Dr. Martha Jay’s Blogs

DARK CIRCLES UNDER YOUR EYES? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
April 4, 2016

What’s that all about and what can you do about it? Those dark circles can have many sources from heredity, allergies, smoking or dehydration.  As for heredity, you cannot do much about that but the other sources can be remedied.

If you have allergies, treat them with over-the-counter medication or ask your doctor for stronger products if they are not doing the trick. Be sure you do not rub your eyes as that just makes the circles worse. You could even try the Nedi pot to clear your system of the annoying substances that are making you miserable. If you smoke, you probably realize the toll it takes on your skin. The tiny blood vessels that nourish your skin are deprived of oxygen so the elasticity goes down – just another reason to quit. Sun exposure is another culprit so be sure to wear hats and sunglasses.

The biggest preventable cause of dark circles under the eyes is dehydration. If you eat a salty meal the fluid is pulled from the skin around your eyes revealing the dark circles. Excessive alcohol does the same thing. That’s where the “rough night” comments come from. Not getting enough sleep can also contribute.

What can you do about it once those circles appear? Get hydrated for one. Cooling the area is another. You can use cold compresses (cucumbers, ice packs, cold spoons). What you use does not matter, it is the cool temperature. There are many products sold for this problem, use at your own risk and be sure they are safe to use around your eyes. You can also get improvement by sleeping on several pillows. Finally there is the use of concealer, just be sure not to rub it on too aggressively.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including blade-free LASIK vision correction and small incision cataract surgery.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


LET ME INTRODUCE YOU… By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 28, 2016

From what I hear from our patients, what really stands out about Lakeshore Eye Care is our amazing staff. Not a day goes by without someone commenting on how nice they are and how much they learned from them. From the first phone call, throughout your exams or surgeries and finally through the quagmire of insurance billing, they have you covered.  Our doctors could not possibly get by without them and are very pleased that they have made an impression on you also.

Some especially important individuals who help facilitate your care are our Certified Ophthalmic Assistants and Technicians (COAs/COTs).  They work under our doctor’s direction and supervision to gather the pertinent information we need at each and every examination. They listen to your concerns and condense that information so we can effectively address them.  You leave with solutions for better vision and eye comfort.  Not only that but you learn a lot about how your eyes work too!

How did the technicians learn all this?  All of our COAs/COTs have completed an intense independent study course with clinical training that lasts at least two years.  They then have to pass either the COA or the COT level examinations. Furthermore, they participate in Continuing Medical Education courses every year to build their knowledge and skills with new technologies and developments.  Advances in medical and surgical eye care are constantly occurring and our techs make sure that they never get left behind.

Thank you techs, we could not do our job without you! And thank you kind patients for taking the time to complement them and other staff members on jobs well done.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care.  She is proud to work with all our techs: Catherine, Jodi, Leah, Amy, Laura and Lisa.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


WHAT’S CATARACT SURGERY LIKE? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 1, 2016

What exactly happens during cataract surgery?  Many with cataracts are afraid to have the surgery because they don’t really know what it would be like. Just the word “surgery” scares them. It brings to mind pain, long recovery and time off from your favorite activities. Nothing could be farther from the truth with cataract surgery.

Modern cataract surgery is done without shots, stitches or patches. It takes only about 10 to 15 minutes. We use only mild I.V. sedation to relax you.  You don’t feel anything because there are numbing drops applied to the surface of the eye. Afterwards, you look pretty much the way you did on the way in: no patch over the eye, no black and blue bruising. We recommend that you take 2 days off your regular activities, one for the actual procedure and the next day to allow your vision to settle. Then the only restrictions are no eye make-up, swimming or pushing on the eye for 2 weeks.

On the day of surgery, you change into a hospital gown and then an I.V. is started. Once in the operating room you look at a bright light. There IS NO PAIN. You may see pretty colors from a prism like effect of the lens as we remove it and replace it with a tiny plastic implant.  About 30 minutes after the procedure, you go home or even out to lunch. You do need a ride as some of the sedation may still be in effect but you won’t need extra help at home.

