Dry Eye Syndrome

ANOTHER MASK ANNOYANCE: DRY EYES - Washington Post Article

By user-admin
September 10, 2020

Click on the photo to the left for a link to a Washington Post article about dry eyes and face masks.


SLEEP IMPROVES DRY EYES By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 13, 2019

Sleep problems affect many: either not being able to get to sleep, not being able to stay asleep, being sleepy during the day, and/or breathing problems such as sleep apnea during the night. They affect how you feel the next day and how productive you can be.  Dry eyes are an even more common annoyance. The symptoms of dry eyes generally include a sandy sensation or the feeling that there is something in your eyes.  Blurred near vision, especially towards the end of the day or with computer use, is also frequently noticed.  A new study has now linked the two.

Published in the medical journal Investigative Ophthalmology in May, a study out of Singapore found that insomnia, sleep apnea and reduced hours of sleep per night were all associated with an increase in the severity of dry eye symptoms.  They used a number of well-known questionnaires to assess the sleep patterns of over 3 thousand people and then obtained a detailed history of their dry eye symptoms. Most of the sleep issues noted above were associated with at least a 70% increase in dry eye symptoms.

Dr. James Ivanoski

What can you do about it? You can consult your primary care physician about further evaluation and treatment of your sleep issues. They can determine if further testing is indicated or if changes in your medications are recommended. In the mean time you can treat your dry eyes with artificial tears. If you are using the tears more than 4 times per day be sure to use the preservative-free type that come in individual vials so as not to cause more eye irritation. There are prescription medications for dry eyes if tears do not work. We can discuss those and other options at your next eye examination. Call for a sooner appointment if your symptoms of dry eyes are not improving.

Dr. Ivanoski is an optometrist practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with Drs. Martha Jay and Lisa Bennett.  He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


CATCH MORE Z’S AND SEE BETTER By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 20, 2018

Burning the candle at both ends? Neglecting your sleep can have an adverse effect on your vision and your eyes by worsening dry eye symptoms. Dry eye syndrome is one of the most common reasons for a visit to an eye doctor, affecting 3.25 million women in the US over the age of 50.  A recent study showed that sleep deprivation can lead to worsening dry eye symptoms.

The symptoms of dry eye syndrome include feeling like there is something in your eye, blurred vision and excessive tearing. The last symptom, tearing, is what gets patients confused. “I thought my eyes were too wet”, is the usual comment.  Your tear film is made up of oil, water and mucus. If your mixture of the three is abnormal, it poorly covers the surface of the eye leaving dry spots. The tiny nerve endings in the surface of the eye (the cornea) detect the problem and send out more, poor quality tears resulting in the annoying drip down your face. This problem is particularly noticeable at the end of the day, after reading or using a computer, in winter or when you are out in the wind.

The study published in the medical journal Investigative Ophthalmology last summer divided a group of 20 healthy individuals into two groups: one stayed up all night and the other had an 8 hour sleep period. The “all nighters” had very salty tears which poorly covered their eyes.  Their eyes were uncomfortable and their vision blurred.

The lesson here is that your eyes need rest too, especially if you already have dry eye symptoms or wear contact lenses. Should adequate rest not solve your dry eye symptoms, however, we are here to help.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an Opt0metrist practicing with Dr. Martha Jay at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He offers comprehensive eye care for the whole family and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


YOU WANT TO PUT PLUGS IN MY EYELIDS?? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 14, 2018

When we suggest punctal “plugs” to a patient, the reaction varies from curiosity to outright panic.  While they are quite routine dry eye care, many patients have not heard of them.  The goal of the plugs is to keep the tears you have in your eyes longer, decreasing your need for tear supplements and improving your eye comfort.

On the upper and lower eyelids in each eye, there are a total of 4 small openings towards the nose which are called puncta.  Each leads to a tiny tube that drains your tears into the back of your nose. The bottom ones carry about 2/3 of the tears and the top the other 1/3. If we block the bottom puncta in each eye, your eyes stay wetter. The plugs are very small, about 1-2 mm, and made of soft plastic. They are easily inserted in the office in a matter of seconds.

