Cataracts: Symptoms and Treatment

With Cataracts, My Own Private Light Show by Richard Liebmann-Smith, New York Times Contributer

By user-admin
July 6, 2016

Click on the photo to the left for a New York Times article by Richard Liebmann-Smith describing his experience before and after cataract surgery. Before the surgery the lights of the city looked like an arcade, bright and glaring, but afterwards the world was a more beautiful and realistic place!


NEW ARRIVAL AT COLUMBIA-ST. MARY’S: NEW OPERATING MICROSCOPE By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 26, 2016

It has arrived: A fabulous new operating microscope at Columbia-St. Mary’s Hospital in Mequon for eye surgery!  I started using the new Zeiss Lumera 700 microscope last month and could not be more pleased.  Now only does the eye appear clearer through the new microscope but the unit is fully integrated for ease of use.

The Lumera has a special lighting system that highlights every detail of the eye, kind of like going from a regular to a high definition view. It also has a wider depth of focusing so I can see different parts in the eye all at once without refocusing. The result is a safer procedure and a happier doctor, what’s not to like?

As if those key attributes were not enough, now we have a monitor in the room so the operating room staff can know how the surgery is proceeding. While all microscopes have a foot pedal controls the lighting and focusing, the one for Lumera has many other programmable functions to suite each individual doctor. All that and no annoying wires – it runs on Bluetooth.

Cataract surgery may be a quick procedure but it involves many small steps. When I can see better and don’t have to take the time to keep refocusing, I can concentrate of what matters: achieving the best possible outcome for my patients.

So thank you Columbia-St. Mary’s Hospital! We already have the best cataract machine there (the Alcon Centurion) and now the state-of-the art operating microscope. Their commitment to excellence in eye care is much appreciated.

For more information about cataract symptoms and surgical options, call for an appointment or visit our web site. It is not your grandmother’s procedure.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and LASIK vision correction.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


WHAT’S CATARACT SURGERY LIKE? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 1, 2016

What exactly happens during cataract surgery?  Many with cataracts are afraid to have the surgery because they don’t really know what it would be like. Just the word “surgery” scares them. It brings to mind pain, long recovery and time off from your favorite activities. Nothing could be farther from the truth with cataract surgery.

Modern cataract surgery is done without shots, stitches or patches. It takes only about 10 to 15 minutes. We use only mild I.V. sedation to relax you.  You don’t feel anything because there are numbing drops applied to the surface of the eye. Afterwards, you look pretty much the way you did on the way in: no patch over the eye, no black and blue bruising. We recommend that you take 2 days off your regular activities, one for the actual procedure and the next day to allow your vision to settle. Then the only restrictions are no eye make-up, swimming or pushing on the eye for 2 weeks.

On the day of surgery, you change into a hospital gown and then an I.V. is started. Once in the operating room you look at a bright light. There IS NO PAIN. You may see pretty colors from a prism like effect of the lens as we remove it and replace it with a tiny plastic implant.  About 30 minutes after the procedure, you go home or even out to lunch. You do need a ride as some of the sedation may still be in effect but you won’t need extra help at home.

So, breath-in and breath-out, cataracts surgery is generally a quick and easy. It is the most common operation in America and patients are thrilled with the results.  If every procedure worked as well as cataract surgery, the world would be a much better place!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK vision correction.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


“CAN I BEND OVER AFTER CATARACT SURGERY?” By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with 2 offices in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin (close to Cedarburg, Grafton, Fox Point, River Hills and other North Shore Communities)

By editor
September 22, 2015

This has got to be the most common question I hear from cataract patients. Their sister, neighbor or friend at church told them, “Be sure you don’t bend over after your cataract surgery.”  We give out specific written instructions after cataract surgery that NEVER mention not bending over but this question persists. Where did it come from and why won’t it go away?

The where it came from is easy: in the past (more than 20 years ago) cataract surgery involved making a very large incision that was almost 180 degrees across the top of the eye. While there are some surgeons who have STILL not adapted the newer techniques, 99% make a very small incision (only 2.4 mm in my case).  When the incision was much larger, bending over during the healing process put stress on that large incision and the many sutures required to close it.

