Cataracts: Symptoms and Treatment

BASEBALL VS FOOTBALL EYES By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 29, 2018

Brewers Fans know that the season has begun!  What they may not know is that baseball is not just a sport but also a way to explain the shape of your eyes.  You have “football eyes” if the front of your eyes are curved like a football. This is called astigmatism.  You have “baseball eyes” if the front of your eyes are more rounded like a baseball.

It is important to know if you have “football” or “baseball” eyes if you are considering cataract surgery.  The differences between the two determine which implant options are available to you at the time of surgery.  Cataract surgery is a very safe and relatively easy procedure to go through.  We gently remove your natural cloudy lens and replace it with a clear implant to improve your vision.

The latest advancements in cataract surgery allow us to take advantage of more implant choices than previously available. If you have football eyes, you would see better afterwards if we place a Toric implant at the time of your cataract surgery.  If you have baseball eyes, then you could benefit from a Multi-focal implant that allows you to see far away, intermediate and close up after your surgery without glasses.  These bifocal-like implants let you turn back the clock and be relatively free of glasses after your procedure.

How can you tell if you have football or baseball eyes?  How do you know which implant is best for you at the time of your cataract surgery?  We will guide you through your available options during your cataract evaluation.  Remember, you only have cataract surgery once so it is important to consider all the possibilities.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisionMedicalEyeCare.com.


Have Cataract Surgery and Live Longer: New York Times article by Jane Brody

By user-admin
December 5, 2017

Click on the drawing on the left for a link to a New York Times article by Jane Brody about the wonders of cataract surgery, it can even prolong your life!


ASTIGMATISM EXPLAINED By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 28, 2017

Astigmatism refers to the curvature of the surface of your eye.  If your eye is round like a baseball, you do not have astigmatism and can quit reading now!  But if the front of your eye has a curvature, making it shaped more like a football than a baseball, then you have astigmatism.

Generally patients don’t realize they have astigmatism.  We may mention it when we determine your glasses prescription but often we just write the prescription to compensate for it.

Serious discussions of astigmatism generally start when a patient is considering cataract surgery, LASIK vision correction or contact lenses.  There are special Toric contacts available for those with astigmatism and often they work quite well.  Many, however, find that toric contacts don’t provide consistent vision as they tend to rotate on the eye with blinking.

There is a common misconception that you cannot have LASIK if you have astigmatism but this is absolutely not true.  In fact this is actually a frequent reason for patients to elect to have LASIK as they are unhappy with their vision in glasses or contact lenses.

If you have astigmatism and cataracts, we can insert Toric implants at the time of surgery to improve your vision. More recently, Bifocal Toric implants have become available, now making bifocal implants an option for those with astigmatism.

Still confused?  Call for a complete eye examination and we will determine if you have significant astigmatism and how best to compensate for it.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


iSTENT: NEW SURGICAL OPTION FOR GLAUCOMA By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsino,

By user-admin
August 28, 2017

iStent

If you have glaucoma and cataracts, there is a new surgical option to tackle both at the time of your cataract surgery called the iStent. This tiny device (1 mm by 0.3 mm) helps control your eye pressure by increasing the outflow of fluid from the front of the eye. The eye is like a small plumbing system: there is fluid constantly entering the eye from behind the pupil and leaving it through a sponge-like meshwork at the edges of the eye in front of the colored iris. By placing the iStent, we bypass this meshwork, allowing the fluid to leave more quickly and with the goal of decreasing eye pressure.

The iStent is part of a new type of glaucoma care called Micro-Invasive Glaucoma Surgery or MIGS.   In the past glaucoma was mainly managed with eye drops, lasers or extensive surgery. This new option is less traumatic to the eye than traditional glaucoma surgery but does need to be done at the time of cataract surgery. Once the cataract procedure is completed and the lens implant in place, we then turn the patient’s head to one side and insert the iStent. You cannot see or feel the stent.

