General Eye Care

GIVE THANKS FOR GOOD VISION By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
November 7, 2019

Most of us pretty much take our vision for granted but maintaining good vision does take some effort on your part. You should be sure to have a complete eye examination with dilating drops at least every two years.  If you have diabetes, then you should come in every year.  We generally see glaucoma patients every six months.  Warning signs that would warrant an immediate eye examination include eye pain, light sensitivity, blurred vision, and loss of side vision or an increase in floaters.

You may have good vision but what about your relatives or neighbors?  If you are starting to think about holiday gifts, consider something that would make their lives easier.  They probably have enough “stuff” but might really benefit from a ride to the store, doctor’s appointment or just an outing for some fun.  There are options, although limited, to get around if you don’t drive in Ozaukee County.  But the loss of freedom is pretty distressing to many seniors who can no longer drive due to impaired vision or other medical problems.

The above is just something to reflect upon during the Thanksgiving holiday season.  And while you are at it, don’t forget to schedule those eye appointments for yourself and your family!  Remember that we provide advanced medical and surgical eye care for patients of all ages including complete eye examinations, contact lens fitting, LASIK vision correction and small incision cataract surgery. We are certainly thankful for all our wonderful patients at Madison Medical Eye Care and wish a joyous Thanksgiving holiday to one and all.

Dr. Lisa Bennett practices comprehensive ophthalmology at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans. Dr. Bennett specializes in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery, LASIK vision correction, macular degeneration, dry eyes, glaucoma and more.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


New YorK Times Article: Those Puppy Eyes You Can't Resist? Thank Evolution!

By user-admin
October 31, 2019

Click on the photo to the left for a link to a New York Times articles about those puppy eye!


CHECKING IN WITH DR. BENNETT By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 31, 2019

Where did the time go? I’ve now been part of the Madison Medical Eye Care team for almost 4 months! The staff in both our Mequon and Saukville offices, the operating room staff at Ascension Columbia-St. Mary’s Ozaukee and the LASIK center staff in Brookfield have gone out of their way to make me feel welcome.  Not to mention our wonderful patients who have trusted me with their eye care. Thank you one and all.

With all your help, I have settled in just fine. I was fortunate to have joined an established well-run practice with up-to-date equipment. In addition, Drs. Martha Jay and James Ivanoski have proven to be great colleagues.

As for the upcoming year of 2020, what eye care professional would not be excited about a year that signifies clear vision?  I hope to be part of your future to optimize your vision in the coming year.  Whether you have cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, dry eyes or are considering LASIK vision correction, I am here to help.

Being part of the only full-time ophthalmology practice in Ozaukee County, we are all here for you with more acute eye problems also such as eye injuries, changing vision, increased floaters or eye pain.  If you are not sure if your problem needs immediate attention, our staff can assist you. Just call.

You might think I will not be able to take Wisconsin winters, having moved here from St. Louis, but fear not. I grew up in a Chicago suburb so I am more that prepared for whatever Mother Nature has in store for us in the coming months.

So I look forward to meeting more of you in 2020. As an Ophthalmologist, I am a medical doctor (MD) specializing in medical and surgical eye care. I am now accepting patients in both our Mequon & Saukville offices.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 

 


WHY ARE CORNEAL ABRASIONS SO PAINFUL? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 30, 2019

This may have happened to you: A sudden onset of intense pain in one eye, light sensitivity and copious tearing. It may even feel like there is something in your eye. You go in for an evaluation with your eye care professional and find out that you have a tiny scratch on the surface of your eye. Why should such a tiny injury hurt so much? The answer is that the cornea, or clear part of the front of your eye, has the highest density of sensory nerve fibers of any part of the body. The pain from a huge abrasion may not feel that much worse than the pain from a small scratch. The pain will persist until the injury has become initially healed.

The cornea is a layered structure. The outer layer is called the epithelium and this is the layer that is usually affected by an abrasion. Abrasions can be caused by dryness, accidental injury (baby fingernails are a common culprit), removing a contact lens too roughly or from a small particle flying in your eye. We generally treat them with lubrication in the form of artificial tears and antibiotic drops to prevent infection. We usually recommend NOT wearing contact lenses until the injury has healed.  An exception would be if the abrasion is particularly large, then a bandage contact lens may be applied        and left on day and night for several days.

