Dr. Mark German’s Blogs

Goodbye from Dr. Mark German - Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 27, 2018

Dr. Mark E. GermanTo my dear patients, it has been my honor and privilege to have spent the last 18 years partnering with you to ensure that you enjoy the best ocular health possible.  Many of you have become more than patients as we have shared our experiences, memories and stories.  It was not an easy decision to step away from this practice and from you. But, sadly, April 26th, 2018 was my last day at Madison Medical Eye Care.

After 31 years in optometry, I will be embarking on new adventures as my wife pursues her law career in Nevada.  As many of you know, she recently returned to school to get her law degree.  Now it is time for me to allow her to follow her dreams as she has followed mine for the last 31 years.

Please be assured that your care will continue to be the top priority for the doctors and staff at Madison Medical Eye Care.  Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski will take excellent care of you.  Dr. Ivanoski, the other optometrist on staff, will be taking over many of my patients and comes with my personal recommendation.  He is a friend as well as my colleague and will be happy to deliver any messages you may have for me.

I am happy to say the transition from Lakeshore Eye Care to Madison Medical Affiliates is now complete.  It was a seamless transition thanks to the dedicated staff of both practices. My decision to leave was not due to the transition and had in fact been in the works for several years.

Thank you again for entrusting your care to me.  It has indeed been my pleasure.  I wish you all the very best in the future.

 


“DO I HAVE TO HAVE THOSE DILATING DROPS TODAY?” By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 14, 2017

When we prepare to put dilating drops in during a complete eye examination, we often hear “Not today, I have too much to do!”  The problem is that dilation is a major part of the eye examination.  Without it, you have only had the front part of your eyes examined.  Having an eye examination without dilating drops is like going to the gynecologist or primary care doctor without taking your clothes off!

We use the dilating drops to get a better view of the retina in the back of the eye and the blood vessels that overly it.  The eye is the only place in the body where we can directly see these tiny blood vessels which can be affected by high blood pressure, diabetes and many other medical conditions.  We are also looking for retinal tears or masses that cannot be seen through a small pupil.

Most people can go about their regular day after dilation if they have sunglasses.  The problem comes with reading but if you are already in bifocals, your reading should not be too impaired.  Most people are back to normal within 3-4 hours after the exam.

So just plan ahead.  If you are scheduled for a complete eye examination and find it difficult to function with dilating drops, arrange your schedule accordingly.  As long as you are having your eyes examined, you might as well have us evaluate your whole eye and not just the front part. At lease we don’t make you take your clothes off!

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an Optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Drs. Martha Jay and James Ivanoski. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 

 


ARMS TOO SHORT? By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 22, 2017

Are you over 40? Are you having problems seeing your cell phone and the tiny print on medicine bottles? That's the start of "presbyopia." What’s happening is that your lens, located behind the colored iris, has become gradually firmer as the protein inside breaks down. As a result, the tiny muscles around it are unable to change the shape as easily as before. The result is slower focusing at different distances. Almost everyone experiences this between the ages of 44 and 46 years-old to the point where they need do something about it.

What can you do? While you cannot stop the process but there are a number of strategies to allow comfortable reading. If you have very good distance vision without glasses or wear contact lenses, you may be able to get by with over-the-counter reading glasses. They come in powers from +1.00 up to about +3.00. At first, the lower powers are sufficient but you then need to gradually ramp up as you get older.

Another strategy is the use of bifocal glasses. With those you look through the top of the glasses to see far away and then look down to read. There are even bifocal contact lenses available. Another potential contact lens option is the use of "mono-vision" contact lenses. With this strategy we set one contact lens for distance vision and the other for near. Mono-vision also works well with LASIK vision correction.

Even though you may be able to get by with reading glasses off the rack, don’t neglect your medical eye care. Schedule an appointment so we can thoroughly evaluate your eyes assist you in determining the best reading option for you.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


BELL’S PALSY AND YOUR EYES By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 13, 2017

You experience a sudden weakness on one side of your face. It looks like you have had a stroke but it is probably Bell’s palsy. This condition is generally due to swelling of the nerve responsible for movement in your face (the “facial nerve”) and not a blood clot like a stroke.
The cause of the swelling is generally not known but the problem usually resolves without treatment in up to 84% of patients. The resolution starts about 3 weeks after the onset of the paralysis and may take up to 3 months. Oral steroids are sometimes used to speed up the process.

If the Bell’s palsy results in problems closing one eye, you should be followed by your eye care professional to be sure not damage the eye.
The key is keeping the cornea, or front part of the eye, lubricated. Frequent tear drops, an ointment at night and even taping the eye closed at night may be necessary.