Generally we do not suggest plugs at the first signs of dry eyes. We try artificial tears first. If the patient feels that they need to use the tears more than 4 times per day or they are not providing any relief, then plugs or a prescription product called Restasis or Xiidra may be suggested. Those products change the quality of the tears so they coat the eye better. As noted above, the plugs change the quantity of the tears. Sometimes both quality and quantity need improvement. Should that be the case, then plugs and Restasis or Xiidra might be used together.

The symptoms of dry eyes include blurred reading vision at the end of the day, feeling like there is something in the eyes, eye fatigue, red eyes and more. Give us a call if you need relief from this common eye problem.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


9 Ways That Dry Eyes May Interupt Your Life - BUZZ FEED Article

By user-admin
May 30, 2017

Click on the image for a link to Buzz Feed article about dry eyes


COMPUTER VISION SYNDROME By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
July 12, 2016

Computers seem to be taking over our lives and along with that has come an increase in computer related vision complaints. The problem even has a name: “Computer Vision Syndrome.”  The symptoms include burning, itching, dryness or redness of the eyes along with blurred vision.  Usually the complaints begin after about 3 or more hours of computer use.  Other non-vision related problems include tension headaches and lower back pain.

70-90% of those who use computers on a regular basis for work or play experience this syndrome.  Most of the vision symptoms are due to dry eyes.  The association between dry eyes and computer usage is thought to be due to decreased blink rate. Normally we blink about 17 times per minute but with computers use we tend to “stare” and drop the blink rate down to 12-15 times per minute.

What’s the solution? The 20-20-20 rule for start: Every 20 minutes take 20 seconds to refocus 20 feet away. Set the monitor so your eyes are lined up near the top of the screen, requiring you to look down slightly to see the center.  This decreases how exposed or open your eyes are and relaxes your neck. Your screen should also be brighter than the room lighting, so dim the room lights and avoid bright sunlight. Finally, if consciously increasing your blink rate does not help then use tear supplements to improve your comfort and vision.

Other options can be discussed at your next comprehensive eye examination or sooner should there be a more urgent need.  Adapted from “Computer Vision Syndrome Affects Millions” by Jane Brody, New York Times 5/30/16.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


YOU WANT TO PUT PLUGS IN MY EYELIDS?? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
January 13, 2016

When we suggest punctal “plugs” to a patient, the reaction varies from curiosity to outright panic.  While they are quite routine dry eye care, many patients have not heard of them.  The goal of the plugs is to keep the tears you have in your eyes longer, decreasing your need for tear supplements and improving your eye comfort.

On the upper and lower eyelids in each eye, there are a total of 4 small openings towards the nose which are called puncta.  Each leads to a tiny tube that drains your tears into the back of your nose. The bottom ones carry about 2/3 of the tears and the top the other 1/3. If we block the bottom puncta in each eye, your eyes stay wetter. The plugs are very small, about 1-2 mm, and made of soft plastic. They are easily inserted in the office in a matter of seconds.

Generally we do not suggest plugs at the first signs of dry eyes. We try artificial tears first. If the patient feels that they need to use the tears more than 4 times per day or they are not providing any relief, then plugs or a prescription product called Restasis may be suggested. Restasis changed the quality of the tears so they coat the eye better. As noted above, the plugs change the quantity of the tears. Sometimes both quality and quantity need improvement. Should that be the case, then plugs and Restasis might be used together.

Winter is dry eye season! The symptoms include blurred reading vision at the end of the day, feeling like there is something in the eyes, eye fatigue, red eyes and more. Give us a call if you need relief from this common eye problem.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care. For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.

 


CATCH MORE Z’S AND SEE BETTER By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
June 8, 2015

Burning the candle at both ends? Neglecting your sleep can have an adverse effect on your vision and your eyes by worsening dry eye symptoms. Dry eye syndrome is one of the most common reasons for a visit to an eye doctor, affecting 3.25 million women in the US over the age of 50.  A recent study showed that sleep deprivation can lead to worsening dry eye symptoms.