Once the pain resolves, you are still not completely healed as the surface epithelium has to lay “footplates” down to the layer below. This can take up to 6 weeks so eye rubbing is strictly forbidden during that time or you risk the problems starting all over again. Most abrasions heal well but can be quite miserable in the meantime.  Remember we are here to help should this happen to you.

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an MD Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. She specialized in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WHAT IS A STYE? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 10, 2019

A stye (also spelled "sty") is a red, tender bump on the eyelid. The medical term for the condition is hordeolum. It develops when one or more glands at the edge of the eyelid become infected. It can occur on the inside or outside of the eyelid.   Styes are not harmful to your vision but can become quite uncomfortable and unattractive.

Initial symptoms of a stye include pain, redness, tenderness and swelling in the area. The glands around the eyelid that are affected are called meibominan glands which are sebaceous glands, otherwise known as sweat glands.  Styes are more common in people with rosacea, a skin condition with overactive sebaceous glands.

A stye results from an acute infection of these meibomian glands or may also may arise from an infected hair follicle at the base of an eyelash. The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for 90-95% of cases of styes.   A stye can also develop as a complication of a low-grade eyelid infection called blepharitis.

Treatment begins with applying warm compresses over the affected area four times per day and cleansing the area with baby shampoo twice daily.  A prescription antibiotic ointment that is safe for use around the eyes may also be necessary along with occasional use of oral antibiotics.  The stye may rupture and drain, resulting in quicker healing.  If not, occasionally lancing in the office is required. Once they resolve, it is important to continue the baby shampoo lid scrubs so they do not return.

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Eye Physician & Surgeon (Ophthalmologist) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WHY WE DO WHAT WE DO By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 4, 2019

What are all those questions, measurements and eye drops about when you come for an eye exam?  These are reasonable questions that most of us wonder about but rarely think to ask.  A complete eye exam is a thorough medical evaluation of your eyes and your vision.

We start with a comprehensive medical history because many medical conditions and medications can affect the eyes. Diabetes and high blood pressure are obvious but arthritic conditions, neurological problems and many other medical diagnoses can have an influence on the functioning of the eyes.  We then ask about any vision problems you may be having to get a sense of how your vision is affecting activities such as driving and reading.

The measuring comes in with determining your current glasses prescription and seeing if we can improve on that with a change - this is called refraction. We also check your pupils, eye movements, side vision and eye pressure.  All these factors are critical to being sure no problems such as glaucoma are present.

The reason for the dilating drops is to get a clear view of the back of your eye called the retina.  This is the only place in the body where we can directly view blood vessels which can be affected by diabetes and other problems. We also look for tears, tumors and evidence of macular degeneration.

So each and every step is important at least every 1-2 years!

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Lisa Bennett at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


IS YOUR EYE PROBLEM AN EMERGENCY? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care - Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 19, 2019

You know that you should have your eyes examined every one to two years or more frequently if you have active eye problems such as glaucoma.  More questionable is when you should be seen right away, in other words what constitutes an eye emergency.

Sudden vision loss or decreased vision in one or both eyes is definitely an eye emergency.  Loss of vision may include:  a total blacking out of vision, missing a portion of vision (like the entire right side being gone), having a curtain come down across the vision and/or sudden blurred vision that is not resolving.  Any sudden loss of vision should be evaluated promptly to determine the cause and possible treatment.

New onset double vision should also be evaluated promptly, especially if it goes away when you cover one eye.  This may be a sign of uncontrolled diabetes, high blood pressure, multiple sclerosis or other conditions that affect the brain.

Any trauma to the eyes should always be seen as soon as possible.  Any chemicals that get in the eye should be rinsed out copiously with water for 15-30 minutes even before coming in. Injuries that cause a lot of eye pain, light sensitivity, double vision or decreased vision should be evaluated right away.

Red eyes and associated significant pain, light sensitivity or decreased vision should be seen quickly.  Some eye infections or inflammations can cause permanent vision loss if not treated promptly.

Our staff is very good at determining what constitutes an eye emergency. Give us a call if you have any doubts about whether you eye problem is an emergency and we will be sure that you get the care you need in a timely manner.

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Eye Physician & Surgeon (Ophthalmologist) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


BLUE BLOCKERS By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 23, 2019

Blue blocker glasses are a hot topic in eye care.  These amber tinted sunglasses reduce glare and protect the eyes from ultraviolet light (invisible radiation from the sun that causes sunburn) and visible blue light.