Modern cataract surgery is done without stitches, patches or shots. That means that the restrictions after surgery are different too. We only have 4 rules (besides what you do with the eye drops) for the first two weeks after cataract surgery: 1) no pushing on the eye, 2) no eye makeup, 3) no swimming and 4) do wear a plastic shield over the eye at night.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

This only applies to my patients. Be sure if you have surgery with another ophthalmologist that you follow their instructions. That follows for any type of medical procedure, the instructions are intended help you have the best possible outcome. Help me make this myth go away, be sure to read your post-operative instructions but don’t read too much into them!

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery.


DR. JAY – TOP DOCTORS LIST MILWAUKEE MAGAZINE! By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
July 30, 2015

You knew that Dr. Martha Jay was a great doctor, now the annual Milwaukee Magazine “Top Doctors” list agrees. Check out the August issue for primary care doctors and specialists in the Milwaukee area who were selected for this honor.  Our patients often comment that it seems like everyone they know has had eye surgery with Dr. Jay and is thrilled with the results.  If you are ready for cataract surgery or are interested in having LASIK vision correction, call her for an evaluation to see what she can do to improve your outlook on life.

Cataract surgery may seem easy as it only takes 10-15 minutes and is pain free but there is considerable skill involved. Dr. Jay likes to say that surgery is like sailing (another of her passions) in that you learn something every time you go out. You want all that experience when you are considering a surgeon for your cataract surgery.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Jay also has considerable experience in LASIK vision correction, being the first doctor in the Milwaukee area to use a laser for refractive surgery. She exclusively offers blade-free LASIK using two lasers instead of one. This makes LASIK much safer and considerably more comfortable. There is still time this summer to have LASIK done, all you need to do is call for a free consultation to see if the procedure is right for you.

All the doctors at Lakeshore Eye Care are proud of Dr. Jay. Our team includes myself,  Dr. Deborah Costakos and Dr. Neda Esmaili.  Between the five of us we cover all age groups and all aspects eye care from general examinations and contact lenses to most types of eye surgery. Visit our web site or call for more details.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is a Optometrist specializing in general eye care including contact lens fitting. He welcomes patient off all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


BASEBALL VS FOOTBALL EYES By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
May 13, 2015

Are your eyes more like a football or a baseball?

Been following the Brewers? Baseball is not just a sport but also a way to explain the shape of your eyes.  You have “football eyes” if the front of your eyes are curved like a football. This is called astigmatism.  You have “baseball eyes” if the front of your eyes are more rounded like a baseball.

It is important to know if you have “football” or “baseball” eyes if you are considering cataract surgery.  The differences between the two determine which implant options are available to you at the time of surgery.  Cataract surgery is a very safe and relatively easy procedure to go through.  We gently remove your natural cloudy lens and replace it with a clear implant to improve your vision.

The latest advancements in cataract surgery allow us to take advantage of more implant choices than previously available. If you have football eyes, you would see better afterwards if we place a Toric implant at the time of your cataract surgery.  If you have baseball eyes, then you could benefit from a Multi-focal implant that allows you to see far away, intermediate and close up after your surgery without glasses.  These bifocal-like implants let you turn back the clock and be relatively free of glasses after your procedure.

How can you tell if you have football or baseball eyes?  How do you know which implant is optimal for you at the time of your cataract surgery?  We guide you through the options available to you during your cataract evaluation.  Remember, you only have cataract surgery once so it is important to consider all the possibilities to optimize your vision.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


LASIK VS CATARACT SURGERY: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
November 15, 2014

Confused about the difference between LASIK and cataract surgery? You are not alone. LASIK is a laser procedure intended to eliminate your need for glasses or contact lenses. Cataract surgery is done to remove the cloudy lens in the front of your eye and replace it with a clear plastic implant. If you have cataracts, LASIK is not an option for you because your vision would still be blurred afterwards due to the cloudy cataract.

LASIK is done at an outpatient laser center with mild oral sedation. We begin by using a laser to make a small flap on the surface of the eye. Once this tiny flap is lifted, we use a second laser to alter the shape of the eye to improve you vision without glasses.  Each laser is pain-free and runs for less than a minute per eye.

Cataract surgery takes place in an operating room with I.V. sedation.  We use a tiny ultrasound to liquefy and then remove the cloudy lens inside the eye, behind the colored pupil. We then replace that lens with a clear plastic implant to improve your vision.  There now are a number of implant options, all of which will be thoroughly explained at the time of your cataract evaluation. The procedure takes 10-15 minutes.

