Contacts Lens Options

PROBLEMS WITH CONTACT LENS SOLUTION by Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, S.C. in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By admin
October 8, 2012

If you wear soft contact lenses and use Opti-free "Replenish" contact lens solution, there may be a problem. We have been seeing a number of patients with mild, chronic eye infections who are using this product. You should switch to regular Opti-free "Pure Moist" or Bio true or RevitaLens for your multi-purpose solution.

The symptoms are a chronic red eye that keeps coming back after treatment. It may seem like an allergy or dry eyes. If changing solutions does not improve your comfort and the appearance of your eyes, please call for an appointment. Other tips to maintain healthy eyes while wearing contact lenses include being sure your case is clean, not over-wearing the contacts and changing the solutions daily.

Contacts add an extra stress to the health of your eyes and need to be cared for carefully. What we are trying to avoid is a severe infection such as an ulcer on the surface of the eye. Generally we only see ulcers on those who sleep in their contacts or in debilitated nursing home patients. You don't want to put yourself in that category!

Dr. Mark E. GermanSo please enjoy the great vision you get from contacts but take care of them correctly to maintain the health of your eyes.  And remember there is always the option of LASIK if you want to wake up with great vision. Our Dr. Martha Jay can help you with that.

To schedule an appointment or for more information, call 262-241-1919

Also visit www.LakeShoreVision.com to learn more about contact lens options and Dr. Mark German.


CONTACT LENSES AND GLASSES by Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals, Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By admin
July 16, 2012

If you wear contacts, you don’t need glasses right? WRONG!  First of all, it isn’t healthy for your eyes to wear contacts all waking hours. That’s because in order to fight off infection your cornea (the clear front part of your eye) needs the extra oxygen exposure this time away from contacts provides. But the more important reason to have glasses in addition to contacts is if you have an injury or severe eye infection.  When you have such a serious eye problem, you absolutely cannot wear contact lenses while you recover.  So if you have no back-up glasses you have no way to see while you wait for the problem to improve.

The glasses prescription does not have to be perfect but should be close enough so you can see to drive and go to work or school. Once you have a severe eye problem, that’s not a very good time to determine your glasses prescription as you vision is blurred.  Then there is the problem of getting the glasses made.  A one-hour optical shop often cannot make bifocals or may not be open at the time of your eye emergency.

Dr. Mark E. GermanSo if you cannot find your old glasses, next time you have an eye examination be sure to ask for a prescription for glasses even if you prefer to wear contact lenses.  It is just part of good eye care and you will certainly be glad you did so if you develop an eye problem. Other keys to healthy contact lens wearing include: Being sure the contact lens case is very clean; not sleeping in the contacts; discarding the contacts as directed; and having a complete eye examination every 1-2 years.

Dr. Mark German is an Optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He has 25 years experience treating eye problems for patients of all ages but especially enjoys the challenges of fitting contact lenses for people who have had problems in the past.

For more information about Dr. German, Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals and other eye care topics visit

www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


THE HERE AND WHY OF MONOVISION by Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By admin
April 30, 2012

Monowhat? Monvision is a way to avoid reading glasses for those who wear contact lenses or are considering LASIK Vision Correction.  What we do with monovision is maximize your distance vision in one eye and your near vision in the other.  Before you say: "That sounds crazy," let me explain further.

If you have reached your mid-forties you already understand that something is happening to your near vision.  You cannot see far-away and close-up with the same glasses.  If you are wearing contact lenses you may be starting to wear drug store reading glasses ("cheaters") over the contacts to read.  This is called presbyopia and is really unavoidable.

One way around the reading glasses is to weaken the contact lens in your non-dominant eye to improve your reading vision.  This does not mean that you have to close one eye to see close and the other to see far-away.  You just look naturally with both eyes open and most people adjust quite well.  But not everyone likes monovision -  the only way to tell is to try it.

Dr. Mark E. GermanThe real advantage of monovison, whether with contacts or LASIK, is the ability to read without having to hunt down your "cheaters."  The disadvantage is some loss of depth perception.  So it is a trade-off.  Why not try it and see if it works for you and your lifestyle?