The symptoms of dry eye syndrome include feeling like there is something in your eye, blurred vision and excessive tearing. The last symptom, tearing, is what gets patients confused. “I thought my eyes were too wet”, is the usual comment.  Your tear film is made up of oil, water and mucus. If your mixture of the three is abnormal, it poorly covers the surface of the eye leaving dry spots. The tiny nerve endings in the surface of the eye (the cornea) detect the problem and send out more, poor quality tears resulting in the annoying drip down your face. This problem is particularly noticeable at the end of the day, after reading or using a computer, in winter or when you are out in the wind.

The study published in the medical journal Investigative Ophthalmology last summer divided a group of 20 healthy individuals into two groups: one stayed up all night and the other had an 8 hour sleep period. The “all nighters” had very salty tears which poorly covered their eyes.  Their eyes were uncomfortable and their vision blurred.

The lesson here is that your eyes need rest too, especially if you already have dry eye symptoms or wear contact lenses. Should adequate rest not solve your dry eye symptoms, however, we are here to help.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an optometrist practicing with Dr. Martha Jay at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He specialized in comprehensive eye care, especially for those interested in contact lenses who have had problems getting the appropriate fit in the past.  He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


THAT HOLIDAY TOAST MAY DRY YOUR EYES By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
December 15, 2014

You may find that your eyes feel dry this holiday season and there are a couple of reasons why. One reason is that the air is dryer in winter and so are your eyes. Dry eye symptoms always worsen in the winter months. But there may be another reason. A study published in the respected journal Ophthalmology reported that alcohol consumption actually makes your eyes dryer.

The study subjects were young men without any history of dry eyes. They were divided into two groups, one group had an alcoholic beverage between 8 and 10 pm and the other did not. They then had their eyes examined at midnight and again at 6 and 8 am the next day.  At all three points the group that had the alcoholic beverage showed signs of dry eyes while the other group did not.

Is this news you can use? Sure, if you already have dry eyes you may want to bring along some artificial tears to that holiday party. This is certainly important if you wear contact lenses as they absorb your tear film leaving less to bathe the eye. If you do this and your eyes are still uncomfortable, then you should probably take the contacts out and switch to glasses. You do not want to risk starting out the new year with a bad infection or by damaging your eyes.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Besides tears, there are a number of other treatments for dry eyes. Be sure to discuss this when you come in for your regularly scheduled exam.  You should come in sooner if you have been experiencing worsening dry eye symptoms such as eye pain, blurred vision or feeling like there is something in your eyes.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including blade-free iLASIK and small incision cataract surgery. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


DRY EYES AND COMPUTER USE By Dr Martha Jay at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
February 24, 2014

Due to the miserable winter, this has been a bad year for those with dry eyes. Symptoms of dry eyes vary but generally include feeling like there is something in your eyes, blurred reading vision or eye fatigue. This is caused by your tear film not adequately coating the surface of the eye. In winter the dry air both inside and outside causes your tear film to evaporate faster, thus leading to more symptoms. Generally these symptoms worsen with reading and computer use, during the winter months and at the end of the day.

While it has been long known that computer use contributes to dry eyes, a recent study showed that the effects are far more universal than previously thought. The study evaluated the effects of computer use on dry eye symptoms and found that over 75% of female and about 60% of male office workers who use computers have dry eye symptoms! The test sample was of office workers in Japan and included a questionnaire of symptoms along with a thorough eye examination.

The association between dry eyes and computer usage is thought to be due to decreased blink rate. We all tend to stare when using computers. A good way to be more comfortable while using computers is to try to blink more, occasionally refocus farther away and to use tear supplements.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

If those strategies are not effective, you may need other treatments such as prescription drops (Restasis) or punctual plugs which keep the tears that you have in your eyes last longer. Those options and more can be explained at the time of your complete eye examination. Meanwhile, realize that your eyes will be more comfortable once the humidity increases in a few months.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist (Eye Physician and Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye cares such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. She practices with Dr. Mark German and Dr. Josephine-Liezl Cueto at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


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