Contacts Lens Options

HISTORY OF CONTACT LENSES By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 5, 2020

Contact lenses were first invented by a German glass blower, F.A. Muller, in 1887. Adolph E. Flick, a French physician, successfully fit the first glass contact lens on the human eye in 1888. Contact lenses evolved to become a mainstream vision correction device with the invention of PMMA hard plastic contact lenses by Kevin Tuohy, a California optician, in 1948. A giant breakthrough occurred in 1959 when Czech chemists Otto Wichterle and Drahoslav Lim invented hydrogel plastic. This new plastic product led to the first soft contact lens to be introduced by Bausch & Lomb in 1971.

Contact lenses are now used routinely to correct for vision problems just like glasses. Soft and gas permeable contacts are used for people that are nearsighted, farsighted, have astigmatism or need bifocal correction.

Specialty contact lenses can be used to help medical problems of the eye as well. Gas permeable (hard) contact lenses can be used to help people that have irregular corneas. Larger gas permeable contacts, called scleral lenses, can be used to help conditions like severe dry eye or contact lens intolerance. Contact lenses can be even used as a bandage for corneal abrasions.

Future applications for contact lenses may include drug delivery systems for eye diseases like glaucoma. Microchips may be implanted in contacts to monitor eye health conditions or even transmit video directly to the eye. The future is quite bright for these little pieces of plastic invented over a hundred years ago! Interested in contact lenses? Call for an appointment and we will determine the best option is for you.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices comprehensive optometry at Madison Medical Eye Care. He particularly welcomes hard-to-fit contact lens patients and accepts most insurance plans.  For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


SWIMMING AND CONTACT LENSES By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 1, 2019

You can’t see without your glasses so why not swim in your contact lenses?  The “why not” has to do with safety: swimming in contact lenses significantly increases your risk of developing eye problems that range from mild to quite severe. Most contact lenses are at least 50% water.  This means that chlorinated water penetrates your contacts and stays in contact with the surface of your eye for up to an hour after swimming.  The result is an irritation to the surface of your eye and an increased risk of infection.

While a mild eye irritation may go away in a day or so, a severe eye infection can result in permanent vision loss.  Even in the best maintained pool or spa, bacteria can be present.  In lake water, a severe pathogen called acanthamoeba may be present that causes a difficult to treat corneal ulcer.  This protozoa penetrates the cornea rapidly and often requires specially formulated eye drops to save the eye.  Beaches may also present the possibility of a fusarium fungal infection.

Those glasses may be bulky but they are your better choice over contacts in the water.  Another alternative is LASIK vision correction.  With LASIK you can free yourself of the hassles of glasses in the water and still safely enjoy the outdoors.  LASIK is actually safer than contact lenses on dry land too!  Our Dr. Martha Jay is a leader in blade-free LASIK vision correction so one call to our office is all you need to get started on improving your vision safely.

Call for a free LASIK screening exam today, you won’t regret it. In the meantime, don’t wear those contacts in the water!

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices with Dr. Martha Jay and soon with Dr. Lisa Bennett at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He specializes in comprehensive eye care for the whole family, including contact lens fitting.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


CONTACT LENS RECYCLING By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
November 8, 2018

Most contact lens wearers wear disposable soft contact lenses.  Disposable contact lenses are usually replaced every day, every 2 weeks, or every month.  The contact lenses are made from plastic.  They are packaged in a plastic container with a foil top.  Each contact lens wearer could go through up to 365 contact lenses per year.  This produces a lot of recyclable waste.

A recent study has indicated that there are large amounts of soft contact lenses that end up in wastewater treatment plants.  This means that they are being washed down the drain or flushed in toilets.  Soft contact lenses do not easily biodegrade in a short amount of time, and are transported from wastewater treatment plants to landfills at an estimated 44,000 pounds per year in the U.S.  This does not account for the mass of packaging from soft contact lenses that is disposed of every year.

Due to the small size of contact lenses and their packaging, regular recycling programs do not tend to work.  These small items are often sorted out and sent to a landfill at recycling centers.  There is currently research being done by contact manufacturers to come up with biodegradable contacts and packaging.

