Our Doctor’s Blogs

WHAT IS A STYE? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 10, 2019

A stye (also spelled "sty") is a red, tender bump on the eyelid. The medical term for the condition is hordeolum. It develops when one or more glands at the edge of the eyelid become infected. It can occur on the inside or outside of the eyelid.   Styes are not harmful to your vision but can become quite uncomfortable and unattractive.

Initial symptoms of a stye include pain, redness, tenderness and swelling in the area. The glands around the eyelid that are affected are called meibominan glands which are sebaceous glands, otherwise known as sweat glands.  Styes are more common in people with rosacea, a skin condition with overactive sebaceous glands.

A stye results from an acute infection of these meibomian glands or may also may arise from an infected hair follicle at the base of an eyelash. The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for 90-95% of cases of styes.   A stye can also develop as a complication of a low-grade eyelid infection called blepharitis.

Treatment begins with applying warm compresses over the affected area four times per day and cleansing the area with baby shampoo twice daily.  A prescription antibiotic ointment that is safe for use around the eyes may also be necessary along with occasional use of oral antibiotics.  The stye may rupture and drain, resulting in quicker healing.  If not, occasionally lancing in the office is required. Once they resolve, it is important to continue the baby shampoo lid scrubs so they do not return.

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Eye Physician & Surgeon (Ophthalmologist) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WHY WE DO WHAT WE DO By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 4, 2019

What are all those questions, measurements and eye drops about when you come for an eye exam?  These are reasonable questions that most of us wonder about but rarely think to ask.  A complete eye exam is a thorough medical evaluation of your eyes and your vision.

We start with a comprehensive medical history because many medical conditions and medications can affect the eyes. Diabetes and high blood pressure are obvious but arthritic conditions, neurological problems and many other medical diagnoses can have an influence on the functioning of the eyes.  We then ask about any vision problems you may be having to get a sense of how your vision is affecting activities such as driving and reading.

The measuring comes in with determining your current glasses prescription and seeing if we can improve on that with a change - this is called refraction. We also check your pupils, eye movements, side vision and eye pressure.  All these factors are critical to being sure no problems such as glaucoma are present.

The reason for the dilating drops is to get a clear view of the back of your eye called the retina.  This is the only place in the body where we can directly view blood vessels which can be affected by diabetes and other problems. We also look for tears, tumors and evidence of macular degeneration.

So each and every step is important at least every 1-2 years!

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Lisa Bennett at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


MY FRIEND COULD SEE PERFECTLY RIGHT AFTER CATARACT SURGERY, WHY CAN’T I? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 30, 2019

On the first day after cataract surgery, patients have varying expectations of how well they will see. Most are happy that everything went well in surgery and that their vision is already starting to improve. Others expect perfection on day one, which is not realistic. This expectation is often fueled by a friend reporting “perfect” vision on day one. While some patients can see 20/20 on the first day after cataract surgery, slight or even significant blurriness is not uncommon at that point.

Even though cataract surgery is relatively quick, often only a 10 minute procedure, it is still an operation. Your eye needs time to heal.  If the cataract was particularly dense then sometimes the surgery is slightly longer and results in some swelling on the cornea, the clear front part of the eye. Sometimes other problems cause delayed healing such as diabetic eye disease, macular degeneration or prior other eye surgeries.

We always see you on the day after your surgery to be sure you are progressing as planned. We check you vision, eye pressure and do a brief eye examination. We also want to be sure you understand how to use the post-operative drops and what your restrictions are. We may suggest the use of over-the-counter reading glasses at that time if your cataract implant was for distance vision.

As everyone is different, everyone’s perception of “perfect” is also slightly different. We realize that cataract surgery is all new to you so don’t hesitate to call if you have any questions or concerns between your appointments. While some worry that they are bothering us to call, it is certainly not the case! We are here to help.

Dr. Martha Jay is an Eye Physician & Surgeon specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK vision correction. She practices with Dr. Lisa Bennett and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


WHAT IS CATARACT REALLY SURGERY LIKE? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 27, 2019

Have you been delaying having cataract surgery because you are apprehensive about what the experience may be like? Does just the word “surgery” scare you? Does it bring to mind pain, long recovery and time off from your favorite activities? Fear not, nothing could be farther from the truth with cataract surgery these days.

We do cataract surgery generally without shots, stitches or patches and the whole procedure takes only 10-15 minutes. We use mild I.V. sedation to relax you and numbing drops on the surface of the eye to prevent pain. Afterwards, you look pretty much the way you did on the way in: no patch over the eye, no black and blue bruising. You should take 2 days off your regular activities, one for the actual procedure and the next day to allow your vision to settle down. Then the only restrictions then are to avoid eye make-up, swimming or pushing on the eye for 2 weeks.

