Dr. Martha Jay’s Blogs

HOLIDAY LIGHT HALOS By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
December 20, 2018

Holiday season is here along with many displays of decorative exterior lighting.  While they can be quite beautiful, sometimes how the holiday lights appear can alert you that something might not be quite right with your vision.

Starbursts and halos are a common vision complaint when looking at holiday lights or even headlights all year long.  We use the term “starburst” to describe what you see when a pinpoint of light appears to have radiating spokes coming off it. The term “halo” describes when you see circles around a light source. Both symptoms can be due to something as benign as not having the most up-to-date glasses or contact lens prescription to more serious problems such as cataracts. If you are noticing these symptoms, during the holiday season or anytime during the year, your first move is to call us for a comprehensive eye examination so we can determine the cause and take care of it.

Cataracts are a clouding of the lens in the front of the eye, behind the colored iris.  They can make lights appear dim, cause glare or make colors appear dull.  Cataracts are removed with a 10 minute outpatient surgery generally these days without shots, stitches or patches. The surgery involves replacing the cloudy lens with a clear plastic lens implant.  There are a number of options for these implants which will be discussed should this be found to be your problem.

Take time this holiday season to enjoy the many wonderful lighting displays.  But if the lights appear a little different this year, consider getting an eye examination. Your problem could be cataracts but it could also just be that your glasses need updating or that you have dry eyes. Have a very happy holiday season!

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. She practices at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


A GIFT FOR OUR CATARACT PATIENTS By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
December 14, 2018

This holiday season we have a gift for our cataract patients: we have simplified the drops you use after cataract surgery! We heard you when you said the surgery was nothing but the drops were quite a chore. We had been using three types of drops, each in their own bottle. Not only was it annoying to deal with all the bottles but Insurance coverage for the drops was inconsistent, some plans covered them and some did not. That meant that not only did you have the fuss with three different bottles, you might have had to contend with a significant out-of-pocket expense to purchase them.

Over the last few months we have been transitioning to an all-in-one eye drop bottle for our cataract patients. A pharmacy combines all three kinds of drops in a single bottle for your convenience. You get the benefit of a steroid drop (like prednisone), a strong antibiotic drop and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drop (like Advil) all in one. The new product is called Pred-Gati-Brom as it contains Prednisolone (the steroid), Gatifloxacin (the antibiotic) and Bromfenac (the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory). All three are necessary to be sure your eye heals well after cataract surgery so you can enjoy the best possible vision.

Convenience is one thing but what about cost? The new drops are very reasonably prices at $50 per bottle which is enough for one eye.  We dispense the drops in the office when you come in for the pre-operative measurements prior to surgery. Compared with the hundreds of dollars patients were spending on the three separate drops, this is quite a deal.

Easier to use and costing less, what’s not to like? MERRY CHRISTMAS, enjoy your delayed present on us.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. She practices at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


DR. JAY & DR. IVANOSKI and OTHER MADISON MEDICAL AFFILIATES PHYSICIANS ARE “TOP DOCS” AGAIN IN THE MILWAUKEE MAGAZINE SURVEY By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 27, 2018

While I have long made the list of the “Top Docs” in the Milwaukee Magazine survey, they have now included Optometrists also so Dr. Ivanoski gets to share the honor! Check out the November issue for primary care doctors and specialists in the Milwaukee area who were selected by their peers as outstanding health care providers.

We have lots of company in the survey with our new colleagues at Madison Medical Affiliates. Those doctors made the list in Endocrinology, Dermatology, Colon & Rectal Surgery, Breast Surgery, Gastroenterology, General Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Sleep Medicine, Urology and Vascular Surgery.  We are very pleased to be in the company of such well respected physicians.

It has been almost a year since Lakeshore Eye Care became part of Madison Medical Affiliates and our staff and patients would agree that the transition has been seamless. We still have the same “Top Docs,” same great staff and same two locations in Ozaukee County (Mequon and Saukville). What has changed is that I’m not spending time managing the practice, leaving that up to the able staff at Madison Medical Affiliates.

While survey results are nice, the real purpose of our day is providing our patients with the best possible vision whether it is through glasses, contact lenses, refractive surgery or cataract surgery. Dr. Ivanoski and myself provide comprehensive eye care for the whole family and accept most insurance plans. For more eye care information, visit our www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com or call 262-241-1919.


MIGRAINES CAN AFFECT YOUR VISION By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 15, 2018

You are having a rough day. All of a sudden your vision becomes blurred and you see moving zigzags in your side vision. They may be black and white, silver or in brilliant color. Over 30 minutes to an hour, the zigzags gradually move away and break up. Your vision returns to normal leaving you wondering what happened.