For years we have known that ultraviolet light (invisible radiation from the sun that causes sunburn) can accelerate age related eye problems like cataracts, skin cancer, and macular degeneration.  We recommend that everybody wear sunglasses (including blue blockers) when outdoors to protect the eyes from ultraviolet light.

Now studies are being done on visible blue light and the effects on the eyes.   There is no conclusive evidence that blue light from hand held devices and computer screens damage the eyes in the same way that ultraviolet light does.  Our computers and phones are not causing macular degeneration and cataracts.  We do not recommend specific blue blocking glasses for computer use, but sometimes a light amber tint may improve comfort (reduce eye strain and glare) when viewing a computer screen.

The blue light from computers and hand held devices has been shown to affect sleep cycles.  It is recommended to avoid screen time 1-2 hours before bedtime.  Lack of sleep affects overall health including eye health

Dr. James Ivanoski

Eye strain and dry eye are worsened by excessive screen time.  It is recommended to take a break from computer work every 20 minutes to look at a farther away object for at least 20 seconds.  Blue blocker glasses are a good thing since they also protect from the harmful ultraviolet light, but are not necessary for looking at computer screens or phones.

Dr. James is an Optometrist practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He specializes in comprehensive eye care for all ages and accepts most insurance plans.  He particularly welcomes contact lens wearers who have been having difficulties getting the right fit or vision from their contacts in the past.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


METFORMIN MAY DECREASE YOUR RISK FOR MACULAR DEGENERATION By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 13, 2019

No one likes being told that they are now a diabetic and need to take medications. You usually try losing weight first but even then you sometimes just have to face the facts: you need a medication like metformin to bring your blood sugars down. There was a recent study that may make you more enthusiastic about taking the pills: it appears that the use of metformin may decrease the risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, a leading cause of vision loss in those over 65 years-old!

The study appeared in the medical journal Investigative Ophthalmology in April. The medical records of almost 8000 patients over the age of 55 year-old in Florida with newly diagnosed dry macular degeneration were analyzed.  They all had at least 3 complete eye examinations without evidence of macular degeneration before starting the metformin.  They were compared against a control group with 4 consecutive examinations without evidence of macular degeneration. Those taking metformin were 32% less likely to be diagnosed with macular degeneration.

Of course this does not mean that those who do not need metformin for diabetes should start taking it. It also does not establish cause and effect as the data is what we call “retrospective” or looking back. It is very interesting, however, and gives those reluctant diabetics out there cause for a little joy.

Macular degeneration is an aging change affecting the back of the eye known as the retina. It has both a mild “dry” and more aggressive “wet” form. Besides taking metformin if you doctor recommends it, other protective measures include eating plenty of leafy green vegetables, wearing sunglasses outside and not smoking.

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care. She practices with Drs. James Ivanoski and Martha Jay at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WELCOME DR. BENNETT! By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 28, 2019

I am so pleased, along with Dr. Ivanoski and our entire staff at Madison Medical Eye care, that the day has almost come for Dr. Lisa Bennett to join our team! She is an Eye Physician and Surgeon specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as cataract surgery, LASIK vision correction, glaucoma care, macular degeneration management, dry eye treatments and more. She is scheduling appointments for August so now is the perfect time to call for your next eye examination with her.

Dr. Bennett is moving to the Milwaukee area after completing her ophthalmology training at St. Louis University. She graduated summa cum laude from the University of Minnesota with a B.S. in Biochemistry and then completed her M.D. degree at the Chicago Medical School.  Up next was a transitional year in Internal Medicine at the University of Chicago. This is required of all ophthalmologists to be sure they are well grounded in general medicine before specializing in eye care.

She very much enjoys teaching and has instructed part of the cataract surgery courses at Saint Louis University.  Her greatest passion is to be able to offer her patients the newest and most advanced medical and surgical eye care technologies available.  She has a personal experience with LASIK, having had the procedure herself. She is pleased to offer astigmatism correction and multifocal implants with cataract surgery, as well as blade-free LASIK and PRK.

She is not all work, however, she enjoys being active and has completed two marathons.  She and her husband also enjoy hiking, traveling and of course Wisconsin cheese.  You will be please to know that she will be seeing patients at both the Mequon and Saukville offices.

Give her a try, you will be very impressed.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


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