How do you know if the iStent is an option for you?  We will discuss this in more detail at your next eye examination but generally your glaucoma must be mild or moderate. If you have severe glaucoma, for example taking multiple medications for this or have significant vision loss, then other surgical options will be discussed.  If you have already had cataract surgery or your cataracts are not ready yet for surgery, you also would not be a candidate for the iStent at this time.

Regardless of the treatment for glaucoma, close follow-up is important to be sure this condition is well controlled. That generally means seeing you at least every 6 months: one visit with dilating drops and the other with the side vision test along with the scan of the back of the eye. We look forward to sharing this new innovation in glaucoma care with you in the near future.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as glaucoma care, cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


New Surgical option for Glaucoma the iStent By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
July 21, 2017

iStent

Do you have glaucoma and cataracts? Perhaps you are a candidate for placement of an iStent at the time of your cataract surgery. Click on the image to the right for an informative video about this new innovation.  This is the smallest implantable device in medicine as you can see with it's comparison to the size of a penny. We can discuss if the iStent is an option for you at your next eye examination.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery, glaucoma surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


WHAT’S CATARACT SURGERY LIKE? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 7, 2017

What exactly happens during cataract surgery? Many with cataracts are afraid to have the surgery because they don’t really know what it would be like. Just

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

the word “surgery” scares them. It brings to mind pain, long recovery and time off from your favorite activities. Nothing could be farther from the truth with cataract surgery.

Modern cataract surgery is done without shots, stitches or patches. It takes only about 10 to 15 minutes. We use only mild I.V. sedation to relax you. You don’t feel anything because there are numbing drops applied to the surface of the eye. Afterwards, you look pretty much the way you did on the way in: no patch over the eye, no black and blue bruising. We recommend that you take 2 days off your regular activities, one for the actual procedure and the next day to allow your vision to settle. Then the only restrictions are no eye make-up, swimming or pushing on the eye for 2 weeks.

On the day of surgery, you change into a hospital gown and then an I.V. is started. Once in the operating room you look at a bright light. There IS NO PAIN. You may see pretty colors from a prism like effect of the lens as we remove it and replace it with a tiny plastic implant. About 30 minutes after the procedure, you go home or even out to lunch. You do need a ride as some of the sedation may still be in effect but you won’t need extra help at home.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

So, breath-in and breath-out, cataracts surgery is generally a quick and easy. It is the most common operation in America and patients are thrilled with the results. If every procedure worked as well as cataract surgery, the world would be a much better place!

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


WHAT IS A SECONDARY CATARACT? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 27, 2017

A common question from patients is, “Do cataracts come back?” The answer is yes and no. Once you have cataract surgery, you do not have to go back to the operating room at a later date to repeat the procedure. What can happen is that you may develop a secondary cataract. This is a clouding behind the implant and is easily treated with a quick laser procedure.

The lens in the eye is shaped like a tiny pillow, rounded on the edges and flattened on the front and back. It is covered with a thin membrane, measuring less than 5 microns thick. At the time of cataract surgery, we carefully remove a circular area from the front of this membrane and gently vacuum out your cloudy lens. We then use this remaining membrane, known as “the bag,” to support the plastic intraocular lens which allows you to see clearly after surgery.

In about 10% of cases, this membrane becomes cloudy over time and we call it a secondary cataract. It usually takes 2-3 years for this to happen and the symptoms are very similar to those noticed prior to the original surgery: blurred distance vision, glare and halos around lights.

As previously mentioned, the treatment is a quick laser. You wear street clothes and put your chin on something that looks just like what we use in the office during your eye exam. Afterwards there are no activity restrictions and the potential risk for complications is minimal. So if you start to notice that your vision has become blurred several years after cataract surgery, come in and we will determine if this is your problem. If so, clear vision is just a quick laser away.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK Vision Correction. She practices at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


“CAN I BEND OVER AFTER CATARACT SURGERY?” By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 10, 2017

This has got to be the most common question I hear from cataract patients. Their sister, neighbor or friend at church told them, “Be sure you don’t bend over after your cataract surgery.” We give out specific written instructions after cataract surgery that NEVER mention a bending restriction but this question persists. Where did it come from and why won’t it go away?

