  We gently remove your natural cloudy lens and replace it with a clear implant to improve your vision.

The latest advancements in cataract surgery allow us to take advantage of more implant choices than previously available. If you have football eyes, you would see better afterwards if we place a Toric implant at the time of your cataract surgery.  If you have baseball eyes, then you could benefit from a Multi-focal implant that allows you to see far away, intermediate and close up after your surgery without glasses.  These bifocal-like implants let you turn back the clock and be relatively free of glasses after your procedure.

How can you tell if you have football or baseball eyes?  How do you know which implant is best for you at the time of your cataract surgery?  We will guide you through your available options during your cataract evaluation.  Remember, you only have cataract surgery once so it is important to consider all the possibilities.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisionMedicalEyeCare.com.


‘I THINK I HAVE A RETINAL DETACHMENT” By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 15, 2018

If you experience an abrupt increase in floaters or start seeing flashing lights in your peripheral vision, you might immediately assume that you are experiencing a retinal detachment. While this may be the case, the only way to diagnose a retinal tear or detachment is with a thorough dilated eye examination with an eye care professional.  While it may seem tempting to go to an emergency room, they will most likely refer you to an ophthalmologist or optometrist. You can save time and money by calling us first.

When should you call? If you notice a significant increase in floaters, new onset of flashing lights in your peripheral vision and certainly if you notice some loss of side vision, call right away. If it is in the middle of the night, you can easily wait until the morning to call. If it on a weekend, we are available with an option to reach the on- call doctor on our answering machine. We generally recommend the examination be performed within 24 to 48 hours of the onset of symptoms.

The eye is filled with a gelatin-like material called vitreous.  Over time, it breaks down - becoming more liquid with small collagen particles casting a shadow on the retina.  The result is the appearance of small spots, squiggly lines, clouds or spider webs moving across your vision.  Flashes of light occur when the fluid shifts within the eye, tugging on the retina (the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye).

The reason it is important to diagnose a retinal detachment is that it may require laser treatment or even surgery to preserve you vision. Early detection is the key to optimal outcome from either procedure. Realize that we are here for you if need be.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery.  She welcomes patients of all ages and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 2620241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


ABOUT PUPILLARY DISTANCE (PD) By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care (Formally Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals) with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 8, 2018

Online purchasing of eyeglasses has become much more popular in the past few years. Many people are coming in to our office are asking for their “PD.” The PD (inter-pupillary distance) is the distance measured from the center of one pupil to the center of the other pupil. This measurement is done in millimeters with a ruler, a device called a pupilometer, or by using your computer/phone camera.

This measurement has been somewhat trivialized by the online glasses industry in recent years. The PD is a measurement that is crucial to making glasses correctly. This measurement is even more critical with strong glasses prescriptions. Optometrists and ophthalmologists are the doctors that prescribe the correct prescription to be put in the lenses. Opticians (professionals that fit and make eyeglasses) have always been the professionals that measure the PD. This leaves consumers and doctors trying to figure out who is responsible for the PD measurement when glasses are ordered online.

The PD needs to be measured differently according to the type of lenses that are being put in the frame. A different PD measurement will be done for progressive lenses, reading glasses, or distance glasses.

As online glasses sites are becoming more popular, they are offering consumers easier online tools to measure their own PD. At our office, since we do not make or sell eyeglasses, we generally advise people to use online tools at home to measure their own PD. If the prescription is strong, or if bifocals are being ordered, we still recommend seeking the professional help of local opticians to measure the PD correctly.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. Ivanoski is an Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


WHAT IS MYOPIA? By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 20, 2018

Myopia, or nearsightedness, is a common visual problem that affects about 25 million people in the U.S. alone.  It is an eye focusing disorder (not an eye disease) where things appear clear close-up but blurred far-away without glasses.  Those with myopia have a slightly longer eye than those without. Glasses act to bend the light rays so they focus on the back of the eye.  Although family history is a factor, it is not the only reason for myopia.

The largest study of childhood eye diseases ever undertaken found the incidence of myopia has doubled over the last 50 years among children in the U.S.  The Multi-Ethnic Pediatric Eye Disease Study (MEPEDS) looked at over 9,000 children and found a possible reason for the increase in nearsightedness: too much “screen time” and not enough sunlight or outdoor play.  This means that excessive use of mobile devices and close-up work with children may adversely affect their vision.  A prior study in 2008 followed children in Australia for 2 year and found that those who spent more time outdoors developed less myopia than their more shut-in counterparts.

