Dr. James Ivanoski’s Blogs

WHAT DOES 20/20 VISION REALLY MEAN? By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
July 8, 2020

The measurement of visual acuity is generally noted as the number 20 on the top and another number on the bottom of a fraction.  20/20 is considered normal vision.  If the bottom number is larger than 20, the vision is worse than normal.  For example, a person with 20/200 vision is seeing more poorly than someone with 20/30 vision.  Some fortunate people can actually see better than 20/20 (20/15 or even 20/10).  The best visual acuity thought achievable by a human is 20/8.

The minimum separation between two lines that the average person can see is 1 second of arc or 1/60 of a degree.  Using a mathematical formula, this translates into an 8.75 mm (0.35 inch) letter viewed from 20 feet away.  In other words, a person with 20/20 vision can read a 0.35 inch letter at 20 feet.  The best a person with 20/100 vision can read at 20 feet is only a 1.75 inch letter.  Stated in another way, a person with 20/100 vision would have to move into 20 feet to see the same sized letter that a person with 20/20 vision could see at 100 feet.

The visual acuity charts that we use are all based on these letter sizing calculations.  Herman Snellen was the ophthalmologist that invented the first standardized eye chart in 1862.  We still use similar charts to measure vision today.  While our vision charts are projected or digital, we still use a mirror to simulate a 20 foot long room.  So now you know what 20/20 means AND why we have mirrors in all our exam rooms.

At Madison Medical Eye Care our passion is to keep you seeing as close to 20/20 as possible for your entire life, not just in the year 2020!

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James is an Optometrist practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Lisa Bennett at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He provides comprehensive eye care for the whole family and accepts most insurance plans.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedical.com.


“TOP DOCS” AGAIN IN THE MILWAUKEE MAGAZINE SURVEY By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 14, 2020

Once again, all of the doctors at Madison Medical Eye Care have made the list of “Top Docs” in the Milwaukee Magazine survey! Even our newest addition, Dr. Lisa Bennett, made the list. That’s a testimony to what a positive impression she has made since her arrival last year. Check out the May issue for primary care doctors and specialists in the Milwaukee area who were selected by their peers as outstanding health care providers.

We have lots of company in the survey with our colleagues at Madison Medical Affiliates. Those doctors made the list in Endocrinology, Dermatology, Colon & Rectal Surgery, Breast Surgery, Gastroenterology, General Surgery, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Sleep Medicine, Urology and Vascular Surgery.  We are very pleased to be in the company of such well respected physicians.

While we all joined Madison Medical Affiliates in January of 2018, there is now another Ophthalmology practice in the group: Drs. Fabric, Shafrin and Bloom joined Madison Medical Affiliates last year. Their office is in Glendale and gives you even more opportunities to see “Top Docs.”

While survey results are nice, the real purpose of our day is providing our patients with the best possible vision whether it is through glasses, contact lenses, refractive surgery or cataract surgery. Dr. Jay, Dr. Bennett and myself provide comprehensive eye care for the whole family and accept most insurance plans. For more eye care information, visit our web site noted below.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an optometrist practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Lisa Bennett. He provides comprehensive eye care for the whole family and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedical.com.


ASTIGMATISM EXPLAINED By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin,

By user-admin
March 11, 2020

Are your eyes more like a football or a baseball?

Astigmatism refers to the curvature of the surface of your eye.  If your eye is round like a baseball, you do not have astigmatism and can quit reading now!  But if the front of your eye has a curvature, making it shaped more like a football than a baseball, then you have astigmatism.

Generally patients don’t realize they have astigmatism.  We may mention it when we determine your glasses prescription but often we just write the prescription to compensate for it.

Serious discussions of astigmatism generally start when a patient is considering cataract surgery, LASIK vision correction or contact lenses.  There are special Toric contacts available for those with astigmatism and often they work quite well.  Many, however, find that toric contacts don’t provide consistent vision as they tend to rotate on the eye with blinking.

There is a common misconception that you cannot have LASIK if you have astigmatism but this is absolutely not true.  In fact this is actually a frequent reason for patients to elect to have LASIK as they are unhappy with their vision in glasses or contact lenses.

If you have astigmatism and cataracts, we can insert Toric implants at the time of surgery to improve your vision. More recently, Bifocal Toric implants have become available, now making bifocal implants an option for those with astigmatism.

Still confused?  Call for a complete eye examination and we will determine if you have significant astigmatism and how best to compensate for it.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an Optometrist providing comprehensive eye care for the whole family. He practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Lisa Bennett at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


ABOUT PUPILLARY DISTANCE (PD) By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
March 6, 2020

Online purchasing of eyeglasses has become much more popular in the past few years. Many people are coming in to our office are asking for their “PD.” The PD (inter-pupillary distance) is the distance measured from the center of one pupil to the center of the other pupil. This measurement is done in millimeters with a ruler, a device called a pupilometer, or by using your computer/phone camera.

This measurement has been somewhat trivialized by the online glasses industry in recent years. The PD is a measurement that is crucial to making glasses correctly. This measurement is even more critical with strong glasses prescriptions. Optometrists and ophthalmologists are the doctors that prescribe the correct prescription to be put in the lenses. Opticians (professionals that fit and make eyeglasses) have always been the professionals that measure the PD. This leaves consumers and doctors trying to figure out who is responsible for the PD measurement when glasses are ordered online.

