Cataracts: Symptoms and Treatment

WHICH IMPLANT AT THE TIME OF CATARACT SURGERY? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 28, 2020

If you have cataracts, you probably already know that cataract surgery is a 10-15 minute outpatient procedure that is generally done without the need of shots, stitches or patches. What you may not know is that we always replace your natural lens with a small plastic implant as otherwise you would not be able to see without very thick glasses. There are several implants options available. Which is right for you depends on how dependent you want to be on glasses after the procedure. Another factor concerns astigmatism, or whether your eyes are round like a baseball or curved like a football.

If you do not have astigmatism and do not mind using over-the-counter reading glasses or going back into bifocals, then the standard lens is for you. This lens corrects your distance vision and is covered by your insurance minus any deductible you may have. If you do have astigmatism, then you might want to consider a Toric implant. This option would make your distance vision clearer without glasses than a standard lens but, as with the standard lens, you would need reading glasses.  How do you know if you have astigmatism? We determine that at the time of your cataract evaluation.

If you would prefer to be as glasses independent as possible, then you should consider a Multi-focal implant. In the past this lens was only available to those without astigmatism but now we can correct for the astigmatism, distance vision, intermediate vision and near vision all in one lens. There is an upcharge for both the Toric and Multi-focal implants. You only have cataract surgery once so you want to choose wisely.      At your cataract evaluation we will thoroughly discuss your implant options and help you select the one best suited for your visual needs.  While non-urgent surgeries such as cataracts have been delayed, we are not starting to slowly and safely begin to re-schedule them.

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. She specializes in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedical.com.

 


PARTIAL RE-OPENING OF MADISON MEDICAL EYE CARE By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 14, 2020

We have missed you these last few months! While tele-health visits have been an adventure they are no substitute for an actual eye examination. Up until now those in-person visits have been reserved for patients with true emergent eye problems such as possible retinal detachments. On those rare occasions everyone, including the patients, have worn masks. All parts of the exam room and office have been thoroughly disinfected before and after each patient. Our parking lot has been turned into the waiting room and the cell phone our way to communicate with patients about their reasons for the visit and reviewing medical histories.

We are now starting to slowly open up to non-urgent care but at a significantly reduced traffic flow. We will use what we have learned over the last few months to assure that our patients and staff remain safe. All staff from the front desk, technicians, doctors and billing staff will continue to wear masks all day. Patients will also wear masks of their own supply. All patients will be screened for respiratory symptoms prior to the appointment and their appointments will be rescheduled should there be any question of their health. Contact with staff will be minimized. Contact with other patients non-existent or at most minimal.

As for those who have had their eye surgeries delayed, we are now slowly opening to elective surgeries at Ascension Columbia-St. Mary’s Ozaukee.  As cataract surgery is not a life and death procedure, our patients have been very understanding in allowing more urgent procedures to take precedent up until now. We have already started contacting those whose surgeries have been delayed for rescheduling..

The “new normal” is certainly not what we thought the year 2020 would be.  We adapt, we move forward. We will see you when we see you…

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery, blade-free LASIK and more. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919.


HOW MUCH TIME SHOULD YOU TAKE OFF FOR CATARACT SURGERY? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 19, 2020

We often find that patients over estimate how disruptive cataract surgery will be to their routine. They wait until they have absolutely nothing planned for weeks before they call to schedule their surgery. Really cataract surgery only takes two days off your regular activities: the day of the surgery and the day after. On the day of surgery you do need a driver to pick you up from the hospital, due to mild sedation used, but if you live alone you do not need anyone to stay with you. The next day we generally see you in the office but many people drive themselves to that appointment. It’s a good idea to clear your schedule on that day while you adjust to your new eyes.

You will be using eye drops to aid in healing but they are all combined in one bottle so you no longer have to fuss with three separate bottles. If you are worried about being able to do the drops yourself, we have a number of helpful tips and can give you a tear sample to practice ahead of time.

We do our best to accommodate your appointments around what works for you. We do one eye at a time, generally waiting 2-4 weeks between the surgeries. If getting driver on the day of surgery is an issue, many either drive themselves and get picked up or do a “tag team” with one person dropping them off and another picking them up.   You are usually at the hospital about three hours.

See, that’s not so disruptive to your schedule. Especially when you consider all the annoyances of avoiding night driving as your cataracts progress.  Hopefully this gives you a more realistic understanding about how much time you need to set aside for your cataract surgery – not much!

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WHICH IMPLANT AT THE TIME OF CATARACT SURGERY? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 7, 2020

If you have cataracts, you probably already know that cataract surgery is a 10-15 minute outpatient procedure that is generally done without the need of shots, stitches or patches. What you may not know is that we always replace your natural lens with a small plastic implant as otherwise you would not be able to see without very thick glasses. There are several implants options available. Which is right for you depends on how dependent you want to be on glasses after the procedure. Another factor concerns astigmatism, or whether your eyes are round like a baseball or curved like a football.