The free One by One program sponsored by Bausch and Lomb in partnership with TerraCycle (a recycling company) is a great way to recycle your contacts and contact lens packaging.  It is free to sign up online and easy to do.  Please do not wash contacts down sinks or flush them.  Let’s be good stewards of our environment and keep the plastic from these great vision devices out of landfills.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices with Dr. Martha Jay at Madison Medical Eye Care (formally know as Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals). He specializes in comprehensive eye care for the whole family and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information on such topics as LASIK vision correction, small incision cataract surgery, contact lens care, macular degeneration, dry eyes, glaucoma and more, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


HOW TO STAY OUT OF TROUBLE WITH YOUR CONTACTS By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 24, 2018

Contact lenses are a great alternative to glasses for sports and everyday wear. You can avoid fogged up glasses, expand your peripheral or side vision, wear off-the-rack sunglasses or non-prescription sports goggles, and avoid the annoying “slide down the nose” syndrome.  Contacts, however, do take a bit more care than just throwing on a pair of glasses each morning.

Staying out of trouble with contacts starts with being sure you have an accurate fit and prescription by having a complete eye exam every one to two years. If your eyes hurt, become red or your vision changes suddenly then an emergent appointment is indicated as something more serious may be occurring.

As for daily care, start by making sure that your lens case is very clean. Wash it out daily and let it air dry in a clean place. Change the solutions every day. Be sure you are not just using saline to clean your contacts.  You need a product that disinfects as well as cleans the contacts to prevent eye infections.  In addition, discard the contacts according to the schedule advised by your eye doctor. Finally, NEVER sleep in your contacts as this greatly increases your risk of developing a severe infection called a corneal ulcer.

Dr. James Ivanoski

If your goal is to wake up with clear vision in the morning and avoid taking the time to properly care for your contacts, then you might want to consider seeing my colleague Dr. Martha Jay about LASIK vision correction. As for avoiding problems such as infections and injuries, you may be surprised to learn that we see far more problems in contact lens patients than in those who have had LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


CLEANING & DISINFECTING CONTACT LENSES By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 24, 2018

August 20-24 was the Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) fifth annual contact lens health week.  Contact lenses provide an excellent option to allow for clear vision.  Most contacts, however, do require cleaning and disinfection to keep your eyes healthy.

The first step for good contact lens care is to handle contacts with clean hands.  Try to avoid moisturizing soaps as the moisturizer can stick to contacts.  Rinse the hands thoroughly after washing and dry with a lint free towel.

Cleaning the contact lens after removal is important.  Every time a contact lens is inserted into the eye it develops some buildup.  It is recommended to put a few drops of multipurpose cleaner/disinfectant on a contact lens and then rub it in the palm of your hand gently for a few seconds.  This is recommended even with “No Rub” solutions.  This removes the daily dirt and debris from the contact lens.  Next rinse the contact with saline or multipurpose solution to remove the loose debris.

Contact lenses have to be stored in a contact lens case with contact lens disinfectant when they are not on the eye.  It is important to replace the solution daily and keep the case clean.  This kills the bacteria and other microorganisms that stick to the contact lens after it has been worn on the eye.  Disinfection storage time varies from product to product, but is usually at least 6 hours.

There are many types of contact lens disinfection solutions on the market.  Your eye doctor will recommend the appropriate one for your type of contacts.  Keeping the contacts clean and disinfected can make wearing contacts comfortable and maintain you eye health.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an Optometrist practicing with Dr. Martha Jay at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. He specializes in comprehensive eye examinations and contact lens fitting, especially for those hard to fit patients or those new to contact lenses.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


TOP 10 CONTACT LENS DO’S AND DON’TS By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 6, 2017
  1. Do not wear them when your eyes are red or irritated.  Wearing contacts with irritated eyes will most likely make things worse.
  2. Try not to swim with them in.  Wearing contacts while swimming can make it easier to get an eye infection or have irritation from chlorine.
  3. Take them out every night unless you are told that it is ok to sleep with them in by your eye doctor.  Leaving contacts in overnight increases likelihood for infection.
  4. Replace your disinfecting solution in the case daily.
  5. Rinse your contact lens case with hot water, let it air dry daily, and thoroughly clean your contact lens case weekly.
  6. Replace your contact lens case quarterly.  Serious eye infections can result from old dirty contact lens cases.
  7. Replace soft disposable contact lenses on a schedule prescribed by your eye doctor.  Wearing older dirty contacts increases risk of infection or inflammation.
  8. Get an eye exam yearly.  The eye health has to be assessed to make sure the contact lens is not causing any problems.
  9. Never store them in tap water.
  10. 10.  Always handle the contacts with clean hands.

Most of the time contact lenses provide excellent vision, and if they are worn like your eye doctor prescribed should provide a healthy alternative to glasses.