Bell’s palsy is more common in diabetics, those with a family history of the condition and pregnant women. It can be associated with shingles in the ear canal or other problems.

If you think you have Bell’s palsy, you should first be evaluated by your primary care physician. They will then determine if you need to have an eye care professional involved to coordinate your care. Do you have other questions about your eyes or vision? Give us a call.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German practices general optometry at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


YOU HAVE IRITIS? WHY WAS IT MISSED ELSEWHERE? By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 13, 2017

If your eyes are red, you usually think it's an infection. While that may be true, there are many other causes of red eyes including injuries, allergies or a lesser known condition called iritis (pronounced eye-ritis). Iritis is often overlooked because you need the special equipment in an eye doctors' office to make the diagnosis. If misdiagnosed, it may be assumed that you have an eye infection and antibiotic eye drops prescribed. Then it is only after that treatment is ineffective that the patient may be referred to an eye doctor.

Iritis in not an infection. It is an inflammation of the inside of your eye, much like arthritis is an inflammation of your joints. It is treated with steroid eye drops and possibly dilating drops. The key to telling the difference between iritis and an eye infection is where the redness occurs. With iritis, the redness is usually in a ring around the colored part of the eye. Iritis is also associated with extreme light sensitivity. With an infection, the redness usually involves the whole white part of the eye and there may also be a discharge.

If untreated, iritis can lead to vision loss due to swelling in the back of the eye, glaucoma, cataracts or an inability of your pupils to enlarge in the dark. When determining the cause of the iritis, it is sometimes necessary to send you back to your primary care doctor for a medical evaluation which may include blood tests and possibly a chest x-ray. Iritis may recur if the underlying cause of the inflammation is not identified and properly treated. Many times, however, the cause of the inflammation is not determined.

Is it time for your complete eye examination or do you have a specific eye problem? Give us a call. We have 3 doctors and two locations in Ozaukee County for your convenience. Our office hours are Monday through Friday, from 8:30 to 5:00.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an Optometrist practicing with Drs. Martha Jay and James Ivanoski at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


NOVEMBER IS DIABETIC EYE DISEASE MONTH By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 31, 2016
The Wisconsin Council of the Blind and Visually Impaired recognizes November as “Diabetic Eye Disease Month.” The purpose of this designation is to increase awareness about how diabetes can potentially affect your eyes and how to prevent it.
We like to see diabetics at least yearly for a complete eye examination. That includes dilating drops so we can look into the back of your eyes to evaluate your retinas. We are looking for abnormal blood vessels, bleeding or swelling of this delicate tissue. If these problems are detected early, treatments such as lasers or injections are more effective.
Vision loss from diabetic eye disease is preventable. Tight control of your blood sugar is the key. This means carefully monitoring at home and/or at your doctor’s office. The hemoglobin A1c is a simple blood test that measures of how well controlled your blood sugars have been over the prior 90 days. Primary care physicians generally like to see values on this test in the 6 range. Of equal importance is early detection of diabetic eye disease as that improves your chances of protecting your vision.
We stay in close contact with your primary care physician with annual reports about your eyes so they can be fully aware if diabetes has affected them. The eyes actually serve as a “window” into the rest of your body: Diabetes has the potential of affecting small blood vessels elsewhere such as the heart, kidneys and feet. If your eyes are free if diabetic changes, then that is generally good news for the rest of you.
Are you a diabetic and have gone more than a year since your last eye examination? Time to call to set one up, see you soon!
Dr. Mark E. German Dr. Mark German is an Optometrist practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.
For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

HOW TO STAY OUT OF TROUBLE WITH YOUR CONTACTS By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 3, 2016

Contact lenses are a great alternative to glasses for sports and everyday wear. You can avoid fogged up glasses, expand your peripheral or side vision, wear off-the-rack sunglasses or non-prescription sports goggles, and avoid the annoying “slide down the nose” syndrome.  Contacts, however, do take a bit more care than just throwing on a pair of glasses each morning.

Staying out of trouble with contacts starts with being sure you have an accurate fit and prescription by having a complete eye exam every one to two years. If your eyes hurt, become red or your vision changes suddenly then an emergent appointment is indicated as something more serious may be occurring.

As for daily care, start by making sure that your lens case is very clean. Wash it out daily and let it air dry in a clean place. Change the solutions every day. Be sure you are not just using saline to clean your contacts.  You need a product that disinfects as well as cleans the contacts to prevent eye infections.  In addition, discard the contacts according to the schedule advised by your eye doctor. Finally, NEVER sleep in your contacts as this greatly increases your risk of developing a severe infection called a corneal ulcer.