If you do not have astigmatism and do not mind using over-the-counter reading glasses or going back into bifocals, then the standard lens is for you. This lens corrects your distance vision and is covered by your insurance minus any deductible you may have. If you do have astigmatism, then you might want to consider a Toric implant. This option would make your distance vision clearer without glasses than a standard lens but, as with the standard lens, you would need reading glasses.  How do you know if you have astigmatism? We determine that at the time of your cataract evaluation.

If you would prefer to be able to see far away and read without glasses, then you should consider a Bifocal implant. In the past this lens was only available to those without astigmatism but now we can correct for the astigmatism, distance vision and near vision all in one lens. The is an up-charge for both the Toric and Bifocal implant but you only have cataract surgery once so you want to choose wisely.

At your cataract evaluation we thoroughly discuss your implant options and help you select the one that best suits your visual needs. See you soon!

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She practices with Drs. Lisa Bennett and James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


HOLIDAY LIGHT HALOS By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Suakville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
December 9, 2019

Holiday season is here along with many displays of decorative exterior lighting.  While they can be quite beautiful, sometimes how the holiday lights appear can alert you that something might not be quite right with your vision.

Starbursts and halos are a common vision complaint when looking at holiday lights or even headlights all year long.  We use the term “starburst” to describe what you see when a pinpoint of light appears to have radiating spokes coming off it. The term “halo” describes when you see circles around a light source. Both symptoms can be due to something as benign as not having the most up-to-date glasses or contact lens prescription to more serious problems such as cataracts. If you are noticing these symptoms, during the holiday season or anytime during the year, your first move is to call us for a comprehensive eye examination so we can determine the cause and take care of it.

Cataracts are a clouding of the lens in the front of the eye, behind the colored iris.  They can make lights appear dim, cause glare or make colors appear dull.  Cataracts are removed with a 10 minute outpatient surgery generally these days without shots, stitches or patches. The surgery involves replacing the cloudy lens with a clear plastic lens implant.  There are a number of options for these implants which will be discussed should this be found to be your problem.

Take time this holiday season to enjoy the many wonderful lighting displays.  But if the lights appear a little different this year, consider getting an eye examination. Your problem could be cataracts but it could also just be that your glasses need updating or that you have dry eyes. Have a very happy holiday season!

Dr. Lisa Bennett if an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans. She practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


MY FRIEND COULD SEE PERFECTLY RIGHT AFTER CATARACT SURGERY, WHY CAN’T I? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 30, 2019

On the first day after cataract surgery, patients have varying expectations of how well they will see. Most are happy that everything went well in surgery and that their vision is already starting to improve. Others expect perfection on day one, which is not realistic. This expectation is often fueled by a friend reporting “perfect” vision on day one. While some patients can see 20/20 on the first day after cataract surgery, slight or even significant blurriness is not uncommon at that point.

Even though cataract surgery is relatively quick, often only a 10 minute procedure, it is still an operation. Your eye needs time to heal.  If the cataract was particularly dense then sometimes the surgery is slightly longer and results in some swelling on the cornea, the clear front part of the eye. Sometimes other problems cause delayed healing such as diabetic eye disease, macular degeneration or prior other eye surgeries.

We always see you on the day after your surgery to be sure you are progressing as planned. We check you vision, eye pressure and do a brief eye examination. We also want to be sure you understand how to use the post-operative drops and what your restrictions are. We may suggest the use of over-the-counter reading glasses at that time if your cataract implant was for distance vision.

As everyone is different, everyone’s perception of “perfect” is also slightly different. We realize that cataract surgery is all new to you so don’t hesitate to call if you have any questions or concerns between your appointments. While some worry that they are bothering us to call, it is certainly not the case! We are here to help.

Dr. Martha Jay is an Eye Physician & Surgeon specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK vision correction. She practices with Dr. Lisa Bennett and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


WHAT IS CATARACT REALLY SURGERY LIKE? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 27, 2019

Have you been delaying having cataract surgery because you are apprehensive about what the experience may be like? Does just the word “surgery” scare you? Does it bring to mind pain, long recovery and time off from your favorite activities? Fear not, nothing could be farther from the truth with cataract surgery these days.

We do cataract surgery generally without shots, stitches or patches and the whole procedure takes only 10-15 minutes. We use mild I.V. sedation to relax you and numbing drops on the surface of the eye to prevent pain. Afterwards, you look pretty much the way you did on the way in: no patch over the eye, no black and blue bruising. You should take 2 days off your regular activities, one for the actual procedure and the next day to allow your vision to settle down. Then the only restrictions then are to avoid eye make-up, swimming or pushing on the eye for 2 weeks.

On the day of surgery, you change into a hospital gown and an I.V. is started. Once in the operating room, your job is to look at a bright light. You may see pretty colors like a prism as we remove your natural lens and replace it with a tiny plastic implant.  About 30 minutes after the procedure, you go home or even out to lunch. You do need a ride, as some of the sedation may still be in effect, but you won’t need extra help at home.