The above description is classic for a visual migraine. Visual migraines are similar to the aura people with migraine headaches experience but, lucky for you, no headache followed. Visual migraines are more common in people who had migraine headaches when they were younger or who have a family history of migraine headaches.

What should you do? First of all, if this is new for you a thorough eye examination is recommended to be sure of the diagnosis. Should the problem occur more than once, look for triggers that might bring them on and then try to avoid them. It could be stress, fatigue, bright lights, hormonal changes, red wine or certain foods.

Visual migraines leave no lasting defect in your vision. They are caused by spasms of blood vessels in the vision part of your brain, just like migraine headaches. There is generally no treatment as they quickly resolve. Should they occur so frequently that they interfere with your daily life, certain blood pressure medications can be prescribed by your primary care doctor.

Feel free to schedule an appointment should you have any concerns. The first time this happens it can be very frightening. We are here to help.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified Eye Physician & Surgeon specializing in blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. She practices at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


DOES YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE AFFECT YOUR EYE PRESSURE? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 1, 2018

As far as your health is concerned, the two times you hear about “pressure” is with blood pressure and eye pressure. An abnormally high blood pressure could lead to heart disease or stokes. An abnormally high eye pressure could lead to vision loss from glaucoma.  A logical question is whether or not the two are directly related.

It turns out that the two are related. A 2005 article in the British Journal of Ophthalmology reported on the Beaver Dam study. This is a Wisconsin based long term study following thousands of people in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. The study looked at diastolic (the low number) blood pressure and systolic (the higher number) blood pressure and compared it to the patient’s eye pressure. The results found that for every 10 mm Hg increase in diastolic blood pressure, there was a corresponding 0.6 mm Hg increase in eye pressure. The effects of systolic blood pressure on eye pressure were less. For every 10 mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure, there was a 0.3 mm Hg increase in eye pressure.

Is this important? First and foremost you concern should be maintaining a healthy blood pressure. This is something for you and your primary care provider to determine. As for eye pressure, you would have to have a very significant elevation in blood pressure to cause significant vision damage from glaucoma but it could certainly happen.

This is just another reason to keep on top of your general health care as it can affect your eye pressure too. Other potential eye problems from uncontrolled blood pressure include small strokes behind the eye and broken or blocked blood vessels in the eye. Take care of yourself and make your eyes happy too!

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Eye Physician & Surgeon (Ophthalmologist) practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. She specialized in eye surgery including blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


FLEX PLANS AND LASIK By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 19, 2018

Did you just spend another summer annoyed with your contacts and glasses?  Have you been considering LASIK but are not sure how to fit it into your budget?  If that sounds like you, don’t overlook the savings offered by Flexible Spending or Health Savings Accounts.  While not part of all benefit packages, many employers do provide this option to utilize pre-tax income for medical procedures such as LASIK.  The rules vary but most plans require a fall commitment for the following year.  Check with your Human Resources Officer to determine your specific deadline.

Even if one of these plans is not an option for you, LASIK actually saves you money compared to staying in contacts and glasses. You may not realize it but those expenses add up: If you are now 30 years-old and wear 2 week disposable contacts, you can expect to spend $21,900 over the rest of your life on contacts, glasses and solutions!

Most, but not all people are good candidates for blade-free LASIK. That’s why a LASIK screening exam is critical before committing Flex funds for coming year. This complimentary evaluation involves critical measurements of your vision and your eyes to determine if LASIK is right for you.  You’ll learn a lot about LASIK and have a chance to get acquainted with our great team at Madison Medical Eye Care.

Plan ahead to improve your outlook on life in 2019 by calling today to arrange your free, no-pressure LASIK screening exam.  See you soon!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay was the first ophthalmologist in the Milwaukee area to perform laser vision correction and has been at the forefront of this advanced technology every since. She practices at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.

From more information about Dr. Martha Jay and LASIK vision correction, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


DARK CHOCOLATE WINS THE VISION TEST By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
September 5, 2018

This headline particularly caught my eye: “New benefit of dark chocolate could be in sight, literally.” It was reporting on a study published in the medical journal Ophthalmology that analyzed vision parameters in volunteers after they consumed either a dark chocolate bar or a milk chocolate bar. The dark chocolate group had an improvement in contrast sensitivity (the ability to detect line separations) and vision when measured two hours later compared to the milk chocolate group.

What is the possible mechanism of this finding? Dark chocolate contains antioxidants known as flavonoids. These naturally occurring compounds have been linked to a number of health benefits including decreased inflammation; improved blood flow; along with increasing the “good” HDL cholesterol and decreasing the “bad” LDL cholesterol. Dark chocolate also contains a number of minerals such as iron, magnesium, copper and manganese.  Dark chocolate has been linked with improved brain function, decreased heart disease risk and protecting the skin from sun damage.