So, breath-in and breath-out, cataracts surgery is generally a quick and easy. It is the most common operation in America and patients are thrilled with the results.  If every procedure worked as well as cataract surgery, the world would be a much better place!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery and blade-free LASIK vision correction.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


OPHTHALMOLOGISTS WERE AMERICA’S FIRST BOARD CERTIFIED PHYSICIANS By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
February 15, 2016

Nearly one hundred years ago, in December of 1916, the first group of pioneering eye surgeons traveled to Memphis, Tennessee to demonstrate their commitment to excellence in patient care.  They sat for the first board certification examination of any physician specialty.  Back then it was called the American Board for Ophthalmic Examinations.

The American Board of Otolaryngology (Ear, Nose and Throat) was not established until 1924 and the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology followed in 1930.  Now every medical specialty has a board certification process, but ophthalmology led the way. The name changed to the American Board of Ophthalmology in 1933.

Then, as now, not all those who undertook the process passed. Ten physicians were board certified that first year but 3 more were invited to study harder and return in another year.  Since that that first examination, 30,000 ophthalmologist have become board certified including myself.

What does board certification mean and why is it important? The examination process assures that your doctor has the knowledge provide you with the best possible care.  The process begins with an intensive written qualifying exam covering all aspects of eye care. Once you have passed by doing well in all seven sections (and many don’t), it is on to a grueling oral exam a year or so later.

I am proud to be part of this grand tradition. As with those doctors in 1916, we are committed to providing the highest quality medical and surgical eye care available.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care including small incision cataract surgery, blade-free LASIK, macular degeneration care, glaucoma care, dry eye treatments and more.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.

 


WHEN IS A VISUAL HALLUCINATION NOT A CAUSE FOR ALARM? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
February 2, 2016

I once had a patient state very calmly that there was an army in her backyard filming a movie. Her family was quite concerned and worried that she was developing dementia or a serious mental illness. Fortunately neither was the case.  These “hallucinations” were caused by a condition called the Charles Bonnet Syndrome.

This syndrome occurs in those with limited vision.  In my experience, it is generally seen in patients with severe macular degeneration but recently a patient came in with this who had suffered a stroke affecting his vision on one side. Only 10-40% of those with severe vision loss experience the syndrome. Charles Bonnet was a Swiss philosopher who first described these visual hallucinations in 1760 after observing his grandfather who was going blind from cataracts.

The mechanism is thought to be due to the brain filling in for the reduced visual input. The episodes last from seconds to minutes and are of variable frequency. About 18 months after the onset they just usually gradually disappear. The most common type involves faces of people but animals or plants may also be seen. The images appear smaller than in real life.  Another hallmark is that vision is the only sense involved so there are no associated abnormal sounds or smells.

What to do if you yourself or a family member are experiencing this syndrome? First be sure to have a thorough eye examination to see if there are any treatment options for the vision loss. If none are available, then reassurance from family and friends about what is real and what is not is helpful for the patient.  Hopefully the above explanation will set all involved at ease.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is an Eye Physician & Surgeon (Ophthalmologist) practicing at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin.  She specializes in blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.LakeShoreVision.com.


YOU WANT TO PUT PLUGS IN MY EYELIDS?? By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
January 13, 2016

When we suggest punctal “plugs” to a patient, the reaction varies from curiosity to outright panic.  While they are quite routine dry eye care, many patients have not heard of them.  The goal of the plugs is to keep the tears you have in your eyes longer, decreasing your need for tear supplements and improving your eye comfort.

On the upper and lower eyelids in each eye, there are a total of 4 small openings towards the nose which are called puncta.  Each leads to a tiny tube that drains your tears into the back of your nose. The bottom ones carry about 2/3 of the tears and the top the other 1/3. If we block the bottom puncta in each eye, your eyes stay wetter. The plugs are very small, about 1-2 mm, and made of soft plastic. They are easily inserted in the office in a matter of seconds.

Generally we do not suggest plugs at the first signs of dry eyes. We try artificial tears first. If the patient feels that they need to use the tears more than 4 times per day or they are not providing any relief, then plugs or a prescription product called Restasis may be suggested. Restasis changed the quality of the tears so they coat the eye better. As noted above, the plugs change the quantity of the tears. Sometimes both quality and quantity need improvement. Should that be the case, then plugs and Restasis might be used together.