How can you tell if LASIK is a possibility for you? Just come in for a free LASIK screening exam. We will evaluate your vision and eyes to see if LASIK is right for you. How can you tell if you have cataracts? Cataract symptoms include blurred distance vision, especially at night, along with seeing halos around lights and glare on sunny days.  However, a complete eye examination is the best way to determine if cataracts are a significant problem for you. See you soon!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician and Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care including blade-free iLASIK and small incision cataract surgery.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


WHAT IS A SECONDARY CATARACT? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
October 21, 2014

A common question from patients is, “Do cataracts come back?” The answer is yes and no. Once you have cataract surgery, you do not have to go back to the operating room at a later date to repeat the procedure. What can happen is that you may develop a secondary cataract. This is a clouding behind the implant and is easily treated with a quick laser procedure.

The lens in the eye is shaped like a tiny pillow, rounded on the edges and flattened on the front and back. It is covered with a thin membrane, measuring less than 5 microns thick. At the time of cataract surgery, we carefully remove a circular area from the front of this membrane and gently vacuum out your cloudy lens. We then use this remaining membrane, known as “the bag,” to support the plastic intraocular lens which allows you to see clearly after surgery.

In about 10% of cases, this membrane becomes cloudy over time and we call it a secondary cataract.  It usually takes 3-5 years for this to happen and the symptoms are very similar to those noticed prior to the original surgery: blurred distance vision, glare and halos around lights.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

As previously mentioned, the treatment is a quick laser. You wear street clothes and put your chin on something that looks just like what we use in the office during your eye exam. Afterwards there are no activity restrictions and the potential risk for complications is minimal. So if you start to notice that your vision has become blurred several years after cataract surgery, come in and we will determine if this is your problem.  If so, you are just a quick laser away from resuming your clear vision.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK vision correction.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com


CATARACTS & MACULAR DEGENERATION By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalomologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
September 2, 2014

Many people have both cataracts and macular degeneration as both conditions are more common later in life. Cataracts are caused by a clouding of the lens in the front of the eye and are treated with surgery. Macular degeneration is an aging change in the back of the eye.  There are two types of macular degeneration: “dry” and “wet.”  The dry type is less severe and may just be noticed during a routine eye examination. The more severe wet type usually causes blurred or distorted central vision. Sometimes the wet type is treated with injections into the eye on a regular basis.

If your vision is impaired by macular degeneration and you also have cataracts, you may wonder if having cataract surgery would be of any benefit.  A recent study in the medical journal “Ophthalmology” looked at this very question.  The study followed 800 patients and came to the conclusion that cataract surgery did improve vision in patients with all levels of macular degeneration.  Expectations should be guarded, however, about how much improvement could be expected.  The retinal is like the film of a camera, so if it is damaged by macular degeneration you cannot expect to get a perfect picture even with a perfectly clear lens.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Every situation is different so the decision to proceed with cataract surgery is one that you make with the assistance of your eye physician.  While cataract surgery is a relatively quick and easy procedure, you want have reasonable expectations. We can thoroughly discuss your options and explain what visual improvement you could expect with cataract surgery the time of your next complete eye examination.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including cataract surgery and macular degeneration care. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


HAVE CATARACT SURGERY TO LIVE LONGER? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin

By lsvadmin
November 12, 2013

Last month we reported on a study that found a positive correlation between having cataract surgery and a decreased chance of hip fractures. Today’s column addresses yet another crucial study performed which found that having cataract surgery might actually extend life. The study was published in the May issue of the prestigious medical journal “Ophthalmology”.

The authors followed over 350 patients in Australia for 15 years and compared patients who were close in age and had similar general medical health conditions such as heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. Those who had cataract surgery were 40% more likely to be alive at the end of the 15 years.

Why could this be? The authors postulated that good vision is a significant factor affecting emotional and physical well-being. In short, they stated that if you see better you feel better. This leads to a more optimistic view on life and the confidence to maintain an independent lifestyle.

Cataracts cause a very gradual change in vision, sometimes so slow that the patient is not really aware of it. The lens in the front of the eye gradually yellows, decreasing the amount of light that reaches the retina in the back of the eye. It is kind of like wearing dark brown sunglasses all the time.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

A very frequent comment after cataract surgery is that everything looks so bright again – as though they are now seeing the world in high definition. Blues are more vivid and whites are whiter. So if you are “on the fence” about cataract surgery, the potential for your increased longevity is something to think about.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK vision correction.  She practices at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Drs. Josephine-Liezl Cueto and Mark German. They have offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


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