The PD needs to be measured differently according to the type of lenses that are being put in the frame. A different PD measurement will be done for progressive lenses, reading glasses, or distance glasses.

As online glasses sites are becoming more popular, they are offering consumers easier online tools to measure their own PD. At our office, since we do not make or sell eyeglasses, we generally advise people to use online tools at home to measure their own PD. If the prescription is strong, or if bifocals are being ordered, we still recommend seeking the professional help of local opticians to measure the PD correctly.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski is an optometrist practicing with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Lisa Bennett at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


HISTORY OF CONTACT LENSES By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
February 5, 2020

Contact lenses were first invented by a German glass blower, F.A. Muller, in 1887. Adolph E. Flick, a French physician, successfully fit the first glass contact lens on the human eye in 1888. Contact lenses evolved to become a mainstream vision correction device with the invention of PMMA hard plastic contact lenses by Kevin Tuohy, a California optician, in 1948. A giant breakthrough occurred in 1959 when Czech chemists Otto Wichterle and Drahoslav Lim invented hydrogel plastic. This new plastic product led to the first soft contact lens to be introduced by Bausch & Lomb in 1971.

Contact lenses are now used routinely to correct for vision problems just like glasses. Soft and gas permeable contacts are used for people that are nearsighted, farsighted, have astigmatism or need bifocal correction.

Specialty contact lenses can be used to help medical problems of the eye as well. Gas permeable (hard) contact lenses can be used to help people that have irregular corneas. Larger gas permeable contacts, called scleral lenses, can be used to help conditions like severe dry eye or contact lens intolerance. Contact lenses can be even used as a bandage for corneal abrasions.

Future applications for contact lenses may include drug delivery systems for eye diseases like glaucoma. Microchips may be implanted in contacts to monitor eye health conditions or even transmit video directly to the eye. The future is quite bright for these little pieces of plastic invented over a hundred years ago! Interested in contact lenses? Call for an appointment and we will determine the best option is for you.

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices comprehensive optometry at Madison Medical Eye Care. He particularly welcomes hard-to-fit contact lens patients and accepts most insurance plans.  For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


WHY WE DO WHAT WE DO By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
October 4, 2019

What are all those questions, measurements and eye drops about when you come for an eye exam?  These are reasonable questions that most of us wonder about but rarely think to ask.  A complete eye exam is a thorough medical evaluation of your eyes and your vision.

We start with a comprehensive medical history because many medical conditions and medications can affect the eyes. Diabetes and high blood pressure are obvious but arthritic conditions, neurological problems and many other medical diagnoses can have an influence on the functioning of the eyes.  We then ask about any vision problems you may be having to get a sense of how your vision is affecting activities such as driving and reading.

The measuring comes in with determining your current glasses prescription and seeing if we can improve on that with a change - this is called refraction. We also check your pupils, eye movements, side vision and eye pressure.  All these factors are critical to being sure no problems such as glaucoma are present.

The reason for the dilating drops is to get a clear view of the back of your eye called the retina.  This is the only place in the body where we can directly view blood vessels which can be affected by diabetes and other problems. We also look for tears, tumors and evidence of macular degeneration.

So each and every step is important at least every 1-2 years!

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices with Dr. Martha Jay and Dr. Lisa Bennett at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon and Saukville, Wisconsin. He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


BLUE BLOCKERS By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 23, 2019

Blue blocker glasses are a hot topic in eye care.  These amber tinted sunglasses reduce glare and protect the eyes from ultraviolet light (invisible radiation from the sun that causes sunburn) and visible blue light.

For years we have known that ultraviolet light (invisible radiation from the sun that causes sunburn) can accelerate age related eye problems like cataracts, skin cancer, and macular degeneration.  We recommend that everybody wear sunglasses (including blue blockers) when outdoors to protect the eyes from ultraviolet light.

Now studies are being done on visible blue light and the effects on the eyes.   There is no conclusive evidence that blue light from hand held devices and computer screens damage the eyes in the same way that ultraviolet light does.  Our computers and phones are not causing macular degeneration and cataracts.  We do not recommend specific blue blocking glasses for computer use, but sometimes a light amber tint may improve comfort (reduce eye strain and glare) when viewing a computer screen.

The blue light from computers and hand held devices has been shown to affect sleep cycles.  It is recommended to avoid screen time 1-2 hours before bedtime.  Lack of sleep affects overall health including eye health

Dr. James Ivanoski

Eye strain and dry eye are worsened by excessive screen time.  It is recommended to take a break from computer work every 20 minutes to look at a farther away object for at least 20 seconds.  Blue blocker glasses are a good thing since they also protect from the harmful ultraviolet light, but are not necessary for looking at computer screens or phones.

