Contacts Lens Options

HOW TO STAY OUT OF TROUBLE WITH YOUR CONTACTS By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 3, 2016

Contact lenses are a great alternative to glasses for sports and everyday wear. You can avoid fogged up glasses, expand your peripheral or side vision, wear off-the-rack sunglasses or non-prescription sports goggles, and avoid the annoying “slide down the nose” syndrome.  Contacts, however, do take a bit more care than just throwing on a pair of glasses each morning.

Staying out of trouble with contacts starts with being sure you have an accurate fit and prescription by having a complete eye exam every one to two years. If your eyes hurt, become red or your vision changes suddenly then an emergent appointment is indicated as something more serious may be occurring.

As for daily care, start by making sure that your lens case is very clean. Wash it out daily and let it air dry in a clean place. Change the solutions every day. Be sure you are not just using saline to clean your contacts.  You need a product that disinfects as well as cleans the contacts to prevent eye infections.  In addition, discard the contacts according to the schedule advised by your eye doctor. Finally, NEVER sleep in your contacts as this greatly increases your risk of developing a severe infection called a corneal ulcer.

Dr. Mark E. GermanIf your goal is to wake up with clear vision in the morning and avoid taking the time to properly care for your contacts, then you might want to consider seeing my colleague Dr. Martha Jay about LASIK vision correction. As for avoiding problems such as infections and injuries, you may be surprised to learn that we see far more problems in contact lens patients than in those who have had LASIK.

Dr. Mark German specializes in hard-to-fit contact lens patients and comprehensive eye care for all ages. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


SWIMMING AND CONTACT LENSES, OH NO! By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 24, 2016

You can’t see without your glasses so why not swim in your contact lenses?  The “why not” has to do with safety: swimming in contact lenses significantly increases your risk of developing eye problems that range from mild to quite severe. Most contact lenses are at least 50% water.  This means that chlorinated water penetrates your contacts and stays in on the surface of your eye for up to an hour after swimming.  The result is an irritation to the surface of your eye and an increased risk of infection.

While a mild eye irritation may go away in a day or so, a severe eye infection can result in permanent vision loss.  Even in the best maintained pool or spa, bacteria can be present.  In lake water, a severe pathogen called acanthamoeba may be present that causes a difficult to treat corneal ulcer.  This protozoa penetrates the cornea rapidly and often requires specially formulated eye drops to save the eye.  Beaches may also present the possibility of a fusarium fungal infection.

Those glasses may be bulky but they are your better choice over contacts in the water.  If you really want to see well in the water without glasses, however, it may be time to consider LASIK vision correction.  With LASIK you can free yourself of the hassles of glasses and still safely enjoy the outdoors.  LASIK is actually safer than contact lenses on dry land too!  As you know, our Dr. Martha Jay is a leader in blade-free LASIK vision correction.

LASIK screening exams are free, just give us a call. In the meantime, don’t wear those contacts in the water!

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


WHY DON’T OUR SURGEONS FIT CONTACT LENSES? By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 2, 2016

At Lakeshore Eye Care, we have two types of eye doctors: Ophthalmologists (Dr. Martha Jay) and Optometrists (myself).  While all three of us take care of your eyes, the ophthalmologists are surgeons. They concentrate on medical and surgical problems of the eyes such as cataract surgery, LASIK vision correction, glaucoma and other conditions. They rarely see patients who don’t have a medical or surgical problem with their eyes.

My practice, in contrast, is more skewed towards those with healthy eyes such as those who need their glasses or contact lenses checked. While an eye exam with me is just a thorough as with the ophthalmologists, I am more likely screening for eye problems rather than treating those with serious pathology.

So that comes to the big question: Why don’t the ophthalmologists fit contact lenses?  Contact lenses change all the time and I am the one who stays on top of these new developments. There are new contact lenses for dry eyes, astigmatism and reading introduced all the time. That leaves the ophthalmologists plenty of time to devote to staying on top of the advances in medical and surgical eye care.

The bottom line is that if you have healthy eyes and wear contact lenses, your best bet is to schedule with me so I can screen for more serious eye problems and provide you with the best contact lens options. Thinking of moving on to LASIK or have we decided that your cataracts are ready for surgery? Then that is another story and the ophthalmologists will take it from there.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages to his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


DON'T SLEEP IN YOUR CONTACTS! By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices easily accessible to Cedarburg, Grafton and other Ozaukee County Communities

By editor
September 16, 2015

See the link below to find out how sleeping in contact lenses led to disastrous consequences for one patient:

DON'T SLEEP IN CONTACTS!