If you end up liking monovision in contacts then you might consider this for LASIK Vision Correction.  Endless possibilities!

For more information about eye care, Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals and Dr. Mark German

visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919


SLEEP SAFELY: TAKE THOSE CONTACTS OUT FIRST! By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By admin
January 12, 2012

We are all busy people so it may seem logical to save time and trouble by sleeping in your contact lenses.  Some brands even promote this practice.  You may even have done it for years without problems but now is the time to stop.  You risk a severe corneal infection called a corneal ulcer.

The cornea is the clear front part of your eye.  It has no blood supply so must rely on the tear film for oxygen.  When you sleep in contacts not only are you depriving your eyes of oxygen by having your eyes closed, the plastic of the contacts act as an added barrier.  The result is a decreased ability to fight off infections and a possible corneal ulcer.

A corneal ulcer is a very painful penetrating infection on the surface of the eye. The symptoms are pain, blurred vision, redness and light sensitivity.  Once managed with strong antibiotic drops, they may leave a permanent scar on the surface of the eye. These types of infections are rarely seen in healthy people unless they sleep in their contact lenses.

Dr. Mark E. GermanIf you do not want to give up the ease of seeing well first thing in the morning, you might want to consider LASIK vision correction.  That way you can simplify your life even more by completely eliminating the contacts! Our Dr. Martha Jay is an expert blade-free LASIK surgeon, call to have a screening exam with her to see if LASIK is a possibility for you.

In the mean time, slow down – take those contacts our every night.  Your cornea will be much happier and so will you.

Dr. Mark German practices at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin.  For more eye care information visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis (GPC) by Dr. Mark German, Optometrist, Mequon, Wisconsin

By admin
October 5, 2011

Visualize This!

While it sounds like quite a mouthful, giant papillary conjunctivits (GPC) is a common eye condition.   It's actually an allergy to contact lenses.   It generally occurs in patients who have worn contact lenses for years.  They come in concerned that their contacts are no longer comfortable and that they have a slight discharge from their eyes.  "But I've worn contacts for years without problems" is their response when told of the diagnosis.  It's precisely that long duration of wear that triggers the condition.

Patients with asthma, hay fever or animal allergies may be at greater risk of developing GPC.  This condition is believed to be a reaction to protein deposits building up on the contact lenses.  The name comes from what we see when we flip the upper eyelid: 1-2 mm bumps called "giant papillae".

Dr. Mark E. GermanThe key to treatment is decreased lens wear time, frequent replacement of the contacts and diligent cleaning of the lenses each day.  Disposable contacts help because they are discarded before the protein builds up.  Sleeping in contacts has to stop.  Besides the above, treatments may include allergy drops or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drops.  Once the GPC clears up, the patient may want to consider LASIK vision correction to avoid a recurrence.

Are you having problems with your contact lenses?  Or are you due for a thorough eye examination?  We are here to help. Dr. Mark German is an Optometrist practicing with Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin.

Dr. German is accepting patients of all ages into his practice.  Most insurance plans honored.  Call 262-241-1919 for an appointment or more information.

Visit out web site at www.LakeShoreVision.com for more information.


Are Your Contact Lenses "Fit"? By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist in Wisconsin

By admin
September 12, 2011

Often I am asked at the end of an eye exam for a contact lens prescription.  Unlike a glasses prescription, a contact lens prescription requires an actual fitting of the contacts on the eye. As this is an extra service, it is not usually included in a regular eye examination.  An improperly fit contact lens can lead to serious eye problems such as corneal abrasions or even corneal ulcers.

What is involved in a contact lens fitting?  Several measurements are made of the cornea, or front part of your eye, to determine the appropriate size and the curvature for the contacts.  The optimal contact lens material is then chosen to provide the best possible comfort and vision.  The contact lens is then checked on the eye with a microscope to ensure a proper fit and optimal vision.