Dr. James is an Optometrist practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He specializes in comprehensive eye care for all ages and accepts most insurance plans.  He particularly welcomes contact lens wearers who have been having difficulties getting the right fit or vision from their contacts in the past.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


SLEEP IMPROVES DRY EYES By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
August 13, 2019

Sleep problems affect many: either not being able to get to sleep, not being able to stay asleep, being sleepy during the day, and/or breathing problems such as sleep apnea during the night. They affect how you feel the next day and how productive you can be.  Dry eyes are an even more common annoyance. The symptoms of dry eyes generally include a sandy sensation or the feeling that there is something in your eyes.  Blurred near vision, especially towards the end of the day or with computer use, is also frequently noticed.  A new study has now linked the two.

Published in the medical journal Investigative Ophthalmology in May, a study out of Singapore found that insomnia, sleep apnea and reduced hours of sleep per night were all associated with an increase in the severity of dry eye symptoms.  They used a number of well-known questionnaires to assess the sleep patterns of over 3 thousand people and then obtained a detailed history of their dry eye symptoms. Most of the sleep issues noted above were associated with at least a 70% increase in dry eye symptoms.

Dr. James Ivanoski

What can you do about it? You can consult your primary care physician about further evaluation and treatment of your sleep issues. They can determine if further testing is indicated or if changes in your medications are recommended. In the mean time you can treat your dry eyes with artificial tears. If you are using the tears more than 4 times per day be sure to use the preservative-free type that come in individual vials so as not to cause more eye irritation. There are prescription medications for dry eyes if tears do not work. We can discuss those and other options at your next eye examination. Call for a sooner appointment if your symptoms of dry eyes are not improving.

Dr. Ivanoski is an optometrist practicing at Madison Medical Eye Care with Drs. Martha Jay and Lisa Bennett.  He welcomes patients of all ages into his practice and accepts most insurance plans. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.


‘I THINK I HAVE A RETINAL DETACHMENT” By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care/Mequon with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
June 14, 2019

If you experience an abrupt increase in floaters or start seeing flashing lights in your peripheral vision, you might immediately assume that you are experiencing a retinal detachment. While this may be the case, the only way to diagnose a retinal tear or detachment is with a thorough dilated eye examination with an eye care professional.  While it may seem tempting to go to an emergency room, they will most likely refer you to an ophthalmologist or optometrist. You can save time and money by calling us first.

When should you call? If you notice a significant increase in floaters, new onset of flashing lights in your peripheral vision and certainly if you notice some loss of side vision, call right away. If it is in the middle of the night, you can easily wait until the morning to call. If it on a weekend, we are available with an option to reach the on- call doctor on our answering machine. We generally recommend the examination be performed within 24 to 48 hours of the onset of symptoms.

The eye is filled with a gelatin-like material called vitreous.  Over time, it breaks down - becoming more liquid with small collagen particles casting a shadow on the retina.  The result is the appearance of small spots, squiggly lines, clouds or spider webs moving across your vision.  Flashes of light occur when the fluid shifts within the eye, tugging on the retina (the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye).

Dr. James Ivanoski

The reason it is important to diagnose a retinal detachment is that it may require laser treatment or even surgery to preserve you vision. Early detection is the key to optimal outcome from either procedure. Realize that we are here for you if need be.

Dr. James Ivanoski works with Dr. Martha Jay and soon will be welcoming Dr. Lisa Bennett to Madison Medical Eye Care/Mequon. He is an Optometrist specializing in comprehensive eye care for the whole family including contact lens fitting. For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


SWIMMING AND CONTACT LENSES By Dr. James Ivanoski, Optometrist at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin

By user-admin
May 1, 2019

You can’t see without your glasses so why not swim in your contact lenses?  The “why not” has to do with safety: swimming in contact lenses significantly increases your risk of developing eye problems that range from mild to quite severe. Most contact lenses are at least 50% water.  This means that chlorinated water penetrates your contacts and stays in contact with the surface of your eye for up to an hour after swimming.  The result is an irritation to the surface of your eye and an increased risk of infection.

While a mild eye irritation may go away in a day or so, a severe eye infection can result in permanent vision loss.  Even in the best maintained pool or spa, bacteria can be present.  In lake water, a severe pathogen called acanthamoeba may be present that causes a difficult to treat corneal ulcer.  This protozoa penetrates the cornea rapidly and often requires specially formulated eye drops to save the eye.  Beaches may also present the possibility of a fusarium fungal infection.

Those glasses may be bulky but they are your better choice over contacts in the water.  Another alternative is LASIK vision correction.  With LASIK you can free yourself of the hassles of glasses in the water and still safely enjoy the outdoors.  LASIK is actually safer than contact lenses on dry land too!  Our Dr. Martha Jay is a leader in blade-free LASIK vision correction so one call to our office is all you need to get started on improving your vision safely.

Call for a free LASIK screening exam today, you won’t regret it. In the meantime, don’t wear those contacts in the water!

Dr. James Ivanoski

Dr. James Ivanoski practices with Dr. Martha Jay and soon with Dr. Lisa Bennett at Madison Medical Eye Care with offices in Mequon & Saukville, Wisconsin. He specializes in comprehensive eye care for the whole family, including contact lens fitting.

For more eye care information, call 262-241-1919 or visit www.MadisonMedicalEyeCare.com.

 


Stay Connected


We want to hear from you