Dr. Mark E. GermanIf your goal is to wake up with clear vision in the morning and avoid taking the time to properly care for your contacts, then you might want to consider seeing my colleague Dr. Martha Jay about LASIK vision correction. As for avoiding problems such as infections and injuries, you may be surprised to learn that we see far more problems in contact lens patients than in those who have had LASIK.

Dr. Mark German specializes in hard-to-fit contact lens patients and comprehensive eye care for all ages. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


DR. JAY – TOP DOCTORS LIST MILWAUKEE MAGAZINE AGAIN! By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 8, 2016

You knew that Dr. Martha Jay was a great doctor, now the annual Milwaukee Magazine “Top Doctors” list agrees for a second year in a row. Check out the August issue for primary care doctors and specialists in the Milwaukee area who were selected for this honor.  Our patients often comment that it seems like everyone they know has had eye surgery with Dr. Jay and is thrilled with the results.  If you are ready for cataract surgery or are interested in having LASIK vision correction, call her for an evaluation to see what she can do to improve your outlook on life.

Cataract surgery may seem easy as it only takes 10-15 minutes and is pain free but there is considerable skill involved. Dr. Jay likes to say that surgery is like sailing (another of her passions) in that you learn something every time you go out. You want all that experience when you are considering a surgeon for your cataract surgery.

Dr. Jay also has considerable experience in LASIK vision correction, being the first doctor in the Milwaukee area to use a laser for refractive surgery. She exclusively offers blade-free LASIK using two lasers instead of one. This makes LASIK much safer and considerably more comfortable. There is still time this summer to have LASIK done, all you need to do is call for a free consultation to see if the procedure is right for you.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

All the doctors at Lakeshore Eye Care are proud of Dr. Jay. Our team includes myself, Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski. Between the three of us we cover all age groups and all aspects eye care from general examinations to contact lenses to eye surgery. Visit our web site or call for more details.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


COMPUTER VISION SYNDROME By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
July 12, 2016

Computers seem to be taking over our lives and along with that has come an increase in computer related vision complaints. The problem even has a name: “Computer Vision Syndrome.”  The symptoms include burning, itching, dryness or redness of the eyes along with blurred vision.  Usually the complaints begin after about 3 or more hours of computer use.  Other non-vision related problems include tension headaches and lower back pain.

70-90% of those who use computers on a regular basis for work or play experience this syndrome.  Most of the vision symptoms are due to dry eyes.  The association between dry eyes and computer usage is thought to be due to decreased blink rate. Normally we blink about 17 times per minute but with computers use we tend to “stare” and drop the blink rate down to 12-15 times per minute.

What’s the solution? The 20-20-20 rule for start: Every 20 minutes take 20 seconds to refocus 20 feet away. Set the monitor so your eyes are lined up near the top of the screen, requiring you to look down slightly to see the center.  This decreases how exposed or open your eyes are and relaxes your neck. Your screen should also be brighter than the room lighting, so dim the room lights and avoid bright sunlight. Finally, if consciously increasing your blink rate does not help then use tear supplements to improve your comfort and vision.

Other options can be discussed at your next comprehensive eye examination or sooner should there be a more urgent need.  Adapted from “Computer Vision Syndrome Affects Millions” by Jane Brody, New York Times 5/30/16.

Dr. Mark E. GermanDr. Mark German is an optometrist practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. James Ivanoski. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


“DO I HAVE TO HAVE THOSE DILATING DROPS TODAY?” By Dr. Mark German, Optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 10, 2016

When we prepare to put dilating drops in during a complete eye examination, we often hear “Not today, I have too much to do!”  The problem is that dilation is a major part of the eye examination.  Without it, you have only had the front part of your eyes examined.  Having an eye examination without dilating drops is like going to the gynecologist or primary care doctor without taking your clothes off!

We use the dilating drops to get a better view of the retina in the back of the eye and the blood vessels that overly it.  The eye is the only place in the body where we can directly see these tiny blood vessels which can be affected by high blood pressure, diabetes and many other medical conditions.  We are also looking for retinal tears or masses that cannot be seen through a small pupil.

Most people can go about their regular day after dilation if they have sunglasses.  The problem comes with reading but if you are already in bifocals, your reading should not be too impaired.  Most people are back to normal within 3-4 hours after the exam.

Dr. Mark E. GermanSo just plan ahead.  If you are scheduled for a complete eye examination and find it difficult to function with dilating drops, arrange your schedule accordingly.  As long as you are having your eyes examined, you might as well have us evaluate your whole eye and not just the front part. At lease we don’t make you take your clothes off!

Dr. Mark German is an optometrist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals. He welcomes patients of all ages to his practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


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