The next part of the contact lens fitting involves education. You could have the perfect contacts but if you are not caring for them correctly you could still get into serious trouble. The wearing schedule and cleaning regiment needs to be understood. For those new to contacts, learning how to put them in and take them out may take some time. You want to leave that appointment seeing well, understanding how to care for your contacts and realizing the warnings signs of trouble that would necessitate an immediate appointment.

Dr. Mark E. GermanMost people do very well with contact lenses but there is a tendency to not take the fitting and care seriously.   So call for your appointment today to be sure your contacts are "fit".

Dr. Mark German is an Optometrist practicing with Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin.  His colleagues are Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto, both Eye Physicians and Surgeons.

For an appointment or to learn more about contact lenses, call 262-241-1919.

Visit Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals Web site at www.LakeShoreVision.com.


WHAT’S NEW IN CONTACT LENSES by Dr. Mark German, Optometrist in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin

By admin
August 1, 2011

Are you less than enthusiastic about your current contact lenses?  If so it may be time to consider some of the newer contact lenses out there.  Common contact lens problems include inconsistent distance vision, discomfort especially towards the end of the day, more problems reading small print and difficulties handling the contacts.

One new contact is the Acuvue TruEye one-day contact lens.  This lens is easier to handle than other one-day contacts on the market and provides superior comfort.  It works well for distance vision and mono-vision for those of you over a certain age who need help with reading.  The problem with one-day contacts in the past has been that they were very thin so were a struggle to get in and dried out easily.

And Ciba has a new bifocal contact lens that has the advantage of improved comfort and comes in three reading powers.  This Air Optix has a central reading portion that provides more natural reading vision and excellent distance vision as well as improved comfort.  The drawback of many previous soft bifocal contacts has been that night vision was impaired due to the ring construction.

Dr. Mark E. GermanBut your contact lens problem could be dry eyes, the wrong prescription or astigmatism so there is not a one-size-fits-all approach to contact lens fitting.  Call us for an appointment so we can assess your needs and see if it is time to consider a change in your contacts.

From more information about contact lenses and eye care, visit our web site at www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919 for an appointment.

Dr. Mark German is an Optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin.  His colleagues at Lakeshore Eye Care are Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto who are Ophthalmologists or Eye Physicians and Surgeons.  They offer comprehensive medical and surgical eye care for patients of all ages.  Most insurance plans accepted.


SWIMMING AND CONTACT LENSES by Dr. Mark German, Milwaukee area Optometrist

By admin
July 11, 2011

swimmingYou can’t see without your glasses and love your contacts so why not swim in them?  WRONG! You should not swim in contact lenses as it increases your risk of eye problems from mild irritation to severe eye infections. Most contact lenses are at least 50% water.  So chlorinated water is going to penetrate your contacts and stay in contact with the surface of your eye for up to an hour after swimming.  This can irritate the surface of your eye and increase your risk of infection.

While mild eye irritation goes away in a day or so, a severe eye infection can result in permanent eye damage.  Even in the best maintained pool or spa, bacteria can be present.  In lake water, a severe pathogen called acanthamoeba may be present that causes a difficult to treat corneal ulcer.  This protozoa penetrates the cornea rapidly and often requires specially formulated eye drops to save the eye.  Beaches may also present the possibility of a fusarium fungal infection.

LASIK is so safe it is approved for Navy "Top Gun" fighter pilots

Those glasses may be bulky but they are your better choice over contacts in the water!  Another alternative is LASIK vision correction.  That way you can free yourself of the hassles of contact lenses and glasses while enjoying the outdoors.  Remember that our Dr. Martha Jay is a leader in blade-free LASIK vision correction, so safe and precise that it has been approved for Navy “Top Gun” pilots and astronauts.  Enjoy a safe summer - Call today for your free, no-pressure LASIK screening exam with Dr. Jay.

Dr. Mark German is an optometrist with Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin.  Both offices are easily accessible to Milwaukee, just off Highway 43.