Reading and screen time are certainly important for intellectual development but, as with most things in life, a good balance is indicated. Of course myopia is not a debilitating condition, it is managed with glasses, contact lenses or even LASIK when they are older.  But with outdoor activities you get a two-for-one: healthy eyes and bodies.

Worried about your children’s vision? Call for a complete eye examination and be assured they are seeing at their very best.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices Optometry at Madison Medical Eye Care (formally known as Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals). He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans in both the Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin offices.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


LET ME INTRODUCE YOU... By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 5, 2018

What really stands out about Madison Medical Eye Care is our amazing staff. Not a day goes by without someone commenting on how nice they are and how much they learned from them. From the first phone call, through your exams or surgeries and insurance billing, they have you covered.  Our doctors could not possibly get by without them and are very pleased that they have made an impression on you also.

Some especially important individuals who help facilitate your care are our Certified Ophthalmic Assistants and Technicians (COAs/COTs).  They work under our doctor’s direction and supervision to gather the pertinent information we need at each and every examination. They listen to your concerns and condense that information so we can effectively address them.  You leave with solutions for better vision and eye comfort.  Not only that but you learn a lot about how your eyes work too!

How did the technicians learn all this?  All of our COAs/COTs have completed an intense independent study course with clinical training that lasts at least two years.  They then have to pass either the COA or the COT level examinations. Furthermore, they participate in Continuing Medical Education courses every year to build their knowledge and skills with new technologies and developments.  Advances in medical and surgical eye care are constantly occurring and our techs make sure that they never get left behind.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Thank you techs, we could not do our job without you! And thank you kind patients for taking the time to complement them and other staff members on jobs well done.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WINTER IN WISCONSIN IS LASIK SEASON By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care (Formally Lakeshore Eye Care) with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
January 31, 2018

Winter in Wisconsin leaves us dreaming of our favorite summer activities that seem so far away: enjoying our lakes and pools, blasting out on that Harley, biking the Interurban trail and much more.  While you cannot make winter disappear, there is something you can do now to enhance your summer fun – improve your outlook on life with LASIK Vision Correction!  Winter is always our busiest time for LASIK because this is a procedure for active people, not couch potatoes.  Most prefer to take advantage of this down time to finally get free of their contacts and glasses.

We now exclusively utilize the all-laser Wavelight blade-free LASIK system.  They are the fastest lasers available in the US for refractive surgery and the most precise. The first laser, that makes the tiny flap on the surface of the eye, takes only 6 seconds.  The second laser, that contours the shape of your eyes to improve your vision, is also 50% quicker that the older technologies.  This means less time you need to stay still under the laser and quicker healing. The improvement in vision, especially for those with more extreme prescriptions, is quite evident.

Patients love the improved comfort and potential to see even better than they did with glasses or contacts. I appreciate the precise automation with the smallest laser spot size in the industry and fastest eye tracking system available:  20 times faster than natural eye movements!

Don’t just dream of summer, have LASIK now so when it does arrive you will be ready to fully embrace it.  Get started by calling for your complementary LASIK screening exam today to determine if LASIK is for you.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) with Madison Medical Eye Care.  She specializes in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She practices with Drs. Mark German & James Ivanoski with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


PRESBYOPIA By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care (Madison Medical Affiliates, Inc.) Formally known as Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. Offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
January 22, 2018

I will never forget when my mother informed me that her eye doctor told her that she had “prehistoric eyes.”  It took a moment for that to register, but I was able to figure out that her eye doctor probably said she had presbyopia.  So, what is presbyopia?

Presbyopia is when our eyes gradually lose the ability to focus on things up close.  It is a normal part of our aging process, and usually starts in our late 30’s or early 40’s.  This forces us to have to hold things farther away and have better light for reading.

Our eyes have a lens that is flexible and changes shape to change focus from far to near objects.  The lens inside the eye becomes less flexible as we age, and eventually we cannot change focus from distance to near. Currently, there is no way to stop the aging process to stop or reverse presbyopia.  Presbyopia can be addressed by using reading glasses, bifocals, contact lenses, or surgery.

There are some interesting new therapies under investigation to help presbyopia.  EV06 is an eye drop that is being investigated that could potentially halt or reverse lens hardening.  This medication is in the very early stages of clinical studies, and the results are promising, but long-term safety has yet to be determined.  Other eye drops like Liquid Vision and FOV Tears affect pupil size to trick our eyes to focus close easier are also being studied.

With new surgical techniques and medications on the horizon, we may be able to get rid of those pesky reading glasses or bifocals in the future.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices with Drs. Martha Jay and Mark German at Madison Medical Eye Care, now part of Madison Medical Affiliates. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


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