On the day of surgery, you change into a hospital gown and an I.V. is started. Once in the operating room, your job is to look at a bright light. You may see pretty colors like a prism as we remove your natural lens and replace it with a tiny plastic implant.  About 30 minutes after the procedure, you go home or even out to lunch. You do need a ride, as some of the sedation may still be in effect, but you won’t need extra help at home.

So, breath-in and breath-out, cataracts surgery is generally a quick and easy event. It is the most common operation in America and patients are typically thrilled with the results.  If every procedure worked as well as cataract surgery, the world would be a much better place!

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. She specializes in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


CATARACT SURGERY IMPROVES YOUR OUTLOOK ON LIFE By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon/Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 20, 2019

When you think of cataract surgery, generally the visual change that comes to mind is an improvement in clarity but there are other added benefits: you color vision improves also. Cataracts cause the lens inside your eye to turn a yellow/brown. This makes blues look darker and whites to have a yellowed appearance. Before surgery this is not very noticeable as the change is quite gradual. When we do cataract surgery, we replace the yellowed natural lens with a clear plastic implant. Then, overnight, blues appear more vivid and whites whiter!  Since we operate on one eye at a time, the color perception difference between eyes is noticeable while waiting for the second eye to have surgery. Once both eyes have the implants, however, the world looks not only clearer but more colorful too!

How do you know if you have cataracts? Generally the symptoms include blurred distance vision, especially for driving at night. Sometimes you see glare or halos around lights. The actual diagnosis has to be made by your eye doctor after a complete, dilated eye examination. There are many other possible sources of blurred vision.  Some are minor and others are more serious. You could just need an adjustment in your glasses prescription or you could have a problem with your retina such as macular degeneration.

To get started on improving your outlook on life, schedule an eye examination and we will determine how to make you see as well as possible. Should your problem be cataracts, the surgery takes only 10-15 minutes and nowadays you generally don’t have to bother with shots, stitches or patches. See you soon!

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Eye Physician & Surgeon (Ophthalmologist) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery, blade-free LASIK, glaucoma treatments, macular degeneration care, dry eye management and more. She practices at Madison Medical Eye Care with Drs. Martha Jay and James Ivanoski. They have offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


IS YOUR EYE PROBLEM AN EMERGENCY? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care - Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 19, 2019

You know that you should have your eyes examined every one to two years or more frequently if you have active eye problems such as glaucoma.  More questionable is when you should be seen right away, in other words what constitutes an eye emergency.

Sudden vision loss or decreased vision in one or both eyes is definitely an eye emergency.  Loss of vision may include:  a total blacking out of vision, missing a portion of vision (like the entire right side being gone), having a curtain come down across the vision and/or sudden blurred vision that is not resolving.  Any sudden loss of vision should be evaluated promptly to determine the cause and possible treatment.

New onset double vision should also be evaluated promptly, especially if it goes away when you cover one eye.  This may be a sign of uncontrolled diabetes, high blood pressure, multiple sclerosis or other conditions that affect the brain.

Any trauma to the eyes should always be seen as soon as possible.  Any chemicals that get in the eye should be rinsed out copiously with water for 15-30 minutes even before coming in. Injuries that cause a lot of eye pain, light sensitivity, double vision or decreased vision should be evaluated right away.

Red eyes and associated significant pain, light sensitivity or decreased vision should be seen quickly.  Some eye infections or inflammations can cause permanent vision loss if not treated promptly.

Our staff is very good at determining what constitutes an eye emergency. Give us a call if you have any doubts about whether you eye problem is an emergency and we will be sure that you get the care you need in a timely manner.

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Eye Physician & Surgeon (Ophthalmologist) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


WHAT IS CATARACT REALLY SURGERY LIKE? By Dr. Lisa Bennett, Ophthalmologist at Madision Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 16, 2019

Have you been delaying having cataract surgery because you are apprehensive about what the experience may be like? Does just the word “surgery” scare you? Does it bring to mind pain, long recovery and time off from your favorite activities? Fear not, nothing could be farther from the truth with cataract surgery these days.

We do cataract surgery generally without shots, stitches or patches and the whole procedure takes only 10-15 minutes. We use mild I.V. sedation to relax you and numbing drops on the surface of the eye to prevent pain. Afterwards, you look pretty much the way you did on the way in: no patch over the eye, no black and blue bruising. You should take 2 days off your regular activities, one for the actual procedure and the next day to allow your vision to settle down. Then the only restrictions then are to avoid eye make-up, swimming or pushing on the eye for 2 weeks.

On the day of surgery, you change into a hospital gown and an I.V. is started. Once in the operating room, your job is to look at a bright light. You may see pretty colors like a prism as we remove your natural lens and replace it with a tiny plastic implant.  About 30 minutes after the procedure, you go home or even out to lunch. You do need a ride, as some of the sedation may still be in effect, but you won’t need extra help at home.