Dr. German practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto.  They offer a full array of medical and surgical eye care options from general eye care to cataract surgery to blade-free LASIK Vision Correction.  Dr. German specializes in general eye care and hard-to-fit contact lens patients.

Dr. Mark E. GermanCall 262-241-1919 for an appointment.  Be sure to visit their web site at www.LakeShoreVision.com for more information about eye care and other blog entries.


WEAR CONTACTS? YOU ALSO NEED GLASSES! By Dr. Mark German, Milwaukee Area Optometrist

By admin
June 20, 2011

If you wear contact lenses, you don’t need glasses right? WRONG!  First of all, it isn’t healthy for your eyes to wear contact lenses all waking hours. That’s because your cornea (the clear front part of your eye) needs the extra oxygen exposure that the time away from contacts provides in order to fight off infections. But the more important reason to have glasses in addition to contacts is in the event that you have an injury or severe eye infection.  A frequent occurrence is the patient seen for a corneal ulcer or another painful eye condition who has no back-up glasses.  When you have such a serious eye problem, you absolutely cannot wear contact lenses.  That leaves those patients with no way to see while they wait for the problem to improve.

The glasses prescription does not have to be perfect but should be close enough to the appropriate one so you can drive and go to work or school. Once you have a severe eye problem, that’s not a very good time to determine your glasses prescription as you vision is blurred.  Then there is the problem of getting the glasses made.  A one-hour optical shop often cannot make bifocals or may not be open at the time of your eye emergency.

So if you cannot find your old glasses, next time you have an eye examination be sure to ask for a prescription for glasses even if you prefer to wear contact lenses.  It is just part of good eye care and you will certainly be glad you did so if you develop an eye problem. Other key points for contact lens wearers is be sure you contact lens case is very clean, not to sleep in the contacts, discard the contacts as directed, and to have a complete eye examination every 1-2 years.

Dr. Mark German is a Milwaukee Area Optometrist with offices in Ozaukee County: Mequon and Saukville.  He is part of the Eye Care Team at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals.  His other colleagues are Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto - both are Eye Physicians and Surgeons (Ophthalmologists).

Dr. Mark E. GermanLakeshore Eye Care Professionals provides a full array of eye care services including blade-free LASIK, cataract surgery with premium lens implants, glaucoma care, diabetic eye care, macular degeneration care, dry eye treatment and general eye examinations.

Dr. Mark German specializes in general eye care and contact lens fitting.  See our web site at www.LakeShoreVision.com for more information. Call 262-241-1919 for an appointment.


KIDS AND CONTACT LENSES by Dr. Mark German, Milwaukee Area Optometrist

By admin
May 2, 2011

How old should your son or daughter be to start contact lenses?  There is really no magic age when someone suddenly becomes responsible enough to handle contacts.  As a parent, you know your child best.  You should ask yourself if your child could be relied upon to clean the contacts each and every day; not to sleep in the contacts; to bring a case and solutions when away from home for the night; and, not insignificantly, could they learn to put them in and take them out.

Kids want contact lenses for a variety of reasons from just not liking the way they look in glasses to improving their sports performance.  But the idea should come from them.   Many find the hassles of contact lenses more than they can handle and would just as soon stay in glasses.

We specialize in first time fits of contacts so if you think your child is ready, we are here to help.   We start with a complete eye examination to be sure their eyes are healthy and to determine the appropriate prescription.  Then if we all agree that the child is ready to make the transition to contacts, we go the next step.  Most are fit with disposable contacts due to increased comfort and ease of care.

Your child’s vision is very precious so we want to be assured that they not only see well but that the health of their eyes is maintained with the proper contact lens fit and care.  While this may take some time with their first fitting, getting the right start should set them on the path to becoming a successful contact lens wearer for years to come.

Dr. Mark German is a Milwaukee area optometrist with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin.  He specializes in hard-to-fit contact lens wearers and first time contact lens patients along with general eye care.  Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals has two other doctors who are ophthalmologists: Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto.

Call 262-241-1919 for an appointment.

Visit their web site at www.LakeshoreVision.com


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