As a frequent reader of this column, you are also well aware of other things you can do to protect your vision including NOT smoking, incorporating plenty of leafy green vegetables in your diet and wearing sunglasses. These three lifestyle choices will have a much greater impact on your vision in the future than an occasional dark chocolate bar!

As with most things in life, too much of anything is generally not healthy. Watch the sugar content in those dark chocolate bars and do not overdue it.  The take home point of the study is that milk chocolate is just not worth the calories – go for the good stuff!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist (Eye Physician & Surgeon) specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


WHAT IS CATARACT SURGERY LIKE? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
July 13, 2018

What exactly happens during cataract surgery?  Many with cataracts are afraid to have the surgery because they don’t really know what it would be like. Just the word “surgery” scares them. It brings to mind pain, long recovery and time off from your favorite activities. Nothing could be farther from the truth with cataract surgery.

Modern cataract surgery is done without shots, stitches or patches. It takes only about 10 to 15 minutes. We use only mild I.V. sedation to relax you.  You don’t feel anything because there are numbing drops applied to the surface of the eye. Afterwards, you look pretty much the way you did on the way in: no patch over the eye, no black and blue bruising. We recommend that you take 2 days off your regular activities, one for the actual procedure and the next day to allow your vision to settle. Then the only restrictions are no eye make-up, swimming or pushing on the eye for 2 weeks.

On the day of surgery, you change into a hospital gown and then an I.V. is started. Once in the operating room you look at a bright light. There IS NO PAIN. You may see pretty colors from a prism like effect of the lens as we remove it and replace it with a tiny plastic implant.  About 30 minutes after the procedure, you go home or even out to lunch. You do need a ride as some of the sedation may still be in effect but you won’t need extra help at home.

So, breath-in and breath-out, cataracts surgery is generally a quick and easy. It is the most common operation in America and patients are thrilled with the results.  If every procedure worked as well as cataract surgery, the world would be a much better place!

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 

 


SMOKING AND “WET” MACULAR DEGENERATION By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 20, 2018

Our patients who smoke know that we discuss the potential impact of this habit on vision at each and every appointment. There is even a reporting measure on this topic required for getting credit from Medicare for using electronic medical records. I also give out the “Handout of Shame” to encourage quitting.

Now yet another study has come out linking smoking to “wet” macular degeneration.  Macular degeneration is an aging change that affects the delicate retinal tissue in the back of the eye. It is the leading cause of legal blindness for those over 65 years-old. There is a “dry” or mild type and also a much more severe “wet” type. The wet type results from fluid leaking forward under the retina damaging the critical central part of your vision used for reading. Those with the wet form often have to get injections in their eyes every 3-4 months in an attempt to improve their vision.

A study came out last fall in the British Journal of Ophthalmology, a respected medical journal, linking smoking and wet macular degeneration. They analyzed the data of over half a million South Korean men between the ages of 40 and 79 years-old. Apparently few women smoke in Korea so they were not included. Wet macular degeneration risk was 50% higher in smokers than those who had never smoked. Both the length of time someone smoked and the amount they smoked was significant.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

You know that smoking is bad for your heart, breathing and pocketbook. Now there is yet another study liking vison loss to this habit. Your primary care physician would be thrilled to assist you in making this important lifestyle change to invest in your future medical and visual health.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and blade free LASIK. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


YOU WANT TO PUT PLUGS IN MY EYELIDS?? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 14, 2018

When we suggest punctal “plugs” to a patient, the reaction varies from curiosity to outright panic.  While they are quite routine dry eye care, many patients have not heard of them.  The goal of the plugs is to keep the tears you have in your eyes longer, decreasing your need for tear supplements and improving your eye comfort.

On the upper and lower eyelids in each eye, there are a total of 4 small openings towards the nose which are called puncta.  Each leads to a tiny tube that drains your tears into the back of your nose. The bottom ones carry about 2/3 of the tears and the top the other 1/3. If we block the bottom puncta in each eye, your eyes stay wetter. The plugs are very small, about 1-2 mm, and made of soft plastic. They are easily inserted in the office in a matter of seconds.

Generally we do not suggest plugs at the first signs of dry eyes. We try artificial tears first. If the patient feels that they need to use the tears more than 4 times per day or they are not providing any relief, then plugs or a prescription product called Restasis or Xiidra may be suggested. Those products change the quality of the tears so they coat the eye better. As noted above, the plugs change the quantity of the tears. Sometimes both quality and quantity need improvement. Should that be the case, then plugs and Restasis or Xiidra might be used together.

The symptoms of dry eyes include blurred reading vision at the end of the day, feeling like there is something in the eyes, eye fatigue, red eyes and more. Give us a call if you need relief from this common eye problem.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. She welcomes patients of all ages into her practice and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


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