So, breath-in and breath-out, cataracts surgery is generally a quick and easy event. It is the most common operation in America and patients are typically thrilled with the results.  If every procedure worked as well as cataract surgery, the world would be a much better place!

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. She specializes in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


CATARACT SURGERY IMPROVES YOUR OUTLOOK ON LIFE By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon/Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 20, 2019

When you think of cataract surgery, generally the visual change that comes to mind is an improvement in clarity but there are other added benefits: you color vision improves also. Cataracts cause the lens inside your eye to turn a yellow/brown. This makes blues look darker and whites to have a yellowed appearance. Before surgery this is not very noticeable as the change is quite gradual. When we do cataract surgery, we replace the yellowed natural lens with a clear plastic implant. Then, overnight, blues appear more vivid and whites whiter!  Since we operate on one eye at a time, the color perception difference between eyes is noticeable while waiting for the second eye to have surgery. Once both eyes have the implants, however, the world looks not only clearer but more colorful too!

How do you know if you have cataracts? Generally the symptoms include blurred distance vision, especially for driving at night. Sometimes you see glare or halos around lights. The actual diagnosis has to be made by your eye doctor after a complete, dilated eye examination. There are many other possible sources of blurred vision.  Some are minor and others are more serious. You could just need an adjustment in your glasses prescription or you could have a problem with your retina such as macular degeneration.

To get started on improving your outlook on life, schedule an eye examination and we will determine how to make you see as well as possible. Should your problem be cataracts, the surgery takes only 10-15 minutes and nowadays you generally don’t have to bother with shots, stitches or patches. See you soon!

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Eye Physician & Surgeon (Ophthalmologist) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery, blade-free LASIK, glaucoma treatments, macular degeneration care, dry eye management and more. She practices at Madison Medical Eye Care with Drs. Martha Jay and James Ivanoski. They have offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WHAT IS CATARACT REALLY SURGERY LIKE? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madision Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 16, 2019

Have you been delaying having cataract surgery because you are apprehensive about what the experience may be like? Does just the word “surgery” scare you? Does it bring to mind pain, long recovery and time off from your favorite activities? Fear not, nothing could be farther from the truth with cataract surgery these days.

We do cataract surgery generally without shots, stitches or patches and the whole procedure takes only 10-15 minutes. We use mild I.V. sedation to relax you and numbing drops on the surface of the eye to prevent pain. Afterwards, you look pretty much the way you did on the way in: no patch over the eye, no black and blue bruising. You should take 2 days off your regular activities, one for the actual procedure and the next day to allow your vision to settle down. Then the only restrictions then are to avoid eye make-up, swimming or pushing on the eye for 2 weeks.

On the day of surgery, you change into a hospital gown and an I.V. is started. Once in the operating room, your job is to look at a bright light. You may see pretty colors like a prism as we remove your natural lens and replace it with a tiny plastic implant.  About 30 minutes after the procedure, you go home or even out to lunch. You do need a ride, as some of the sedation may still be in effect, but you won’t need extra help at home.

So, breath-in and breath-out, cataracts surgery is generally a quick and easy event. It is the most common operation in America and patients are typically thrilled with the results.  If every procedure worked as well as cataract surgery, the world would be a much better place!

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski. She manages medical and surgical eye conditions such as cataracts, LASIK vision correction, glaucoma, macular degeneration, dry eyes and more.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


MORE EVIDENCE FOR THE iSTENT By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 21, 2019

We have been recommending the iStent at the time of cataract surgery over the last few years for our patients who have both cataracts and glaucoma.  The purpose of the iStent is to increase the flow of fluid out of the eye in order to decrease eye pressure. Glaucoma is a condition where the fluid in the eye is either coming in too fast or leaving too slowly.  The buildup of pressure can cause permanent vision loss so is generally treated with eye drops.

The iStent is a tiny device, in fact it is the smallest implantable device in medicine measuring only 230 microns by 360 microns. As you may remember, there are only 1000 microns in a millimeter so that means it is only around ¼ by 1/3 of a millimeter.  After the cataract is removed and the lens inserted, we have the patient turn their head to one side and then place two of these iStents at the edge of the eye. You cannot see them without special mirrors.

When compared to cataract surgery alone, we know that the iStent does generally result in lower eye pressure. A new study just came out looked at if there was a difference in the number of glaucoma eye drops patients used after cataract surgery and found that those with the iStent had a reduction even if they were using 3 or more drops. In fact, the more the drops used the bigger the drop in the number required. This was reported in the medical journal Ophthalmology in January.  The data came from a managed care network and involved almost 3000 patients.

These results mirror what we have found also with this remarkable device. We can talk about whether the iStent is an option for you at your cataract evaluation.

Dr. Martha Jay is an Eye Physician & Surgeon practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. She specializes in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


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