 

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an Optometrist practicing with Drs. Martha Jay and Mark German at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


ASTIGMATISM EXPLAINED By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 28, 2017

Astigmatism refers to the curvature of the surface of your eye.  If your eye is round like a baseball, you do not have astigmatism and can quit reading now!  But if the front of your eye has a curvature, making it shaped more like a football than a baseball, then you have astigmatism.

Generally patients don’t realize they have astigmatism.  We may mention it when we determine your glasses prescription but often we just write the prescription to compensate for it.

Serious discussions of astigmatism generally start when a patient is considering cataract surgery, LASIK vision correction or contact lenses.  There are special Toric contacts available for those with astigmatism and often they work quite well.  Many, however, find that toric contacts don’t provide consistent vision as they tend to rotate on the eye with blinking.

There is a common misconception that you cannot have LASIK if you have astigmatism but this is absolutely not true.  In fact this is actually a frequent reason for patients to elect to have LASIK as they are unhappy with their vision in glasses or contact lenses.

If you have astigmatism and cataracts, we can insert Toric implants at the time of surgery to improve your vision. More recently, Bifocal Toric implants have become available, now making bifocal implants an option for those with astigmatism.

Still confused?  Call for a complete eye examination and we will determine if you have significant astigmatism and how best to compensate for it.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


LASIK OR CONTACTS: WHICH IS SAFER? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 25, 2017

If you don’t like glasses, your alternatives include contact lenses or LASIK vision correction. We know that LASIK is more convenient and saves you money in the long run but which is the safer alternative? You’ll be surprised to learn that that actually LASIK is safer than wearing contact lenses. As a comprehensive ophthalmologist, I treat all types of eye problems. It is much more common for a contact lens wearer to come in with a severe eye problem than someone who has had LASIK.

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Up to 6% of contact lens wearers per year experience a severe eye infection, worsening dry eye symptoms or even an allergy to contact lenses themselves. These and other problems are not only painful but can lead to permanent vision loss and an inability to resume contact use or have LASIK in the future.

As LASIK safety is not the same everywhere you go, select your LASIK surgeon carefully.  All my patients benefit from blade-free LASIK using two lasers instead of one.  It is almost impossible to have a complication during this type of LASIK procedure. That’s why we call it “LASIK for Chickens.”

If you have been thinking about LASIK, consider your odds of a problem if you stay in contacts. You knew that LASIK simplifies your life and is more cost effective; now add safety to the list favoring LASIK.  Give us 20 minutes and we can turn those contacts into a distant memory.

While taking the blade out of the LASIK equation allows more patients to be good candidates, there still are exceptions. To see if LASIK is an option for you, call for your personalized screening exam.  It’s complimentary and pressure-free.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist who has been a leader in refractive surgery in the Milwaukee area for more than 20 years. She was the first doctor in the area to use a laser for vision correction and has continuously offered the most advanced eye care available.  She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


27 CONTACT LENSES FOUND IN PATIENT'S EYE: NEW YORK TIMES ARTICLS

By user-admin
July 28, 2017

Click on the image to the left for a link to an New York Times article about a patient in England who kept putting contact lenses in her eye not realizing she had not taken the last one out. She came in when here eyes were irritated and 27 contact lenses were found.


TOP 10 CONTACT LENS DO'S AND DON'TS By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 25, 2016

TOP 10 CONTACT LENS DO’S AND DON’TS

  1. Do not wear them when your eyes are red or irritated.  Wearing contacts with irritated eyes will most likely make things worse.
  2. Try not to swim with them in.  Wearing contacts while swimming can make it easier to get an eye infection or have irritation from chlorine.
  3. Take them out every night unless you are told that it is ok to sleep with them in by your eye doctor.  Leaving contacts in overnight increases likelihood for infection.
  4. Replace your disinfecting solution in the case daily.
  5. Rinse your contact lens case with hot water, let it air dry daily, and thoroughly clean your contact lens case weekly.
  6. Replace your contact lens case quarterly.  Serious eye infections can result from old dirty contact lens cases.
  7. Replace soft disposable contact lenses on a schedule prescribed by your eye doctor.  Wearing older dirty contacts increases risk of infection or inflammation.
  8. Get an eye exam yearly.  The eye health has to be assessed to make sure the contact lens is not causing any problems.
  9. Never store them in tap water.

10.  Always handle the contacts with clean hands.

Most of the time contact lenses provide excellent vision, and if they are worn like your eye doctor prescribed should provide a healthy alternative to glasses.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. Ivanoski practices comprehensive Optometry at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


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