Winter is dry eye season! The symptoms include blurred reading vision at the end of the day, feeling like there is something in the eyes, eye fatigue, red eyes and more. Give us a call if you need relief from this common eye problem.

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care. For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.

 


BLUE EYED PEOPLE ARE ALL RELATED... YOU JUST HAVE TO GO BACK A FEW YEARS!

By editor
December 21, 2015

Check out this link to see where you came from if you have blue eyes.


FASTEST LASIK IN THE U.S. JUST CAME TO LAKESHORE EYE CARE! By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By editor
December 14, 2015

Just when I thought LASIK was as quick and precise as it could possibly be, several new breakthroughs came along to make it even better.  Last month I upgraded both the lasers I use for LASIK vision correction to take advantage these new innovations. The faster, safer and more precise laser system means that you can expect to have even more spectacular vision after the procedure.

WaveLight Laser Suite

I had been using the IntraLase and VISX lasers for a number of years but once those companies were acquired by a larger corporation, it seemed that innovation became stalled. Then Alcon came out with FS 200 Fentosecond laser to make the initial flap and the WaveLight EX500 Excimer laser for contouring the cornea to improve vision.  Together they provide an integrated laser system that is the fastest available in the U.S.

The lasers are not just faster, they are also more precise.  The improvement in vision, especially for those with more extreme prescriptions, is even better than before. They also open up LASIK to many who may not have been candidates in the past because they can treat the widest range of prescriptions of any laser available.

Patients love the improved comfort and potential to see even better than they did with glasses or contacts before surgery. I appreciate the precise automation with the smallest laser spot size in the industry and fastest eye tracking system available:  20 times faster than natural eye movements! I’ve gained many more options for individualizing LASIK  for a particular patient and you’ve gained an improved outlook on life.

For more information, visit our web site to access brand new videos about the new WaveLight system and to see what you can expect on your procedure day: http://www.lakeshorevision.com/services/ilasik/#main

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a board certified ophthalmologist (Eye Physician and Surgeon) who was the first ophthalmologist in the Milwaukee area to perform laser vision correction. She has been at the forefront of every advancement since then.  Call today to arrange your screening exam to take advantage of the newest of the new!

262-241-1919


Eyes red with swimming? Read this!

By editor
November 29, 2015

Good thing summer is over... but not such good news for those who love swimming pools! Click on the image below for a new study about why your eyes get red in the pool.


NOVEMBER IS DIABETIC EYE DISEASE MONTH By Dr. Martha Jay, Ophthalmologist at Lakeshore Eye Care Professionals with offices in Mequon & Saukville (near Cedarburg, Grafton, River Hills and other North Shore Communities)

By editor
November 17, 2015

The Wisconsin Council of the Blind and Visually Impaired recognizes November as “Diabetic Eye Disease Month.” The purpose of this designation is to increase awareness about how diabetes can potentially affect your eyes and how to prevent it.

We like to see diabetics at least yearly for a complete eye examination.  That includes dilating drops so we can see into the back of the eye called the retina.  We are looking for abnormal blood vessels, bleeding or swelling. If these problems are detected early, treatments such as lasers or injections are more effective.

Vision loss from diabetic eye disease is preventable.  Tight control of your blood sugar is the key. This means carefully monitoring at home and/or at your doctor’s office. The hemoglobin A1c is a simple blood test that measures of how well controlled your blood sugars have been maintained over the prior 90 days.  Primary care physicians generally like to see values on this test between 6 and 7.  Of equal importance is early detection of diabetic eye disease as that improves your chances of protecting your vision.

We stay in close contact with your primary care physician with annual reports about your eyes so they can be fully aware of whether diabetes has affected them. The eyes actually serve as a “window” into the rest of your body: diabetes has the potential of affecting small blood vessels elsewhere such as the heart, kidney and feet. If your eyes look good, then that is generally good news for the rest of you.

Are you a diabetic who has gone more than a year since an eye examination? Time to call to set one up, see you soon!

Dr. Martha F. Jay

Martha F. Jay, Ph.D., M.D.

Dr. Martha Jay is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist specializing in medical and surgical eye care such as blade-free LASIK and small incision cataract surgery. For more eye care information, visit www.LakeShoreVision.com or call 262-241-1919.


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