HOW TO AVOID TROUBLE WITH CONTACTS By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
September 18, 2014

Contact lenses are a great alternative to glasses for sports and everyday wear. You can avoid fogged up glasses, expand your peripheral or side vision, wear off-the-rack sunglasses or non-prescription sports goggles, and avoid the annoying “slide down the nose” syndrome.  Contacts, however, do take a bit more care than just throwing on a pair of glasses each morning.

Staying out of trouble with contacts starts with being sure you have an accurate fit and prescription by having a complete eye exam every one to two years. If your eyes hurt, become red or your vision changes suddenly then an emergent appointment is indicated as something more serious may be occurring.

As for daily care, start by making sure that your lens case is very clean. Wash it out daily and let it air dry in a clean place. Change the solutions every day. Be sure you are not just using saline to clean your contacts.  You need a product that disinfects as well as cleans the contacts to prevent eye infections.  In addition, discard the contacts according to the schedule advised by your eye doctor. Finally, NEVER sleep in your contacts as this greatly increases your risk of developing a severe infection called a corneal ulcer.

Dr. Mark E. GermanIf your goal is to wake up with clear vision in the morning and avoid taking the time to properly care for your contacts, then you might want to consider seeing my colleague Dr. Martha Jay about LASIK vision correction. As for avoiding problems such as infections and injuries, you may be surprised to learn that we see far more problems in contact lens patients than in those who have had LASIK.

Dr. Mark German is an Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He specializes in first time contact lens fits and those with challenges such as astigmatism or exploring bifocal contact lens options. For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


LASIK OR CONTACTS: WHICH IS SAFER? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
April 29, 2014

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

If you don’t like glasses, your other options are contact lenses or LASIK vision correction. Which is the safer alternative? You’ll be surprised to learn that that actually LASIK is safer than wearing contact lenses. As a comprehensive ophthalmologist, I treat all types of eye problems. It is much more common for a contact lens wearer to come in with a severe eye problem than someone who has had LASIK.

Up to 6% of contact lens wearers per year will experience a severe eye infection, worsening dry eye symptoms or even an allergy to contact lenses themselves. These and other problems are not only painful but can lead to permanent vision loss and an inability to resume contact use.

LASIK safety, however, is not the same everywhere you go. All my patients benefit from blade-free LASIK using two lasers instead of one. It is almost impossible to have a complication during this type of LASIK procedure. Unusual healing is also rare, occurring less than 0.1% of the time. That’s why we call it “LASIK for Chickens.”

If you have been afraid of LASIK in the past, consider your odds of a problem if you stay in contacts. You knew that LASIK would simplify your life and save you money in the long run, and now you can add safety to the list of reasons to have LASIK. All it takes is 20 minutes to turn those contacts into a distant memory.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

While taking the blade out of the LASIK equation allows more patients to be good candidates, there are still exceptions. To find out if LASIK is an option for you, call for your personalized screening exam. It’s free, informative and pressure-free.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalm0logist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in LASIK vision correction, cataract surgery and comprehensive eye care. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 2620241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


GIANT PAPILLARY CONJUNCTIVITIS (GPC) By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
September 16, 2013

While it sounds like quite a mouthful, giant papillary conjunctivits (GPC) is a common eye condition. It's actually an allergy to contact lenses. It generally occurs in patients who have worn contact lenses for years. They come in concerned that their contacts are no longer comfortable and that they have a slight discharge from their eyes. "But I've worn contacts for years without problems" is their response when told of the diagnosis. It's precisely that long duration of wear that triggers the condition.

Patients with asthma, hay fever or animal allergies may be at greater risk of developing GPC. This condition is believed to be a reaction to protein deposits building up on the contact lenses. The name comes from what we see when we flip the upper eyelid: 1-2 mm bumps called "giant papillae".

The key to treatment is decreased lens wear time, frequent replacement of the contacts and diligent cleaning of the lenses each day. Disposable contacts help because they are discarded before the protein builds up. Sleeping in contacts has to stop. Besides the above, treatments may include allergy drops or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drops. Once the GPC clears up, the patient may want to consider LASIK vision correction to avoid a recurrence.

Are you having problems with your contact lenses? Or are you due for a thorough eye examination? We are here to help.