The where it came from is easy: in the past (more than 20 years ago) cataract surgery involved making a very large incision that was almost 180 degrees across the top of the eye. While there are some surgeons who have STILL not adapted the newer techniques, 99% make a very small incision (only 2.4 mm in my case). When the incision was much larger, bending over during the healing process put stress on that large incision and the many sutures required to close it.

Modern cataract surgery is generally done without stitches, patches or shots. That means that the restrictions after surgery are different too. For my patients I have only have 4 rules (besides what you do with the eye drops) for the first two weeks after cataract surgery: 1) no pushing on the eye, 2) no eye makeup, 3) no swimming and 4) do wear a plastic shield over the eye at night.

This only applies to my patients. Be sure that if you are having surgery with another ophthalmologist that you follow their instructions. That is good advice for any type of medical procedure, the instructions are intended help you have the best possible outcome. Now you can help me make this myth go away: be sure to read your post-operative instructions but don’t read too much into them!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK Vision correction.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


BASEBALL VS FOOTBALL EYES By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 9, 2017

Brewers Fans know that Opening Day is coming up early next month. What they may not know is that baseball is not just a sport but also a way to explain the shape of your eyes. You have “football eyes” if the front of your eyes are curved like a football. This is called astigmatism. You have “baseball eyes” if the front of your eyes are more rounded like a baseball.

It is important to know if you have “football” or “baseball” eyes if you are considering cataract surgery. The differences between the two determine which implant options are available to you at the time of surgery. Cataract surgery is a very safe and relatively easy procedure to go through. We gently remove your natural cloudy lens and replace it with a clear implant to improve your vision.

The latest advancements in cataract surgery allow us to take advantage of more implant choices than previously available. If you have football eyes, you would see better afterwards if we place a Toric implant at the time of your cataract surgery. If you have baseball eyes, then you could benefit from a Multi-focal implant that allows you to see far away, intermediate and close up after your surgery without glasses. These bifocal-like implants let you turn back the clock and be relatively free of glasses after your procedure.

How can you tell if you have football or baseball eyes? How do you know which implant is best for you at the time of your cataract surgery? We will guide you through your available options during your cataract evaluation. Remember, you only have cataract surgery once so it is important to consider all the possibilities. Your choice will have an impact on how you see for the rest of your life.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery, blade-free LASIK, glaucoma care, macular degeneration management, dry eye treatment and more. She practices at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


WHAT’S NEW IN GLAUCOMA TREATMENT? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
November 28, 2016

Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss and is generally managed with eye drops. Now there is good news for those of you who are contemplating cataract surgery and also have glaucoma: The iStent. This tiny device can be placed in the eye at the time of cataract surgery to better control eye pressure. The eye is like a tiny plumbing system.  There is a small amount of fluid constantly entering the eye from behind the pupil and then leaving it at the edges of the eye, in front of the colored iris. This fluid is called “aqueous humour” and it is completely replenished every one to two hours.

Eye drops are the most common treatment for glaucoma. The eye drops either decrease how fast the fluid enters the eye or increase how quickly it leaves. Common eye drops that decrease the inflow are Timolol, Brimonidine and Dorzolamide. The most commonly prescribed eye drop that increases the outflow is Latanoprost.  The iStent is a tiny tube (measuring only 1 mm by 0.3 mm) that is placed in front of the iris at the edge of the eye to allow the aqueous humour to leave faster. It is the smallest implantable device in medicine.

The iStent can only be placed at the time of cataract surgery so you need to have both cataracts and mild to moderate glaucoma. If your glaucoma is very severe, you might need more extensive surgery than the iStent provides. It is made of titanium and is not magnetic so won’t interfere with your ability to have a MRI later in life.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Sounds confusing? We can talk about this more at your next eye examination. The goal of the iStent is to get you off some or all of your glaucoma medications. In the meantime, keep taking your drops as we have prescribed them and continue to have regular follow-up examinations.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeshoreVision.com.


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