So, breath-in and breath-out, cataracts surgery is generally a quick and easy event. It is the most common operation in America and patients are typically thrilled with the results.  If every procedure worked as well as cataract surgery, the world would be a much better place!

Dr. Lisa Bennett is an Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski. She manages medical and surgical eye conditions such as cataracts, LASIK vision correction, glaucoma, macular degeneration, dry eyes and more.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


FLEX PLANS & LASIK for 2020 By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 10, 2019

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Another summer annoyed with contacts and glasses but worried how LASIK might fit your budget?  If that sounds like you, don’t overlook the savings offered by Flexible Spending or Health Savings Accounts.  While not a component of all benefit packages, many employers do provide this option to utilize pre-tax income for medical procedures such as LASIK.  The rules vary but most plans require a fall commitment for the following year.  Check with your Human Resources Officer to determine your specific deadline.

Even if one of these plans is not an option for you, LASIK actually saves you money compared to staying in contacts and/or glasses. You may not realize it but those expenses add up: If you are now 30 years-old and wear 2 week disposable contacts, you can expect to spend $21,900 over the rest of your life on contacts, glasses and solutions!

Many but all people are good candidates for blade-free LASIK. That’s why a LASIK screening exam is critical before committing Flex funds for coming year. This complimentary evaluation involves critical measurements of your vision and your eyes to determine if LASIK is meant for you.  You’ll learn a lot about LASIK and have a chance to get acquainted with our great Madison Medical Eye Care team, now even better with the addition of Dr. Lisa Bennett.

Plan ahead to improve your outlook on life in 2020! Call today to arrange your free, no-pressure LASIK screening exam.  It just might be that 2020 is your year for 20/20!

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com

 


BLUE BLOCKERS By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 23, 2019

Blue blocker glasses are a hot topic in eye care.  These amber tinted sunglasses reduce glare and protect the eyes from ultraviolet light (invisible radiation from the sun that causes sunburn) and visible blue light.

For years we have known that ultraviolet light (invisible radiation from the sun that causes sunburn) can accelerate age related eye problems like cataracts, skin cancer, and macular degeneration.  We recommend that everybody wear sunglasses (including blue blockers) when outdoors to protect the eyes from ultraviolet light.

Now studies are being done on visible blue light and the effects on the eyes.   There is no conclusive evidence that blue light from hand held devices and computer screens damage the eyes in the same way that ultraviolet light does.  Our computers and phones are not causing macular degeneration and cataracts.  We do not recommend specific blue blocking glasses for computer use, but sometimes a light amber tint may improve comfort (reduce eye strain and glare) when viewing a computer screen.

The blue light from computers and hand held devices has been shown to affect sleep cycles.  It is recommended to avoid screen time 1-2 hours before bedtime.  Lack of sleep affects overall health including eye health

Dr. James Ivanoski

Eye strain and dry eye are worsened by excessive screen time.  It is recommended to take a break from computer work every 20 minutes to look at a farther away object for at least 20 seconds.  Blue blocker glasses are a good thing since they also protect from the harmful ultraviolet light, but are not necessary for looking at computer screens or phones.

Dr. James is an Optometrist practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He specializes in comprehensive eye care for all ages and accepts most insurance plans.  He particularly welcomes contact lens wearers who have been having difficulties getting the right fit or vision from their contacts in the past.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


MORE EVIDENCE FOR THE iSTENT By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 21, 2019

We have been recommending the iStent at the time of cataract surgery over the last few years for our patients who have both cataracts and glaucoma.  The purpose of the iStent is to increase the flow of fluid out of the eye in order to decrease eye pressure. Glaucoma is a condition where the fluid in the eye is either coming in too fast or leaving too slowly.  The buildup of pressure can cause permanent vision loss so is generally treated with eye drops.

The iStent is a tiny device, in fact it is the smallest implantable device in medicine measuring only 230 microns by 360 microns. As you may remember, there are only 1000 microns in a millimeter so that means it is only around ¼ by 1/3 of a millimeter.  After the cataract is removed and the lens inserted, we have the patient turn their head to one side and then place two of these iStents at the edge of the eye. You cannot see them without special mirrors.

When compared to cataract surgery alone, we know that the iStent does generally result in lower eye pressure. A new study just came out looked at if there was a difference in the number of glaucoma eye drops patients used after cataract surgery and found that those with the iStent had a reduction even if they were using 3 or more drops. In fact, the more the drops used the bigger the drop in the number required. This was reported in the medical journal Ophthalmology in January.  The data came from a managed care network and involved almost 3000 patients.

These results mirror what we have found also with this remarkable device. We can talk about whether the iStent is an option for you at your cataract evaluation.

Dr. Martha Jay is an Eye Physician & Surgeon practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. She specializes in small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


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