Dr. Mark E. German Dr. Mark German in an Optometrist practicing with Drs. Martha Jay and Josephine-Liezl Cueto at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin. This eye care team offers comprehensive eye care for all ages including contact lens fitting, LASIK vision correction, Cataract surgery, Glaucoma care, Age-related Macular degeneration care, Dry eye options, general eye care and much more.

To find out more about eye care and Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


YOU NEED CONTACT LENSES AND GLASSES by Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
July 17, 2013

You don’t need to have glasses if you wear contact lenses, right? WRONG! Actually, it isn’t healthy for your eyes to wear contacts from the time you wake up until the time you go to sleep every day. In order to fight off infection, your cornea (the clear front part of your eye) needs the extra oxygen exposure it can only get when you aren’t wearing your contact lenses. Not only is this a good reason to have a pair of glasses on hand, but also in the event of a complication such as a severe eye infection. When you have such a serious eye problem, you absolutely cannot wear contact lenses while you recover. Therefore, if you have no back-up glasses you have no way to see while you wait for the problem to improve.

The glasses prescription does not have to be perfect but should be close enough so you can see while driving and at work or school. Trying to determine your glasses prescription once a severe eye problem has occurred is difficult because your vision is blurred. Furthermore, you are then confronted with the problem of getting your glasses made in a hurry.

So if you cannot find your old glasses, next time you have an eye examination be sure to ask for a glasses prescription - even if you prefer to wear contact lenses. Simply put, it is just part of good eye care and you will certainly be glad you did so in the event of an eye problem. Other keys to healthy contact lens usage include making sure the contact lens case is very clean, not sleeping in the contacts, discarding the contacts as directed, and having a complete eye examination every 1-2 years.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin. For more eye care information call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


SWIMMING AND CONTACT LENSES By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
April 23, 2013

You can’t see without your glasses and love your contacts so why not swim in them? WRONG! You should never swim in contact lenses as doing so increases your risks of developing eye problems from mild irritation to severe eye infections. Most contact lenses are at least 50% water. This means that chlorinated water penetrates your contacts and stays in contact with the surface of your eye for up to an hour after swimming. The result is an irritation to the surface of your eye and an increased risk of infection.

While a mild eye irritation may go away in a day or so, a severe eye infection can result in permanent eye damage. Even in the best maintained pool or spa, bacteria can be present. In lake water, a severe pathogen called acanthamoeba may be present that causes a difficult to treat corneal ulcer. This protozoa penetrates the cornea rapidly and often requires specially formulated eye drops to save the eye. Beaches may also present the possibility of a fusarium fungal infection.

Dr. Mark E. German Those glasses may be bulky but they are your better choice over contacts in the water! Another alternative is LASIK vision correction. That way you can free yourself of the hassles of contact lenses and glasses and still enjoy the outdoors. As you know, our Dr. Martha Jay is a leader in blade-free LASIK vision correction. There is still time to have LASIK before summer, to get started call for your free LASIK screening exam. So enjoy a safe summer by either leaving those contacts out while swimming or stepping up to LASIK.

For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


“MONOVISION” WITH CONTACTS OR LASIK By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
April 8, 2013

Monowhat? Monovision is a way to avoid reading glasses for those who wear contact lenses or are considering LASIK Vision Correction.  What we do with monovision is maximize your distance vision in one eye and your near vision in the other.  Before you say: "That sounds crazy," let me explain further.

If you have reached your mid-forties you already understand that something is happening to your near vision.  You cannot see far-away and close-up with the same glasses.  If you are wearing contact lenses you may be starting to wear drug store reading glasses ("cheaters") over the contacts to read.  This is called presbyopia and is really unavoidable.

One way around the reading glasses is to weaken the contact lens power in your non-dominant eye to improve your reading vision.  This does not mean that you have to close one eye to see close and the other to see far-away.  You just look naturally with both eyes open and most people adjust quite well.  But not everyone likes monovision -  the only way to tell is to give it a try.

Dr. Mark E. GermanThe real advantage of monovison, whether with contacts or LASIK, is the ability to read without having to hunt down your "cheaters."  The disadvantage is a slight loss of depth perception.  So it is a trade-off.  Why not try it and see if it works for you and your lifestyle?

If you end up liking monovision in contacts then you might consider this for LASIK Vision Correction.  Endless possibilities!

Dr. Mark German is accepting patients of all ages into his practice.  His colleagues at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals are Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto.

For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


Stay Connected


We want to hear from you